Discussion:
Henri Coulette / Critique by John Phillips
(too old to reply)
Will Dockery
2015-03-20 14:44:36 UTC
Permalink
Critique of "At The Telephone Club" a Henri Coulette poem, written by John Phillips

"...An atmospheric, secretive piece by Henri Coulette. His work calls to mind Columbus poet Will Dockery for me, as both of their work seems to exist in a shrouded other-world: for Dockery it is Shadowville, which we'll address in another column; for Coulette it is the smoky noir Los Angeles of Raymond Chandler, full of spies and madams and detectives and liars, people with secrets hanging out in scuzzy hotel rooms and putting out cigarettes in empty bottles of cheap beer [...] This poem, from his first book "War of the Secret Agents and other poems," is so deep in Coulette's dark alternate world that you can see Philip Marlowe sitting by himself down at the other end of the bar, with his hat pushed back on his head, looking at his drink, thinking. But it's the voice of the poem's speaker that's most interesting. The character is drawn in a few nasty strokes, just a few lines from inside his head, and yet there's a sense of who he is, and where he's going, and how bad things will be when he gets there..." -John Phillips

Read Henri Coulette's poetry here:
https://www.facebook.com/notes/john-phillips/a-poem-a-day-9/129690318737
Will Dockery
2015-03-23 13:33:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Critique of "At The Telephone Club" a Henri Coulette poem, written by John Phillips
"...An atmospheric, secretive piece by Henri Coulette. His work calls to mind Columbus poet Will Dockery for me, as both of their work seems to exist in a shrouded other-world: for Dockery it is Shadowville, which we'll address in another column; for Coulette it is the smoky noir Los Angeles of Raymond Chandler, full of spies and madams and detectives and liars, people with secrets hanging out in scuzzy hotel rooms and putting out cigarettes in empty bottles of cheap beer [...] This poem, from his first book "War of the Secret Agents and other poems," is so deep in Coulette's dark alternate world that you can see Philip Marlowe sitting by himself down at the other end of the bar, with his hat pushed back on his head, looking at his drink, thinking. But it's the voice of the poem's speaker that's most interesting. The character is drawn in a few nasty strokes, just a few lines from inside his head, and yet there's a sense of who he is, and where he's going, and how bad things will be when he gets there..." -John Phillips
https://www.facebook.com/notes/john-phillips/a-poem-a-day-9/129690318737
Reading these writings by John Phillips as well as now looking for information on those fine days of poetry wherin I won the 1998 poetry award (I'm looking at Cujo's request, see the other thread) sent me into memories of the vast line of contenders for poetry back in those days.

While remembering the early days of what I consider the early, and greatest in some ways, art-music-poetry scene in 1995-97. It looked that perhaps anything was possible from the opening chords and verses of the Columbus-Phenix City scene, not just music, but poetry, art... ideas. Since not only was there the early, frantic moments of a "music scene", meaning music created in, from, and sometimes about the Columbus-Phenix City area, our music, but also a fairly complex network of poets, and yet another spiraling group of artists... and I walked into that surprising world sometime early in 1995, when, insane as it may sound now, The Loft held a weekly poetry reading, and even more insane seeming, the place was packed out loaded with people, not only just poets but an audience. But that's a story, maybe a novel, for another time. What this post is about is...

While remembering the early days, I decided to Google some of the names from this aspect of the Columbus-Phenix City music-art-poetry scene, some names remain current here, in fact draw the connection between the poetry scene with the music scene stronger than previously considered or stated, Jon Saunders, his brother Frank Saunders, Jack Snipe, Heath Williamson, Henry Conley, Rebbeca Wright-Harris, Brian Fowler and others I will remember later, founders of the "Columbus music scene" were also involved with the poetry scene. Others, such as Sean Bernard, Sandra Pollock, Donnie Strickland, Lisa Scarborough, Karen Keller, Nita Gale, Eric duckworth, Brad Smith are no longer seen on Broadway, The Loft, or anywhere else around town... so I did a quick Google and this is the first entry I've found, so far, so it is a start, my earlier search for Military poet Don Strickland:

http://alt.poetry.narkive.com/ZrQKwJ8K/the-poetry-of-donnie-strickland

I knew Donnie Strickland way back in the 1990s, and was pleased to
happen across some of his poetry just by chance...

PRISM: IN THE EVERYWHERE COLORS

Both-sides of the coin are now revealed without either being
embraced, with neither Skye or Lani winning.
I wonder if this curiosity of mine is a vague allegorical attempt
of mine to describe the daily battles I go through not to show
favoritism, nepotism, to one daughter above the other step-daughter?
Some Apollonisian and Dionysian mirror whose surface
I rotate until I can justify the countless choices that
I am forced to make on a never-ending basis?
Knowing what I know doesn't keep me sane,
I just suffice to rip-out my own heart, cut it into pieces,
and give a portion to Skye and Lani, telling them to share.
Nothing is ever easy.
-Donnie Strickland

"...Donnie Strickland is currently a "soldier of misfortune" as a
corporal in the US Army who periodically holds readings at "The Loft"
near Columbus, Georgia. Check out more of his and others' writings &
ravings at Donnie's Colostomy Grab Bag web site and at Scars
Publications."

I hope Donnie's doing well, as I attempt to find him again.

--
Gone Too Far / Will Dockery, Jack Snipe & Brian Mallard:
http://www.reverbnation.com/play_now/song_11596860
George Dance
2015-03-25 22:55:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Critique of "At The Telephone Club" a Henri Coulette poem, written by John Phillips
"...An atmospheric, secretive piece by Henri Coulette. His work calls to mind Columbus poet Will Dockery for me, as both of their work seems to exist in a shrouded other-world: for Dockery it is Shadowville, which we'll address in another column; for Coulette it is the smoky noir Los Angeles of Raymond Chandler, full of spies and madams and detectives and liars, people with secrets hanging out in scuzzy hotel rooms and putting out cigarettes in empty bottles of cheap beer [...] This poem, from his first book "War of the Secret Agents and other poems," is so deep in Coulette's dark alternate world that you can see Philip Marlowe sitting by himself down at the other end of the bar, with his hat pushed back on his head, looking at his drink, thinking. But it's the voice of the poem's speaker that's most interesting. The character is drawn in a few nasty strokes, just a few lines from inside his head, and yet there's a sense of who he is, and where he's going, and how bad things will be when he gets there..." -John Phillips
Nice. He doesn't compare you to Coulette; he compares Coulette to you. That counts for a bit.
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.facebook.com/notes/john-phillips/a-poem-a-day-9/129690318737
Because Coulette died only in 88 (and wasn't even born in 1923), I don't have any of his poems on blog or wiki; but here's his PPP article:

http://pennyspoetry.wikia.com/wiki/Henri_Coulette

And a link to 8 more poems. (My favorite of that lot is "Petition", on the death of a cat.)

http://allpoetry.com/poems/by/Henri%20Coulette
Will Dockery
2015-03-26 07:37:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by George Dance
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.facebook.com/notes/john-phillips/a-poem-a-day-9/129690318737
http://pennyspoetry.wikia.com/wiki/Henri_Coulette
And a link to 8 more poems. (My favorite of that lot is "Petition", on the death of a cat.)
http://allpoetry.com/poems/by/Henri%20Coulette
Coulette was an interesting person, and poet.

I'm thinking Michael Pendragon may be familiar with him because of his connections to Orson Welles, if Michael reads this thread.
Michael Pendragon
2015-03-26 12:53:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by George Dance
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.facebook.com/notes/john-phillips/a-poem-a-day-9/129690318737
http://pennyspoetry.wikia.com/wiki/Henri_Coulette
And a link to 8 more poems. (My favorite of that lot is "Petition", on the death of a cat.)
http://allpoetry.com/poems/by/Henri%20Coulette
Coulette was an interesting person, and poet.
I'm thinking Michael Pendragon may be familiar with him because of his connections to Orson Welles, if Michael reads this thread.
I couldn't think of any of his poems offhand, but I clicked on the link and read a few. He's exceptionally good for a modern.
Will Dockery
2015-03-26 13:05:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by George Dance
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.facebook.com/notes/john-phillips/a-poem-a-day-9/129690318737
http://pennyspoetry.wikia.com/wiki/Henri_Coulette
And a link to 8 more poems. (My favorite of that lot is "Petition", on the death of a cat.)
http://allpoetry.com/poems/by/Henri%20Coulette
Coulette was an interesting person, and poet.
I'm thinking Michael Pendragon may be familiar with him because of his connections to Orson Welles, if Michael reads this thread.
I couldn't think of any of his poems offhand, but I clicked on the link and read a few. He's exceptionally good for a modern.
I think Coulette had a great eay for detail, something that to me is essential in "modern poetry", very likely picked up from his close proximity to phtographers and film makers.
Will Dockery
2015-03-26 08:24:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by George Dance
Post by Will Dockery
Critique of "At The Telephone Club" a Henri Coulette poem, written by John Phillips
"...An atmospheric, secretive piece by Henri Coulette. His work calls to
mind Columbus poet Will Dockery for me, as both of their work seems to
exist in a shrouded other-world: for Dockery it is Shadowville, which
we'll address in another column; for Coulette it is the smoky noir Los
Angeles of Raymond Chandler, full of spies and madams and detectives and
liars, people with secrets hanging out in scuzzy hotel rooms and putting
out cigarettes in empty bottles of cheap beer [...] This poem, from his
first book "War of the Secret Agents and other poems," is so deep in
Coulette's dark alternate world that you can see Philip Marlowe sitting
by himself down at the other end of the bar, with his hat pushed back on
his head, looking at his drink, thinking. But it's the voice of the
poem's speaker that's most interesting. The character is drawn in a few
nasty strokes, just a few lines from inside his head, and yet there's a
sense of who he is, and where he's going, and how bad things will be
when he gets there..." -John Phillips
Nice. He doesn't compare you to Coulette; he compares Coulette to you.
That counts for a bit.
John Phillips knows his game, that's for sure. Here's his essay on what he
calls the "diabolical" villanelle...

"Today we're returning to form by exploring form, specifically the
villanelle and its variations. I personally find poetic form to be a
liberating and fascinating challenge, a way of parsing my lines and images
to their leanest and sharpest, by giving them a shape in which only the
strongest parts fit. It's always a step in my revision process, seeing if
the poem can be given more energy and depth by reshaping it. Some poets find
formal writing unbearable, and feel it's an unnecessary construct that
prevents their work from taking the shape it desires for itself. The debate
rages on. The villanelle is a diabolical little form of French origin,
consisting of 19 lines and two rhymes, with a very strict pattern of
repetition..." -John Phillips

Read more at:
https://www.facebook.com/notes/john-phillips/poetry-periodically-21/149231028737
Will Dockery
2016-02-25 08:51:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by George Dance
Post by Will Dockery
Critique of "At The Telephone Club" a Henri Coulette poem, written by John Phillips
"...An atmospheric, secretive piece by Henri Coulette. His work calls to mind Columbus poet Will Dockery for me, as both of their work seems to exist in a shrouded other-world: for Dockery it is Shadowville, which we'll address in another column; for Coulette it is the smoky noir Los Angeles of Raymond Chandler, full of spies and madams and detectives and liars, people with secrets hanging out in scuzzy hotel rooms and putting out cigarettes in empty bottles of cheap beer [...] This poem, from his first book "War of the Secret Agents and other poems," is so deep in Coulette's dark alternate world that you can see Philip Marlowe sitting by himself down at the other end of the bar, with his hat pushed back on his head, looking at his drink, thinking. But it's the voice of the poem's speaker that's most interesting. The character is drawn in a few nasty strokes, just a few lines from inside his head, and yet there's a sense of who he is, and where he's going, and how bad things will be when he gets there..." -John Phillips
Nice. He doesn't compare you to Coulette; he compares Coulette to you. That counts for a bit.
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.facebook.com/notes/john-phillips/a-poem-a-day-9/129690318737
http://pennyspoetry.wikia.com/wiki/Henri_Coulette
And a link to 8 more poems. (My favorite of that lot is "Petition", on the death of a cat.)
http://allpoetry.com/poems/by/Henri%20Coulette
An interesting character, poet and man, thanks for the update, George.

:)
Will Dockery
2017-12-26 11:02:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by George Dance
Post by Will Dockery
Critique of "At The Telephone Club" a Henri Coulette poem, written by John Phillips
"...An atmospheric, secretive piece by Henri Coulette. His work calls to mind Columbus poet Will Dockery for me, as both of their work seems to exist in a shrouded other-world: for Dockery it is Shadowville, which we'll address in another column; for Coulette it is the smoky noir Los Angeles of Raymond Chandler, full of spies and madams and detectives and liars, people with secrets hanging out in scuzzy hotel rooms and putting out cigarettes in empty bottles of cheap beer [...] This poem, from his first book "War of the Secret Agents and other poems," is so deep in Coulette's dark alternate world that you can see Philip Marlowe sitting by himself down at the other end of the bar, with his hat pushed back on his head, looking at his drink, thinking. But it's the voice of the poem's speaker that's most interesting. The character is drawn in a few nasty strokes, just a few lines from inside his head, and yet there's a sense of who he is, and where he's going, and how bad things will be when he gets there..." -John Phillips
Nice. He doesn't compare you to Coulette; he compares Coulette to you. That counts for a bit.
Yes, I must admit that it isn't hard to like writing such as this, is it?

"...Columbus poet Will Dockery for me, as both of their work seems to exist in a shrouded other-world: for Dockery it is Shadowville... for Coulette it is the smoky noir Los Angeles of Raymond Chandler, full of spies and madams and detectives and liars, people with secrets hanging out in scuzzy hotel rooms and putting out cigarettes in empty bottles of cheap beer..."

:)
Post by George Dance
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.facebook.com/notes/john-phillips/a-poem-a-day-9/129690318737
http://pennyspoetry.wikia.com/wiki/Henri_Coulette
And a link to 8 more poems. (My favorite of that lot is "Petition", on the death of a cat.)
http://allpoetry.com/poems/by/Henri%20Coulette
Thanks, good to see this poet being remembered from obscurity, George.
Will Dockery
2018-02-17 11:22:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by George Dance
Post by Will Dockery
Critique of "At The Telephone Club" a Henri Coulette poem, written by John Phillips
"...An atmospheric, secretive piece by Henri Coulette. His work calls to
mind Columbus poet Will Dockery for me, as both of their work seems to
exist in a shrouded other-world: for Dockery it is Shadowville, which
we'll address in another column; for Coulette it is the smoky noir Los
Angeles of Raymond Chandler, full of spies and madams and detectives and
liars, people with secrets hanging out in scuzzy hotel rooms and putting
out cigarettes in empty bottles of cheap beer [...] This poem, from his
first book "War of the Secret Agents and other poems," is so deep in
Coulette's dark alternate world that you can see Philip Marlowe sitting
by himself down at the other end of the bar, with his hat pushed back on
his head, looking at his drink, thinking. But it's the voice of the
poem's speaker that's most interesting. The character is drawn in a few
nasty strokes, just a few lines from inside his head, and yet there's a
sense of who he is, and where he's going, and how bad things will be
when he gets there..." -John Phillips
Nice. He doesn't compare you to Coulette; he compares Coulette to you.
That counts for a bit.
Yes, I must admit that it isn't hard to like writing such as this, is it?

"...Columbus poet Will Dockery for me, as both of their work seems to exist
in a shrouded other-world: for Dockery it is Shadowville... for Coulette it
is the smoky noir Los Angeles of Raymond Chandler, full of spies and madams
and detectives and liars, people with secrets hanging out in scuzzy hotel
rooms and putting out cigarettes in empty bottles of cheap beer..."

:)
Post by George Dance
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.facebook.com/notes/john-phillips/a-poem-a-day-9/129690318737
Because Coulette died only in 88 (and wasn't even born in 1923), I don't
http://pennyspoetry.wikia.com/wiki/Henri_Coulette
And a link to 8 more poems. (My favorite of that lot is "Petition", on the death of a cat.)
http://allpoetry.com/poems/by/Henri%20Coulette
Thanks, good to see this poet being remembered from obscurity, George.

Bookmarked and bumped...
Will Dockery
2019-04-01 02:26:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by George Dance
Post by Will Dockery
Critique of "At The Telephone Club" a Henri Coulette poem, written by John Phillips
"...An atmospheric, secretive piece by Henri Coulette. His work calls to
mind Columbus poet Will Dockery for me, as both of their work seems to
exist in a shrouded other-world: for Dockery it is Shadowville, which
we'll address in another column; for Coulette it is the smoky noir Los
Angeles of Raymond Chandler, full of spies and madams and detectives and
liars, people with secrets hanging out in scuzzy hotel rooms and putting
out cigarettes in empty bottles of cheap beer [...] This poem, from his
first book "War of the Secret Agents and other poems," is so deep in
Coulette's dark alternate world that you can see Philip Marlowe sitting
by himself down at the other end of the bar, with his hat pushed back on
his head, looking at his drink, thinking. But it's the voice of the
poem's speaker that's most interesting. The character is drawn in a few
nasty strokes, just a few lines from inside his head, and yet there's a
sense of who he is, and where he's going, and how bad things will be
when he gets there..." -John Phillips
Nice. He doesn't compare you to Coulette; he compares Coulette to you.
That counts for a bit.
Yes, I must admit that it isn't hard to like writing such as this, is it?

"...Columbus poet Will Dockery for me, as both of their work seems to exist
in a shrouded other-world: for Dockery it is Shadowville... for Coulette it
is the smoky noir Los Angeles of Raymond Chandler, full of spies and madams
and detectives and liars, people with secrets hanging out in scuzzy hotel
rooms and putting out cigarettes in empty bottles of cheap beer..."

:)
Post by George Dance
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.facebook.com/notes/john-phillips/a-poem-a-day-9/129690318737
Because Coulette died only in 88 (and wasn't even born in 1923), I don't
http://pennyspoetry.wikia.com/wiki/Henri_Coulette
And a link to 8 more poems. (My favorite of that lot is "Petition", on the death of a cat.)
http://allpoetry.com/poems/by/Henri%20Coulette
Found in Drafts, should link to a thread...
g***@hotmail.com
2015-03-26 17:52:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
I think Coulette had a great eay for detail,
something that to me is essential in "modern
poetry",
Will Dockery
2015-03-26 18:45:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
I think Coulette had a great eay for detail,
something that to me is essential in "modern
poetry"
That's right, and I can also cite much of my own poetry for examples of
this:

http://comments.poetry.arts.alt.groups.com.ru/327828-Re_Sassanna_a_poem_by_Will_Dockery

Sassanna - a poem by Will Dockery published in the 1995 Poets Market.

Image of poem from Page 248 of Poets Market:

http://tinyurl.com/Sassanna-by-Will-Dockery

Google Books archive:

http://books.google.com/books?ei=3dGsUNO6N8eJqgGd2YDoCg&id=039ba9-971kC&dq=%221995+Poet%27s+Market%22+%22william+dockery%22&focus=searchwithinvolume&q=%221995+Poet%27s+Market%22+%22Sassanna%22

Or

http://tinyurl.com/Poets-Market-1995

1995 Poet's Market: Where & How to Publish Your Poetry
Christine Martin
Writer's Digest Books, 1994 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 552 pages
0 Reviews

This poet's directory contains 1,700 listings--U.S. and international
publishers, Canadian and U.S. art councils, contests and awards, conferences
and workshops, writing colonies, organizations and publications. Poets will
also find advice on submission formats, cover letters, record-keeping, and
other aspects of submitting.

And so it went, and goes... forever and ever, Amen.

:D
Will Dockery
2015-04-01 19:16:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Critique of "At The Telephone Club" a Henri Coulette poem, written by John Phillips
"...An atmospheric, secretive piece by Henri Coulette. His work calls to mind Columbus poet Will Dockery for me, as both of their work seems to exist in a shrouded other-world: for Dockery it is Shadowville, which we'll address in another column; for Coulette it is the smoky noir Los Angeles of Raymond Chandler, full of spies and madams and detectives and liars, people with secrets hanging out in scuzzy hotel rooms and putting out cigarettes in empty bottles of cheap beer [...] This poem, from his first book "War of the Secret Agents and other poems," is so deep in Coulette's dark alternate world that you can see Philip Marlowe sitting by himself down at the other end of the bar, with his hat pushed back on his head, looking at his drink, thinking. But it's the voice of the poem's speaker that's most interesting. The character is drawn in a few nasty strokes, just a few lines from inside his head, and yet there's a sense of who he is, and where he's going, and how bad things will be when he gets there..." -John Phillips
https://www.facebook.com/notes/john-phillips/a-poem-a-day-9/129690318737
As I was writing Corey earlier today, I think that we'll have a "poet of the day" every day this month, in addition to my usual attempt to post one (or more) poems per day in April.

And of course regulars such as George Dance has stated he has plans for celebrating the month, Horatio is hosting events at his Pigpen, and I would wager that Pendragon and probably Corey himself will have thier unique forms of recognition for National Poetry Month.

As Corey and I discussed it this morning...

=========================================================
Post by Will Dockery
I was just thinking about April Fools Day,
and wondering. Have you ever had one of
those days when it seemed like nobody took
anything you said seriously, no matter what?
Don't listen to me. I'm having one of those days.
This is also the first day of Nation Poetry Month, right?

I was thinking we should have a "poet of the day", every day.

What do you think?
===================================

Corey's answer was deleted before I could read it, but almost certainly it was some form of "Yes"... and so it goes.

I'll be naming a "Poet of the Day" every day this month, and to supplement these, I'll be running the notes of local poet John Phillips on alternating days, and of course, posting a poem-a-day for as long as I can hold up with that.

:D

Here's an archive of John Phillips' notes, as a preview, and on with the rest shortly...

https://www.facebook.com/disordinated/notes

And, John Phillips/Dr. Pogo's favorite poetry listing:

https://www.facebook.com/notes/john-phillips/dr-pogos-essential-reading/109397118737

Dr. Pogo's Essential Reading

"...I've been asked, directly or indirectly, for reading suggestions several times recently. So I'll make this list of things that I willingly recommend to any and everybody. I'll divide it roughly by genre or category to make it easier to wade through. Also, now that I've made some nice suggestions for you, recommend me something. You see here what I like..." -John Phillips

*Poetry (there are so many individual collections, I'll just list some favorite poets)

Emily Dickinson
Kobayashi Issa
William Carlos Williams
Wallace Stevens
Linda Pastan
E.E. Cummings
Matsuo Basho
Charles Simic
Mark Strand
Theodore Roethke
Elizabeth Bishop
Mary Oliver
James Wright
Richard Brautigan

The Practice of Poetry - ed. Robin Behn & Chase Twitchell
A Poetry Handbook - Mary Oliver
The Triggering Town - Richard Hugo
The Penguin Book of Zen Poetry - ed. Lucien Stryck

And so it goes... now onward with National Poetry Month!

:D
General Zod
2019-04-02 03:44:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
Critique of "At The Telephone Club" a Henri Coulette poem, written by John Phillips
"...An atmospheric, secretive piece by Henri Coulette. His work calls to mind Columbus poet Will Dockery for me, as both of their work seems to exist in a shrouded other-world: for Dockery it is Shadowville, which we'll address in another column; for Coulette it is the smoky noir Los Angeles of Raymond Chandler, full of spies and madams and detectives and liars, people with secrets hanging out in scuzzy hotel rooms and putting out cigarettes in empty bottles of cheap beer [...] This poem, from his first book "War of the Secret Agents and other poems," is so deep in Coulette's dark alternate world that you can see Philip Marlowe sitting by himself down at the other end of the bar, with his hat pushed back on his head, looking at his drink, thinking. But it's the voice of the poem's speaker that's most interesting. The character is drawn in a few nasty strokes, just a few lines from inside his head, and yet there's a sense of who he is, and where he's going, and how bad things will be when he gets there..." -John Phillips
https://www.facebook.com/notes/john-phillips/a-poem-a-day-9/129690318737
As I was writing Corey earlier today, I think that we'll have a "poet of the day" every day this month, in addition to my usual attempt to post one (or more) poems per day in April.
And of course regulars such as George Dance has stated he has plans for celebrating the month, Horatio is hosting events at his Pigpen, and I would wager that Pendragon and probably Corey himself will have thier unique forms of recognition for National Poetry Month.
As Corey and I discussed it this morning...
=========================================================
Post by Will Dockery
I was just thinking about April Fools Day,
and wondering. Have you ever had one of
those days when it seemed like nobody took
anything you said seriously, no matter what?
Don't listen to me. I'm having one of those days.
This is also the first day of Nation Poetry Month, right?
I was thinking we should have a "poet of the day", every day.
What do you think?
===================================
Corey's answer was deleted before I could read it, but almost certainly it was some form of "Yes"... and so it goes.
I'll be naming a "Poet of the Day" every day this month, and to supplement these, I'll be running the notes of local poet John Phillips on alternating days, and of course, posting a poem-a-day for as long as I can hold up with that.
:D
Here's an archive of John Phillips' notes, as a preview, and on with the rest shortly...
https://www.facebook.com/disordinated/notes
https://www.facebook.com/notes/john-phillips/dr-pogos-essential-reading/109397118737
Dr. Pogo's Essential Reading
"...I've been asked, directly or indirectly, for reading suggestions several times recently. So I'll make this list of things that I willingly recommend to any and everybody. I'll divide it roughly by genre or category to make it easier to wade through. Also, now that I've made some nice suggestions for you, recommend me something. You see here what I like..." -John Phillips
*Poetry (there are so many individual collections, I'll just list some favorite poets)
Emily Dickinson
Kobayashi Issa
William Carlos Williams
Wallace Stevens
Linda Pastan
E.E. Cummings
Matsuo Basho
Charles Simic
Mark Strand
Theodore Roethke
Elizabeth Bishop
Mary Oliver
James Wright
Richard Brautigan
The Practice of Poetry - ed. Robin Behn & Chase Twitchell
A Poetry Handbook - Mary Oliver
The Triggering Town - Richard Hugo
The Penguin Book of Zen Poetry - ed. Lucien Stryck
And so it goes... now onward with National Poetry Month!
:D
Classy stuff...……...
General Zod
2019-04-09 07:46:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
Critique of "At The Telephone Club" a Henri Coulette poem, written by John Phillips
"...An atmospheric, secretive piece by Henri Coulette. His work calls to mind Columbus poet Will Dockery for me, as both of their work seems to exist in a shrouded other-world: for Dockery it is Shadowville, which we'll address in another column; for Coulette it is the smoky noir Los Angeles of Raymond Chandler, full of spies and madams and detectives and liars, people with secrets hanging out in scuzzy hotel rooms and putting out cigarettes in empty bottles of cheap beer [...] This poem, from his first book "War of the Secret Agents and other poems," is so deep in Coulette's dark alternate world that you can see Philip Marlowe sitting by himself down at the other end of the bar, with his hat pushed back on his head, looking at his drink, thinking. But it's the voice of the poem's speaker that's most interesting. The character is drawn in a few nasty strokes, just a few lines from inside his head, and yet there's a sense of who he is, and where he's going, and how bad things will be when he gets there..." -John Phillips
https://www.facebook.com/notes/john-phillips/a-poem-a-day-9/129690318737
As I was writing Corey earlier today, I think that we'll have a "poet of the day" every day this month, in addition to my usual attempt to post one (or more) poems per day in April.
And of course regulars such as George Dance has stated he has plans for celebrating the month, Horatio is hosting events at his Pigpen, and I would wager that Pendragon and probably Corey himself will have thier unique forms of recognition for National Poetry Month.
As Corey and I discussed it this morning...
=========================================================
Post by Will Dockery
I was just thinking about April Fools Day,
and wondering. Have you ever had one of
those days when it seemed like nobody took
anything you said seriously, no matter what?
Don't listen to me. I'm having one of those days.
This is also the first day of Nation Poetry Month, right?
I was thinking we should have a "poet of the day", every day.
What do you think?
===================================
Corey's answer was deleted before I could read it, but almost certainly it was some form of "Yes"... and so it goes.
I'll be naming a "Poet of the Day" every day this month, and to supplement these, I'll be running the notes of local poet John Phillips on alternating days, and of course, posting a poem-a-day for as long as I can hold up with that.
:D
Here's an archive of John Phillips' notes, as a preview, and on with the rest shortly...
https://www.facebook.com/disordinated/notes
https://www.facebook.com/notes/john-phillips/dr-pogos-essential-reading/109397118737
Dr. Pogo's Essential Reading
"...I've been asked, directly or indirectly, for reading suggestions several times recently. So I'll make this list of things that I willingly recommend to any and everybody. I'll divide it roughly by genre or category to make it easier to wade through. Also, now that I've made some nice suggestions for you, recommend me something. You see here what I like..." -John Phillips
*Poetry (there are so many individual collections, I'll just list some favorite poets)
Emily Dickinson
Kobayashi Issa
William Carlos Williams
Wallace Stevens
Linda Pastan
E.E. Cummings
Matsuo Basho
Charles Simic
Mark Strand
Theodore Roethke
Elizabeth Bishop
Mary Oliver
James Wright
Richard Brautigan
The Practice of Poetry - ed. Robin Behn & Chase Twitchell
A Poetry Handbook - Mary Oliver
The Triggering Town - Richard Hugo
The Penguin Book of Zen Poetry - ed. Lucien Stryck
And so it goes... now onward with National Poetry Month!
:D
That Dr. Pogo... I met him a few times downtown as he was Busking.....

Moved to Macon GA now as I recall........
Will Dockery
2016-02-24 19:49:29 UTC
Permalink
Looking through the archives for something else, I found this, some of the excellent critiques by John Phillips:

Critique of "At The Telephone Club" a Henri Coulette poem, written by John Phillips

"...An atmospheric, secretive piece by Henri Coulette. His work calls to mind Columbus poet Will Dockery for me, as both of their work seems to exist in a shrouded other-world: for Dockery it is Shadowville, which we'll address in another column; for Coulette it is the smoky noir Los Angeles of Raymond Chandler, full of spies and madams and detectives and liars, people with secrets hanging out in scuzzy hotel rooms and putting out cigarettes in empty bottles of cheap beer

[...]

This poem, from his first book "War of the Secret Agents and other poems," is so deep in Coulette's dark alternate world that you can see Philip Marlowe sitting by himself down at the other end of the bar, with his hat pushed back on his head, looking at his drink, thinking. But it's the voice of the poem's speaker that's most interesting. The character is drawn in a few nasty strokes, just a few lines from inside his head, and yet there's a sense of who he is, and where he's going, and how bad things will be when he gets there..." -John Phillips

Read Henri Coulette's poetry here:
https://www.facebook.com/notes/john-phillips/a-poem-a-day-9/129690318737

And it isn't hard to like writing such as this, is it?

"...Columbus poet Will Dockery for me, as both of their work seems to exist in a shrouded other-world: for Dockery it is Shadowville... for Coulette it is the smoky noir Los Angeles of Raymond Chandler, full of spies and madams and detectives and liars, people with secrets hanging out in scuzzy hotel rooms and putting out cigarettes in empty bottles of cheap beer..."

:)
General Zod
2019-04-21 08:21:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Critique of "At The Telephone Club" a Henri Coulette poem, written by John Phillips
"...An atmospheric, secretive piece by Henri Coulette. His work calls to mind Columbus poet Will Dockery for me, as both of their work seems to exist in a shrouded other-world: for Dockery it is Shadowville, which we'll address in another column; for Coulette it is the smoky noir Los Angeles of Raymond Chandler, full of spies and madams and detectives and liars, people with secrets hanging out in scuzzy hotel rooms and putting out cigarettes in empty bottles of cheap beer [...] This poem, from his first book "War of the Secret Agents and other poems," is so deep in Coulette's dark alternate world that you can see Philip Marlowe sitting by himself down at the other end of the bar, with his hat pushed back on his head, looking at his drink, thinking. But it's the voice of the poem's speaker that's most interesting. The character is drawn in a few nasty strokes, just a few lines from inside his head, and yet there's a sense of who he is, and where he's going, and how bad things will be when he gets there..." -John Phillips
https://www.facebook.com/notes/john-phillips/a-poem-a-day-9/129690318737
Fabulous.... I must research this poet at greater length.....
Zod
2019-05-14 03:52:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Critique of "At The Telephone Club" a Henri Coulette poem, written by John Phillips
"...An atmospheric, secretive piece by Henri Coulette. His work calls to mind Columbus poet Will Dockery for me, as both of their work seems to exist in a shrouded other-world: for Dockery it is Shadowville, which we'll address in another column; for Coulette it is the smoky noir Los Angeles of Raymond Chandler, full of spies and madams and detectives and liars, people with secrets hanging out in scuzzy hotel rooms and putting out cigarettes in empty bottles of cheap beer [...] This poem, from his first book "War of the Secret Agents and other poems," is so deep in Coulette's dark alternate world that you can see Philip Marlowe sitting by himself down at the other end of the bar, with his hat pushed back on his head, looking at his drink, thinking. But it's the voice of the poem's speaker that's most interesting. The character is drawn in a few nasty strokes, just a few lines from inside his head, and yet there's a sense of who he is, and where he's going, and how bad things will be when he gets there..." -John Phillips
https://www.facebook.com/notes/john-phillips/a-poem-a-day-9/129690318737
Good work from J.P.

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