Discussion:
NASHVILLE - great moments from that film
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Zod The Mighty
2019-11-01 01:26:17 UTC
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Here is just one great scene from NASHVILLE.....



Nashville (1975) - "Since You've Gone"

************This beautiful song, performed by the fictional folk trio Tom, Bill and Mary in Robert Altman's "Nashville" was written for the film by Gary Busey**************
Will Dockery
2019-11-01 11:34:13 UTC
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Post by Zod The Mighty
Here is just one great scene from NASHVILLE.....
http://youtu.be/NToTcTiX66g
Nashville (1975) - "Since You've Gone"
************This beautiful song, performed by the fictional folk trio Tom, Bill and Mary in Robert Altman's "Nashville" was written for the film by Gary Busey**************
True, the scope of commentary, satire and pastiche of the Country Music scene of the mid-1970s is astonishing, in this film.
Z***@none.i2p
2019-11-01 12:05:49 UTC
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Will Dockery wrote on Fri, 01 November 2019 11:34
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Zod The Mighty
Here is just one great scene from NASHVILLE.....
http://youtu.be/NToTcTiX66g
Nashville (1975) - "Since You've Gone"
************This beautiful song, performed by the fictional folk trio Tom, Bill and Mary in Robert Altman's "Nashville" was written for the film by Gary Busey**************
True, the scope of commentary, satire and pastiche of the Country Music scene of the mid-1970s is astonishing, in this film.
You nailed it, Doc.........
Z***@none.i2p
2019-11-01 17:49:17 UTC
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Here is just one great scene from NASHVILLE.....[/color
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Zod The Mighty
http://youtu.be/NToTcTiX66g
Nashville (1975) - "Since You've Gone"
************This beautiful song, performed by the fictional folk trio Tom, Bill and Mary in Robert Altman's "Nashville" was written for the film by Gary Busey**************
True, the scope of commentary, satire and pastiche of the Country Music scene of the mid-1970s is astonishing, in this film.
Right from the start we have sad NASHVILLE had elements of satire, Pen.
Michael Pendragon
2019-11-01 18:08:06 UTC
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Post by Z***@none.i2p
Here is just one great scene from NASHVILLE.....[/color
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Zod The Mighty
http://youtu.be/NToTcTiX66g
Nashville (1975) - "Since You've Gone"
************This beautiful song, performed by the fictional folk trio Tom, Bill and Mary in Robert Altman's "Nashville" was written for the film by Gary Busey**************
True, the scope of commentary, satire and pastiche of the Country Music scene of the mid-1970s is astonishing, in this film.
Right from the start we have sad NASHVILLE had elements of satire, Pen.
No, I'd first explained that to you two days ago.

Now, if the music is what makes the film great (your claim), shouldn't like it as least as much when excerpted from the film?
Michael Pendragon
2019-11-01 18:37:46 UTC
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Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Zod The Mighty
http://youtu.be/NToTcTiX66g
Nashville (1975) - "Since You've Gone"
************This beautiful song, performed by the fictional folk trio Tom, Bill and Mary in Robert Altman's "Nashville" was written for the film by Gary Busey**************
True, the scope of commentary, satire and pastiche of the Country Music scene of the mid-1970s is astonishing, in this film.
Now, if the music is what makes the film great (your claim), shouldn't like it as least as much when excerpted from the film?
The soundtrack to "Nashville" is actually highly regarded by critics.
Satire generally is. So what?
General Zod
2019-11-03 03:19:39 UTC
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Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Zod The Mighty
http://youtu.be/NToTcTiX66g
Nashville (1975) - "Since You've Gone"
************This beautiful song, performed by the fictional folk trio Tom, Bill and Mary in Robert Altman's "Nashville" was written for the film by Gary Busey**************
True, the scope of commentary, satire and pastiche of the Country Music scene of the mid-1970s is astonishing, in this film.
Now, if the music is what makes the film great (your claim), shouldn't like it as least as much when excerpted from the film?
The soundtrack to "Nashville" is actually highly regarded by critics.
Satire generally is. So what?
So, the movie is damn good and you are wrong yet again.....
Coco DeSockmonkey
2019-11-03 07:34:41 UTC
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Post by General Zod
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Zod The Mighty
http://youtu.be/NToTcTiX66g
Nashville (1975) - "Since You've Gone"
************This beautiful song, performed by the fictional folk trio Tom, Bill and Mary in Robert Altman's "Nashville" was written for the film by Gary Busey**************
True, the scope of commentary, satire and pastiche of the Country Music scene of the mid-1970s is astonishing, in this film.
Now, if the music is what makes the film great (your claim), shouldn't like it as least as much when excerpted from the film?
The soundtrack to "Nashville" is actually highly regarded by critics.
Satire generally is. So what?
So, the movie is damn good and you are wrong yet again.....
So far, the only argument you've made for the film was to say that it's the music that makes the film great. And, so far, you've refused to admit that a thirty minute version of the film containing only the musical performances would be at least as good as the three hour soap opera they were introduced in.

Would you like to retract your statement?
Z***@none.i2p
2019-11-03 08:35:01 UTC
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Coco DeSockmonkey wrote on Sun, 03 November 2019 07:34
Post by Coco DeSockmonkey
Post by General Zod
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Zod The Mighty
http://youtu.be/NToTcTiX66g
Nashville (1975) - "Since You've Gone"
************This beautiful song, performed by the fictional folk trio Tom, Bill and Mary in Robert Altman's "Nashville" was written for the film by Gary Busey**************
True, the scope of commentary, satire and pastiche of the Country Music scene of the mid-1970s is astonishing, in this film.
Now, if the music is what makes the film great (your claim), shouldn't like it as least as much when excerpted from the film?
The soundtrack to "Nashville" is actually highly regarded by critics.
Satire generally is. So what?
So, the movie is damn good and you are wrong yet again.....
a thirty minute version of the film containing only the musical performances
Oh, there is much more than thirty minutes of music in NASH VILLE....
General Zod
2019-11-01 21:29:04 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Post by Zod The Mighty
Here is just one great scene from NASHVILLE.....
http://youtu.be/NToTcTiX66g
Nashville (1975) - "Since You've Gone"
************This beautiful song, performed by the fictional folk trio Tom, Bill and Mary in Robert Altman's "Nashville" was written for the film by Gary Busey**************
True, the scope of commentary, satire and pastiche of the Country Music scene of the mid-1970s is astonishing, in this film.
https://pitchfork.com/thepitch/153-revisiting-the-strange-and-wonderful-soundtrack-to-robert-altmans-nashville/

Revisiting the Strange and Wonderful Soundtrack to Robert Altman's Nashville

**************The original vinyl edition of the Nashville soundtrack—which remains a curious artifact of 70s cinema as well as a surprisingly sturdy album in its own right—includes no definitive tracklist on the back cover, so the tracklist remains vague and disarrayed. In addition to thirteen songs from the movie, the album also includes the artist introductions and between-song banter, often going out of its way to suggest that the character, not the actor, is performing the tune****************

**************Keith Carradine, who won an Oscar for his ballad of sexual gamesmanship, "I’m Easy", played that song and another original, "It Don’t Worry Me", for Altman on the set of his 1974 movie Thieves Like Us. Ronee Blakely penned "Dues" and "Bluebird" not for her emotionally fragile character Barbara Jean, but for her own 1972 self-titled album; her songs "Tapedeck" and "Idaho Home" are included on her follow-up, Welcome, released the same year as Nashville. Even Karen Black, who had appeared in Easy Rider and Five Easy Pieces and was one of the better-known actor-singers in the cast, had written her two songs, "Memphis" and "Rolling Stone"*************
General Zod
2019-11-02 21:26:57 UTC
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Post by General Zod
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Zod The Mighty
Here is just one great scene from NASHVILLE.....
http://youtu.be/NToTcTiX66g
Nashville (1975) - "Since You've Gone"
************This beautiful song, performed by the fictional folk trio Tom, Bill and Mary in Robert Altman's "Nashville" was written for the film by Gary Busey**************
True, the scope of commentary, satire and pastiche of the Country Music scene of the mid-1970s is astonishing, in this film.
https://pitchfork.com/thepitch/153-revisiting-the-strange-and-wonderful-soundtrack-to-robert-altmans-nashville/
Revisiting the Strange and Wonderful Soundtrack to Robert Altman's Nashville
**************The original vinyl edition of the Nashville soundtrack—which remains a curious artifact of 70s cinema as well as a surprisingly sturdy album in its own right—includes no definitive tracklist on the back cover, so the tracklist remains vague and disarrayed. In addition to thirteen songs from the movie, the album also includes the artist introductions and between-song banter, often going out of its way to suggest that the character, not the actor, is performing the tune****************
**************Keith Carradine, who won an Oscar for his ballad of sexual gamesmanship, "I’m Easy", played that song and another original, "It Don’t Worry Me", for Altman on the set of his 1974 movie Thieves Like Us. Ronee Blakely penned "Dues" and "Bluebird" not for her emotionally fragile character Barbara Jean, but for her own 1972 self-titled album; her songs "Tapedeck" and "Idaho Home" are included on her follow-up, Welcome, released the same year as Nashville. Even Karen Black, who had appeared in Easy Rider and Five Easy Pieces and was one of the better-known actor-singers in the cast, had written her two songs, "Memphis" and "Rolling Stone"*************
And oh golly.... Karen Black.....


Z***@none.i2p
2019-11-04 06:36:38 UTC
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Will Dockery wrote on Fri, 01 November 2019 11:34
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Zod The Mighty
Here is just one great scene from NASHVILLE.....
http://youtu.be/NToTcTiX66g
Nashville (1975) - "Since You've Gone"
************This beautiful song, performed by the fictional folk trio Tom, Bill and Mary in Robert Altman's "Nashville" was written for the film by Gary Busey**************
True, the scope of commentary, satire and pastiche of the Country Music scene of the mid-1970s is astonishing, in this film.
That pretty much says it all..........

Otherwise, the viewer must see and hear it for himself.......
Z***@none.i2p
2019-11-05 02:08:07 UTC
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Will Dockery wrote on Fri, 01 November 2019 11:34
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Zod The Mighty
Here is just one great scene from NASHVILLE.....
http://youtu.be/NToTcTiX66g
Nashville (1975) - "Since You've Gone"
************This beautiful song, performed by the fictional folk trio Tom, Bill and Mary in Robert Altman's "Nashville" was written for the film by Gary Busey**************
True, the scope of commentary, satire and pastiche of the Country Music scene of the mid-1970s is astonishing, in this film.


**********************************************************

criterion collection

Those are our three reasons. What are yours?

Out now: www.criterion.com/films/28427-nashville

*********************************************************
General Zod
2019-11-05 09:14:21 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Post by Zod The Mighty
Here is just one great scene from NASHVILLE.....
http://youtu.be/NToTcTiX66g
Nashville (1975) - "Since You've Gone"
************This beautiful song, performed by the fictional folk trio Tom, Bill and Mary in Robert Altman's "Nashville" was written for the film by Gary Busey**************
True, the scope of commentary, satire and pastiche of the Country Music scene of the mid-1970s is astonishing, in this film.
Here is the big hit of the movie.... won all kinds of awards and was on the radio non-stop in that time....



I'm Easy - Keith Carradine
General Zod
2019-11-19 07:57:28 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Post by Zod The Mighty
Here is just one great scene from NASHVILLE.....
http://youtu.be/NToTcTiX66g
Nashville (1975) - "Since You've Gone"
************This beautiful song, performed by the fictional folk trio Tom, Bill and Mary in Robert Altman's "Nashville" was written for the film by Gary Busey**************
True, the scope of commentary, satire and pastiche of the Country Music scene of the mid-1970s is astonishing, in this film.
Exactly.....
Michael Pendragon
2019-11-01 16:10:11 UTC
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For Pen, who must have missed this one..........
If I found the film boring, why should I find clips from it less so?
Will Dockery
2019-11-01 16:33:02 UTC
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Post by Michael Pendragon
If I found the film boring
So, you probably don't enjoy Country music, so you were bored by the references and the soundtrack.

No surprise, really.
Michael Pendragon
2019-11-01 17:44:41 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
If I found the film boring
So, you probably don't enjoy Country music, so you were bored by the references and the soundtrack.
No surprise, really.
The soundtrack of "Nashville" wasn't country music, but a satire of the same. For example:

"It don’t worry me
It don’t worry me
You may say that I ain’t free
But it don’t worry me"

Each of the above lines is grammatically incorrect. The lyrics can be read in two ways: overtly as a statement of one's faith in Democracy, the United States of America, etc.; whereas the barely hidden message is that while the country may be going to hell in a handcart, the rednecks are going to turn a blind eye to it and happily sing their jingoistic songs like this.

As to country music, I have a large collection of it on my ipod: Jim Reeves, Patsy Cline, Eddy Arnold, Johnny Cash, Tennessee Ernie Ford, Brenda Lee, LeAnn Rimes, Emmylou Harris, Sonny James, Crystal Gayle, Marty Robbins, Wanda Jackson, Kitty Wells, et al., along with country albums by Patti Page, Kay Starr, Frankie Laine, Kitty Kallen, and others.
General Zod
2019-11-22 23:52:36 UTC
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Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
If I found the film boring
So, you probably don't enjoy Country music, so you were bored by the references and the soundtrack.
No surprise, really.
The soundtrack of "Nashville" wasn't country music
It is a basis of what evolved into the New Country of 20 years later.....
Michael Pendragon
2019-11-23 03:26:06 UTC
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Post by General Zod
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
If I found the film boring
So, you probably don't enjoy Country music, so you were bored by the references and the soundtrack.
No surprise, really.
The soundtrack of "Nashville" wasn't country music
It is a basis of what evolved into the New Country of 20 years later.....
Which "New Country" artists based their musical style on "Nashville," Stink?
Z***@none.i2p
2019-11-01 17:31:37 UTC
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Michael Pendragon wrote on Fri, 01 November 2019 16:10
Post by Michael Pendragon
For Pen, who must have missed this one..........
If I found the film boring
The same problem I have with having to listen to Pat Boone and Tiny Tim.....
Will Dockery
2019-11-03 21:23:17 UTC
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I'd call the movie a Musical, really.
General Zod
2019-11-03 22:16:15 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
I'd call the movie a Musical, really.
Wikipedia says it's a "satirical musical ensemble comedy-drama," which pretty much covers all bases... but what has that got to do with the price of tea in China?
I do not dispute that..............

It also is a Robert Altman masterpiece............
Michelangelo Scarlotti
2019-11-03 23:02:56 UTC
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Post by General Zod
Post by Will Dockery
I'd call the movie a Musical, really.
Wikipedia says it's a "satirical musical ensemble comedy-drama," which pretty much covers all bases... but what has that got to do with the price of tea in China?
I do not dispute that..............
It also is a Robert Altman masterpiece............
Again, calling it a "masterpiece" tells me nothing apart from the fact that you like it.

What makes it a masterpiece?

Since you've already said that the musical performances make it great, we can assume that they make it a masterpiece as well.

Therefore, wouldn't it be at least as much of a masterpiece if it consisted only of the musical performances?
ME
2019-11-03 23:10:13 UTC
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Post by Michelangelo Scarlotti
Post by General Zod
Post by Will Dockery
I'd call the movie a Musical, really.
Wikipedia says it's a "satirical musical ensemble comedy-drama," which pretty much covers all bases... but what has that got to do with the price of tea in China?
I do not dispute that..............
It also is a Robert Altman masterpiece............
Again, calling it a "masterpiece" tells me nothing apart from the fact that you like it.
What makes it a masterpiece?
Since you've already said that the musical performances make it great, we can assume that they make it a masterpiece as well.
Therefore, wouldn't it be at least as much of a masterpiece if it consisted only of the musical performances?
Why are the shitkickerville twits making such a big deal about a 44 year old movie that no one can remember? Or really gives a damn about?

It’s just something one of them found on a newsfeed and googled.
Who the fuck cares?!
Will Dockery
2019-11-04 04:10:34 UTC
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Post by ME
Why
making such a big deal about a 44 year old movie that no one can remember
No, you can't remember the movie. Most of the rest of us can remember it:

https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/nashville

Molly Haskell sums it up well, to me:

"I think that the power and the theme of the film lie in the fact that while some characters are more "major" than others, they are all subordinated to the music itself. It's like a river, running through the film, running through their life..."
Michael Pendragon
2019-11-04 04:32:06 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Post by ME
Why
making such a big deal about a 44 year old movie that no one can remember
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/nashville
"I think that the power and the theme of the film lie in the fact that while some characters are more "major" than others, they are all subordinated to the music itself. It's like a river, running through the film, running through their life..."
Why can't you express your own opinion of the film, Will?

The fact that you've googled a positive review by Molly Haskell (on Rotten Tomatoes: https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/nashville), doesn't tell me what you thought of the film.

Are you capable of expressing an original thought?

Are you capable of having one?
Will Dockery
2019-11-04 04:37:12 UTC
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Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/nashville
"I think that the power and the theme of the film lie in the fact that while some characters are more "major" than others, they are all subordinated to the music itself. It's like a river, running through the film, running through their life..."
Why can't you express your own opinion of the film, Will
I've given my opinion several times, here's one:

"The scope of commentary, satire and pastiche of the Country Music scene of the mid-1970s is astonishing, in this film." -Will Dockery
Michael Pendragon
2019-11-04 04:55:00 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/nashville
"I think that the power and the theme of the film lie in the fact that while some characters are more "major" than others, they are all subordinated to the music itself. It's like a river, running through the film, running through their life..."
Why can't you express your own opinion of the film, Will
"The scope of commentary, satire and pastiche of the Country Music scene of the mid-1970s is astonishing, in this film." -Will Dockery
What is that really saying? You're identifying the film as a satire, a commentary and a pastiche.

First off, a satire would necessarily be both a commentary on its subject and a pastiche of it.

So you're really just identifying the film as a satire on the Country Music business of the mid-1970s.

Let's ignore that fact that I'd said the same thing several days earlier, and point out that simply identifying a film as a "satire," or a "musical," or a "wetern," or a "horror" film, doesn't constitute one's opinion of that "satire"/"musical"/"western"/"horror" film.

Apart from identifying the film's genre (or one element of its genre), you said that its "scope" was "astonishing."

Its scope is just its field of vision, or the amount of targets it aims its satiric barbs at. That this field astonished you, is meaningless to the rest of us. How wide a scope astonishes you, may not astonish someone with a greater understanding of satire in general and/or satirical film in particular.

But let's put the two portions of your statement back together: Nashville is a satire with an astonishingly wide range of targets.

Again, that's simply identifying what the film is.

Now tell me your opinions regarding this satirical film with an astonishingly wide range of targets.
Will Dockery
2019-11-04 04:57:49 UTC
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https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/nashville
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
"I think that the power and the theme of the film lie in the fact that while some characters are more "major" than others, they are all subordinated to the music itself. It's like a river, running through the film, running through their life..."
"The scope of commentary, satire and pastiche of the Country Music scene of the mid-1970s is astonishing, in this film." -Will Dockery
What is that really saying? You're identifying the film as a satire, a commentary and a pastiche
Yes, without you putting words in my mouth, that's what I get from the film.

;)
Michael Pendragon
2019-11-04 14:09:00 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/nashville
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
"I think that the power and the theme of the film lie in the fact that while some characters are more "major" than others, they are all subordinated to the music itself. It's like a river, running through the film, running through their life..."
"The scope of commentary, satire and pastiche of the Country Music scene of the mid-1970s is astonishing, in this film." -Will Dockery
What is that really saying? You're identifying the film as a satire, a commentary and a pastiche
Yes, without you putting words in my mouth, that's what I get from the film.
So... the only thing you get from a given film is the ability to identify its genre?

If I asked you what you got from "The Searchers," would you say that it was a western?

If I asked you what you got from "The Seventh Seal," would you say that it was a foreign film? (Or that you read it like a comic book?)

"Nashville" is a satire on the Country Music industry. "Dr. Strangelove" is a satire on the arms race. "The Great Dictator" is a satire on Hitler.

They could be great satires or unsuccessful satires. They could be great films or lousy films.

There are various elements in "Strangelove" that work for me; just as there are various elements "Nashville" that don't.

If I were to review "Strangelove," I wouldn't just say that it was well written, photographed, acted and directed. If I like the film, one can assume that I was impressed by its writing, acting, direction and photography.

Nor would I say that I liked the concept of a cowboy riding an nuclear bomb as though it were a bucking bronco. This is merely pointing out a scene from the film and saying that I liked it. And again, if I like the film, one can assume that I liked the individual scenes in it as well.

In writing a review, one states what both the individual scenes, and the film as a whole, *meant* to them. For me, "Strangelove's" brilliance is in how it subversively forces us (the audience members) to adopt the same twisted world outlook of its characters. For example: Kubrick presents the crew of the airplane in a heroic manner (with recognizable patriotic songs playing on the soundtrack) and has us rooting for the plane to get through the Russian defenses and drop the bomb -- even though we know that in doing so it will cause Russia's "Doomsday Machine" to trigger, effectively destroying life on earth. Or, how when "Strangelove" elaborates his plan for a post-apocalyptic society where the women are selected for the breeding potential (physical attractiveness) and that there will be 50 women for every man (I forget the actual number), the male audience members are thinking that it sounds pretty damn good. Or how when the montage of atomic explosions (from actual newsreel footage) are shown over Vera Lynn's recording of "We'll Meet Again," we find ourselves enjoying the spectacle rather than feeling afraid.

And in making the audience identify with the twisted perspectives of its characters, Kubrick drives home just how very real the threat of nuclear annihilation is; after all, we can see ourselves acting exactly like the characters on the screen -- and with the same motivations. IOW: Kubrick forces us to recognize our own human nature: our equation of sex with power (military or personal), and our innate tendencies to be selfish, childish, lust-driven apes.

"Nashville," otoh, merely contrasted the reality of the industry (psychologically unstable, drug addicted, callous performers/producers) with the public image (God-fearing, wholesome Americans), and did so with all the subtlety of a sledgehammer. Altman's taking pot shots at an industry is lazy satire that pales before the subversive manipulation of Kubrick's film.

If, however, you found a deeper level of meaning in Altman's film than I, this is where you would explain that meaning. And your explanation of that meaning is what makes for an actual "critique"/"review"/"opinion."
Will Dockery
2019-11-04 17:00:21 UTC
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https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/nashville
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
"I think that the power and the theme of the film lie in the fact that while some characters are more "major" than others, they are all subordinated to the music itself. It's like a river, running through the film, running through their life..."
"The scope of commentary, satire and pastiche of the Country Music scene of the mid-1970s is astonishing, in this film." -Will Dockery
<snip for focus>
Post by Michael Pendragon
"Nashville," otoh, merely contrasted the reality of the industry (psychologically unstable, drug addicted, callous performers/producers) with the public image (God-fearing, wholesome Americans), and did so with all the subtlety of a sledgehammer. Altman's taking pot shots at an industry is lazy satire
You just fast-forward through all the music performances in the film, don't you?
Michael Pendragon
2019-11-04 17:16:09 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/nashville
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
"I think that the power and the theme of the film lie in the fact that while some characters are more "major" than others, they are all subordinated to the music itself. It's like a river, running through the film, running through their life..."
"The scope of commentary, satire and pastiche of the Country Music scene of the mid-1970s is astonishing, in this film." -Will Dockery
<snip for focus>
Post by Michael Pendragon
"Nashville," otoh, merely contrasted the reality of the industry (psychologically unstable, drug addicted, callous performers/producers) with the public image (God-fearing, wholesome Americans), and did so with all the subtlety of a sledgehammer. Altman's taking pot shots at an industry is lazy satire
You just fast-forward through all the music performances in the film, don't you?
I only watch uncut films, and I watch them all the way though until the last end credit has finished and the projector shuts off. I have never fast-forwarded through any film.

But what is your point? That you and Stink consider "Nashville" to be primarily a music film, and that it's the musical performances that make the movie great?

If so, I can only ask once again if an abbreviated version of the film consisting solely of the musical performances would not therefore be at least as great.
Will Dockery
2019-11-04 17:30:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/nashville
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
"I think that the power and the theme of the film lie in the fact that while some characters are more "major" than others, they are all subordinated to the music itself. It's like a river, running through the film, running through their life..."
"The scope of commentary, satire and pastiche of the Country Music scene of the mid-1970s is astonishing, in this film." -Will Dockery
<snip for focus>
Post by Michael Pendragon
But what is your point? That you
consider "Nashville" to be primarily a music film, and that it's the
musical performances that make the movie great?
The unique songs and performances are what bring me back to the film, not the dated political commentary/satire, yes.
Michael Pendragon
2019-11-04 19:28:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/nashville
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
"I think that the power and the theme of the film lie in the fact that while some characters are more "major" than others, they are all subordinated to the music itself. It's like a river, running through the film, running through their life..."
"The scope of commentary, satire and pastiche of the Country Music scene of the mid-1970s is astonishing, in this film." -Will Dockery
<snip for focus>
Post by Michael Pendragon
But what is your point? That you
consider "Nashville" to be primarily a music film, and that it's the
musical performances that make the movie great?
The unique songs and performances are what bring me back to the film, not the dated political commentary/satire, yes.
Good. I'll take that "yes" as an agreement that you would find an abbreviated version of the film consisting solely of the musical performances to be at least as good.

That admission doesn't negate your enjoyment of the film, whereas it supports my negative opinion of the film as a whole. It also begs the question of what constitutes a "great" film -- more specifically, can a film be great if people only watch it for the songs?

Has it dated as satire? It has for you. It never worked as satire for me to begin with, so I would no doubt find it as dull today as I did the last time I watched it (ca. 1985).

In support of the film's story/commentary/satire, it won a truckload of Oscars and was hailed as a masterpiece by the vast majority of critics. I am well aware that my dislike of the film places me in a decided minority, and will be held as controversial by its many fans.

But as you're willing to admit that the film's primary attraction, for you, is the music, there's no need for us to debate its other supposed merits.
Will Dockery
2019-11-04 19:39:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/nashville
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
"I think that the power and the theme of the film lie in the fact that while some characters are more "major" than others, they are all subordinated to the music itself. It's like a river, running through the film, running through their life..."
"The scope of commentary, satire and pastiche of the Country Music scene of the mid-1970s is astonishing, in this film." -Will Dockery
<snip for focus>
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
The unique songs and performances are what bring me back to the film, not the dated political commentary/satire, yes.
Good. I'll take that "yes" as an agreement that you would find an abbreviated version of the film consisting solely of the musical performances to be at least as good.
No, because the movie is /about/ the characters singing the songs.

As I stated, I own two copies on DVD (different editions, different cover art), it is one of my favorite movies, as Robert Altman is also a favorite director of mine.
Michael Pendragon
2019-11-04 20:15:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/nashville
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
"I think that the power and the theme of the film lie in the fact that while some characters are more "major" than others, they are all subordinated to the music itself. It's like a river, running through the film, running through their life..."
"The scope of commentary, satire and pastiche of the Country Music scene of the mid-1970s is astonishing, in this film." -Will Dockery
<snip for focus>
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
The unique songs and performances are what bring me back to the film, not the dated political commentary/satire, yes.
Good. I'll take that "yes" as an agreement that you would find an abbreviated version of the film consisting solely of the musical performances to be at least as good.
No, because the movie is /about/ the characters singing the songs.
As I stated, I own two copies on DVD (different editions, different cover art), it is one of my favorite movies, as Robert Altman is also a favorite director of mine.
Then tell me what (aside from the music) makes it a great film.

NOTE: You've already admitted that as a satire/commentary it's badly dated.
Z***@none.i2p
2019-11-06 15:16:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Michael Pendragon wrote on Mon, 04 November 2019 20:15
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/nashville
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
"I think that the power and the theme of the film lie in the fact that while some characters are more "major" than others, they are all subordinated to the music itself. It's like a river, running through the film, running through their life..."
"The scope of commentary, satire and pastiche of the Country Music scene of the mid-1970s is astonishing, in this film." -Will Dockery
<snip for focus>
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
The unique songs and performances are what bring me back to the film, not the dated political commentary/satire, yes.
Good. I'll take that "yes" as an agreement that you would find an abbreviated version of the film consisting solely of the musical performances to be at least as good.
No, because the movie is /about/ the characters singing the songs.
As I stated, I own two copies on DVD (different editions, different cover art), it is one of my favorite movies, as Robert Altman is also a favorite director of mine.
Then tell me what (aside from the music) makes it a great film
I find that the music is the most enjoyable part of the movie.....
Michael Pendragon
2019-11-06 18:39:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Z***@none.i2p
Michael Pendragon wrote on Mon, 04 November 2019 20:15
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/nashville
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
"I think that the power and the theme of the film lie in the fact that while some characters are more "major" than others, they are all subordinated to the music itself. It's like a river, running through the film, running through their life..."
"The scope of commentary, satire and pastiche of the Country Music scene of the mid-1970s is astonishing, in this film." -Will Dockery
<snip for focus>
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
The unique songs and performances are what bring me back to the film, not the dated political commentary/satire, yes.
Good. I'll take that "yes" as an agreement that you would find an abbreviated version of the film consisting solely of the musical performances to be at least as good.
No, because the movie is /about/ the characters singing the songs.
As I stated, I own two copies on DVD (different editions, different cover art), it is one of my favorite movies, as Robert Altman is also a favorite director of mine.
Then tell me what (aside from the music) makes it a great film
I find that the music is the most enjoyable part of the movie.....
So an hour long, music only edit would be at least as enjoyable to you as the three hour film in its entirety. Correct?
Z***@none.i2p
2019-11-06 22:17:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Michael Pendragon wrote on Wed, 06 November 2019 18:39
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Z***@none.i2p
Michael Pendragon wrote on Mon, 04 November 2019 20:15
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/nashville
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
"I think that the power and the theme of the film lie in the fact that while some characters are more "major" than others, they are all subordinated to the music itself. It's like a river, running through the film, running through their life..."
"The scope of commentary, satire and pastiche of the Country Music scene of the mid-1970s is astonishing, in this film." -Will Dockery
<snip for focus>
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
The unique songs and performances are what bring me back to the film, not the dated political commentary/satire, yes.
Good. I'll take that "yes" as an agreement that you would find an abbreviated version of the film consisting solely of the musical performances to be at least as good.
No, because the movie is /about/ the characters singing the songs.
As I stated, I own two copies on DVD (different editions, different cover art), it is one of my favorite movies, as Robert Altman is also a favorite director of mine.
Then tell me what (aside from the music) makes it a great film
I find that the music is the most enjoyable part of the movie.....
So an hour long, music only edit
I watch the version the director preferred.....
Michael Pendragon
2019-11-07 02:13:10 UTC
Reply
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Post by Z***@none.i2p
Michael Pendragon wrote on Wed, 06 November 2019 18:39
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Z***@none.i2p
Michael Pendragon wrote on Mon, 04 November 2019 20:15
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/nashville
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
"I think that the power and the theme of the film lie in the fact that while some characters are more "major" than others, they are all subordinated to the music itself. It's like a river, running through the film, running through their life..."
"The scope of commentary, satire and pastiche of the Country Music scene of the mid-1970s is astonishing, in this film." -Will Dockery
<snip for focus>
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
The unique songs and performances are what bring me back to the film, not the dated political commentary/satire, yes.
Good. I'll take that "yes" as an agreement that you would find an abbreviated version of the film consisting solely of the musical performances to be at least as good.
No, because the movie is /about/ the characters singing the songs.
As I stated, I own two copies on DVD (different editions, different cover art), it is one of my favorite movies, as Robert Altman is also a favorite director of mine.
Then tell me what (aside from the music) makes it a great film
I find that the music is the most enjoyable part of the movie.....
So an hour long, music only edit
I watch the version the director preferred.....
You watch the only version that there is.

I didn't ask you what you watch.

I asked if an hour long edit featuring only the music would be at least as enjoyable as the film.
Zod The Mighty
2019-11-07 02:23:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/nashville
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
"I think that the power and the theme of the film lie in the fact that while some characters are more "major" than others, they are all subordinated to the music itself. It's like a river, running through the film, running through their life..."
"The scope of commentary, satire and pastiche of the Country Music scene of the mid-1970s is astonishing, in this film." -Will Dockery
I asked if an hour long edit featuring only the music would be at least as enjoyable as the film.
I would enjoy watching that for a change, yes...…..
General Zod
2019-11-08 00:43:45 UTC
Reply
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Post by Michael Pendragon
I asked if an hour long edit featuring only the music
That would be interesting yes................



Barbara Harris - It Don't Worry Me
Z***@none.i2p
2019-11-14 02:58:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I asked if an hour long edit featuring only the music[/color
Post by General Zod
That would be interesting yes................
http://youtu.be/4BYyDusJYJo
Barbara Harris - It Don't Worry Me
Lovely song.......
Me
2019-11-04 20:22:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/nashville
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
"I think that the power and the theme of the film lie in the fact that while some characters are more "major" than others, they are all subordinated to the music itself. It's like a river, running through the film, running through their life..."
"The scope of commentary, satire and pastiche of the Country Music scene of the mid-1970s is astonishing, in this film." -Will Dockery
<snip for focus>
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
The unique songs and performances are what bring me back to the film, not the dated political commentary/satire, yes.
Good. I'll take that "yes" as an agreement that you would find an abbreviated version of the film consisting solely of the musical performances to be at least as good.
No, because the movie is /about/ the characters singing the songs.
As I stated, I own two copies on DVD (different editions, different cover art), it is one of my favorite movies, as Robert Altman is also a favorite director of mine.
Wow. You own two copies of this on DVD?
And Altman is a favorite director?
Then you must have an insightful critique and review/take on Nashville.
Please enlighten us.
Will Dockery
2019-11-04 20:26:22 UTC
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Post by Me
And Altman is a favorite director?
Yes, are you familiar with any of his films?
Me
2019-11-04 20:33:40 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Me
And Altman is a favorite director?
Yes, are you familiar with any of his films?
Only a few.
But I asked you.
Michael Pendragon
2019-11-04 21:12:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Me
And Altman is a favorite director?
Yes, are you familiar with any of his films?
I've seen 4:

MASH
Buffalo Bill & the Indians
Nashville
The Player

"The Player" was watchable, more for the old Hollywood cameos than the story. The others were terrible.

How many Altman films have you seen?
Will Dockery
2019-11-04 21:24:39 UTC
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Post by Michael Pendragon
How many Altman films have you seen?
Several... I think "McCabe & Mrs. Miller" is his best:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/McCabe_%26_Mrs._Miller
Michael Pendragon
2019-11-04 21:41:10 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
How many Altman films have you seen?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/McCabe_%26_Mrs._Miller
How many is several? Three?

"Mcabe & Mrs. Miller," "MASH" and "Nashville"?
Brother Dave Dockery
2019-11-04 20:18:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/nashville
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
"I think that the power and the theme of the film lie in the fact that while some characters are more "major" than others, they are all subordinated to the music itself. It's like a river, running through the film, running through their life..."
"The scope of commentary, satire and pastiche of the Country Music scene of the mid-1970s is astonishing, in this film." -Will Dockery
What is that really saying? You're identifying the film as a satire, a commentary and a pastiche
Yes, without you putting words in my mouth
You already have Sulzbach's little dick in your mouth. There is plenty of room left.
Will Dockery
2019-11-03 23:34:16 UTC
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Permalink
Ask Pendragon, he'š the one whining about it.

;)
Me
2019-11-03 23:48:48 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Ask Pendragon, he'š the one whining about it.
;)
Will:
show quoted text -
True, the scope of commentary, satire and pastiche of the Country Music scene of the mid-1970s is astonishing, in this film.

As I said..... who the fuck cares.
Z***@none.i2p
2019-11-04 00:52:31 UTC
Reply
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Me[9
Post by Me
Post by Will Dockery
Ask Pendragon, he'š the one whining about it.
;)
show quoted text -
True, the scope of commentary, satire and pastiche of the Country Music scene of the mid-1970s is astonishing, in this film.
As I said..... who the fuck cares.
If you don't care why bother to post, except for the fact that you love to whine.....?
Will Dockery
2019-11-04 00:40:16 UTC
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It it doesn't intetest you, skip this thread.

;)
Brother Dave Dockery
2019-11-04 20:22:53 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
It it doesn't intetest
Got a stutter there, Brother Will? Intetesting.
ME
2019-11-04 19:41:12 UTC
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Post by Zod The Mighty
Here is just one great scene from NASHVILLE.....
http://youtu.be/NToTcTiX66g
Nashville (1975) - "Since You've Gone"
************This beautiful song, performed by the fictional folk trio Tom, Bill and Mary in Robert Altman's "Nashville" was written for the film by Gary Busey**************
So this was just another drunken post by a drunk who hit the wrong keys and hit upon this subject.
Duh....
General Zod
2019-11-05 00:45:01 UTC
Reply
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Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
How many Altman films have you seen?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/McCabe_%26_Mrs._Miller
How many is several? Three?
"Mcabe & Mrs. Miller," "MASH" and "Nashville"?
Those, and "Popeye", "The Long Goodbye", "Tanner '88", off the top of my head, with a couple more I'm sure.
I've seen M*A*S*H at least a dozen times or more.......

I liked the sort of sequel also..................

Gould and Sutherland team up again.....



**********The idea of teaming Donald Sutherland and Elliot Gould together in a movie must have seemed like a good idea after their success with MASH**************
Michael Pendragon
2019-11-05 03:17:41 UTC
Reply
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Post by General Zod
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
How many Altman films have you seen?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/McCabe_%26_Mrs._Miller
How many is several? Three?
"Mcabe & Mrs. Miller," "MASH" and "Nashville"?
Those, and "Popeye", "The Long Goodbye", "Tanner '88", off the top of my head, with a couple more I'm sure.
I've seen M*A*S*H at least a dozen times or more.......
Why?
Z***@none.i2p
2019-11-05 03:29:03 UTC
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Permalink
Because M*A*S*H is s good film......

Knowing you, you probably prefer the television version......
Michelangelo Scarlotti
2019-11-05 04:06:41 UTC
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Post by Z***@none.i2p
Because M*A*S*H is s good film......
Knowing you, you probably prefer the television version......
Certainly. The television version had its problems, too, but it was better written and acted than the film -- and Hawkeye and Trapper were far less obnoxious.
Will Dockery
2019-11-06 09:33:06 UTC
Reply
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Post by Michelangelo Scarlotti
Post by Z***@none.i2p
Because M*A*S*H is s good film......
Knowing you, you probably prefer the television version......
Certainly. The television version had its problems, too, but it was better written and acted than the film -- and Hawkeye and Trapper were far less obnoxious.
"Winchester did embody some antagonistic qualities... he proved over the course of his time on the series to be a very different character than his predecessor, being far more intelligent, humane and kind."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_M*A*S*H_characters#Charles_Winchester
Z***@none.i2p
2019-11-06 10:11:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Will Dockery wrote on Wed, 06 November 2019 09:33
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michelangelo Scarlotti
Post by Z***@none.i2p
Because M*A*S*H is s good film......
Knowing you, you probably prefer the television version......
Certainly. The television version had its problems, too, but it was better written and acted than the film -- and Hawkeye and Trapper were far less obnoxious.
"Winchester did embody some antagonistic qualities... he proved over the course of his time on the series to be a very different character than his predecessor, being far more intelligent, humane and kind."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_M*A*S*H_characters#Charles_Winchester
Nah..... Robert Duvall as Frank Burns was much better than the sniveling Winchester....



MASH (2/5) Movie CLIP - Sayonara to Frank Burns (1970)
Will Dockery
2019-11-05 03:36:54 UTC
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Permalink
Good Lord, Pendragon... you don't even like M*A*S*H?
Michelangelo Scarlotti
2019-11-05 04:35:52 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Good Lord, Pendragon... you don't even like M*A*S*H?
Here's a much better film about a MASH unit in the Korean War:




M*A*S*H was unrealistic in its depiction of an Army medical unit as a hippie commune. Altman wanted to satirize the Vietnam War, but couldn't (because the war was still being fought), so he used the Korean War instead. Commie North Koreans = Commie North Vietnamese. Only to make sure that audiences "got it," he stuck a motley array of 70s characters in what should have been the early 1950s.

Even the theme song, "Suicide Is Painless," doesn't fit the supposed time period.

***
On a side note: "Supernatural" is a television show on the CW that I'm a big fan of. In the 8th season of "Supernatural," the main characters discover a "Men of Letters" bunker, which they appropriate as their home/headquarters.

The Men of Letters were a Knights of Templar like group dedicated to obtaining and preserving knowledge regarding the supernatural. The bunker was locked down in 1958 when a demon infiltrated, and massacred the group.

The Men of Letters used to take turns being stationed in the bunker -- two at a time; and among the possessions remaining inside the bunker, the lead characters discover a small collection of record albums. During the first episode in which they inhabit the bunker, they play two of the records.

At no time in the show do they mention either the titles of the records or the artists who sing on them. They aren't even mentioned in the credits. However, I happen to know what these records are:

"Get Thee Behind Me, Satan," Ella Fitzgerald, Paul Weston & His Orchestra; and "On the Sunny Side of the Street," Frankie Laine, Paul Weston & His Orchestra. Both are album cuts from... wait for it... 1958.

The implication is that the Men of Letters kept the bunker supplied with currently released albums -- much as a doctor's office keeps current issues of magazines in its waiting room.

Think about it -- they could easily used any record from the 1950s for these scenes and very few people would have known. In fact, I doubt very many people made the connection between the release date of the albums (which is never mentioned on the show) and the closing of the bunker. But they took the trouble to do it anyway.

"M*A*S*H" doesn't even make an attempt to approximate the early 1950s.
Zod The Mighty
2019-11-06 02:19:22 UTC
Reply
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Post by Michelangelo Scarlotti
Post by Will Dockery
Good Lord, Pendragon... you don't even like M*A*S*H?
http://youtu.be/LUGc568DMFs
M*A*S*H was unrealistic in its depiction of an Army medical unit as a hippie commune. Altman wanted to satirize the Vietnam War, but couldn't (because the war was still being fought), so he used the Korean War instead. Commie North Koreans = Commie North Vietnamese. Only to make sure that audiences "got it," he stuck a motley array of 70s characters in what should have been the early 1950s.
Even the theme song, "Suicide Is Painless," doesn't fit the supposed time period.
***
On a side note: "Supernatural" is a television show on the CW that I'm a big fan of. In the 8th season of "Supernatural," the main characters discover a "Men of Letters" bunker, which they appropriate as their home/headquarters.
The Men of Letters were a Knights of Templar like group dedicated to obtaining and preserving knowledge regarding the supernatural. The bunker was locked down in 1958 when a demon infiltrated, and massacred the group.
The Men of Letters used to take turns being stationed in the bunker -- two at a time; and among the possessions remaining inside the bunker, the lead characters discover a small collection of record albums. During the first episode in which they inhabit the bunker, they play two of the records.
"Get Thee Behind Me, Satan," Ella Fitzgerald, Paul Weston & His Orchestra; and "On the Sunny Side of the Street," Frankie Laine, Paul Weston & His Orchestra. Both are album cuts from... wait for it... 1958.
The implication is that the Men of Letters kept the bunker supplied with currently released albums -- much as a doctor's office keeps current issues of magazines in its waiting room.
Think about it -- they could easily used any record from the 1950s for these scenes and very few people would have known. In fact, I doubt very many people made the connection between the release date of the albums (which is never mentioned on the show) and the closing of the bunker. But they took the trouble to do it anyway.
"M*A*S*H" doesn't even make an attempt to approximate the early 1950s.
Richard Hooker, the writer of the original M*A*S*H novel, based the story on his own experiences....

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MASH:_A_Novel_About_Three_Army_Doctors

*****************MASH: A Novel About Three Army Doctors is a 1968 novel by Richard Hooker (the pen name for former military surgeon Dr. H. Richard Hornberger and writer W. C. Heinz[1]) which is notable as the inspiration for the feature film MASH (1970) and TV series M*A*S*H. The novel is about a fictional U.S. Mobile Army Surgical Hospital in Korea during the Korean War.

After graduating from Cornell University Medical School, he was drafted into the Korean War and assigned to the 8055 Mobile Army Surgical Hospital (M.A.S.H. or MASH).
M.A.S.H. units, according to one doctor assigned to the unit, "weren't on the front lines, but they were close. They lived and worked in tents. It was hot in the summer and colder than cold in the winter."[3] The operating room consisted of stretchers balanced on carpenter's sawhorses.[4]
Many of the M.A.S.H. doctors were in their 20s, many with little advanced surgical training.[5] During battle campaigns, units could see "as many as 1,000 casualties a day".
"What characterized the fighting in Korea", one of Hornberger's fellow officers recalled, "was that you would have a period of a week or 10 days when nothing much was happening, then there would be a push. When you had a push, there would suddenly be a mass of casualties that would just overwhelm us."[4]
There were, another surgeon recalled, "'long periods when not much of anything happened' in an atmosphere of apparent safety—plenty of time to play ... When things were quiet we would sit around and read. Sometimes the nurses would have a little dance."[5]
A colleague described Hornberger as "a very good surgeon with a tremendous sense of humor." Although Hornberger did label his tent "The Swamp," he was politically conservative.[6]
Hornberger's later assessment of his unit's behavior was: "A few flipped their lids, but most just raised hell in a variety of ways and degrees."[7]
After the war ended, Hornberger worked in a VA hospital before returning to Maine to establish a surgical practice in Waterville.[8] In 1956, he began attempting to put his memories into a book.[9]
In the 1960s, a visit with a former M.A.S.H. colleague and his wife—a nurse at the unit—led to a session of drinking and storytelling.[4] Hornberger later claimed the evening gave him new motivation to finish his manuscript.
A chance event brought Hornberger and Heinz together. "A doctor named J. Maxwell Chamberlain helped me write my novel The Surgeon and, previous to that, a Life cover piece about a lung operation," Heinz told American Heritage magazine.[10] Hornberger, who had studied under Chamberlain, sent Heinz a letter suggesting that they collaborate. After Heinz's wife read the manuscript and enjoyed it, he agreed to contribute: "I cleaned it up, since it was full of those jokes that doctors like to make about the body. Then it took quite a while, maybe a year, back and forth. I eventually tied everything together. As much as it got tied together; there isn't a hell of a story line in MASH, just a succession of operations and techniques and humor. The only thing that holds it together is the characters and the familiarity that the reader comes to have with them."
**************************************************************************
Michael Pendragon
2019-11-06 04:40:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Zod The Mighty
Post by Michelangelo Scarlotti
Post by Will Dockery
Good Lord, Pendragon... you don't even like M*A*S*H?
http://youtu.be/LUGc568DMFs
M*A*S*H was unrealistic in its depiction of an Army medical unit as a hippie commune. Altman wanted to satirize the Vietnam War, but couldn't (because the war was still being fought), so he used the Korean War instead. Commie North Koreans = Commie North Vietnamese. Only to make sure that audiences "got it," he stuck a motley array of 70s characters in what should have been the early 1950s.
Even the theme song, "Suicide Is Painless," doesn't fit the supposed time period.
***
On a side note: "Supernatural" is a television show on the CW that I'm a big fan of. In the 8th season of "Supernatural," the main characters discover a "Men of Letters" bunker, which they appropriate as their home/headquarters.
The Men of Letters were a Knights of Templar like group dedicated to obtaining and preserving knowledge regarding the supernatural. The bunker was locked down in 1958 when a demon infiltrated, and massacred the group.
The Men of Letters used to take turns being stationed in the bunker -- two at a time; and among the possessions remaining inside the bunker, the lead characters discover a small collection of record albums. During the first episode in which they inhabit the bunker, they play two of the records.
"Get Thee Behind Me, Satan," Ella Fitzgerald, Paul Weston & His Orchestra; and "On the Sunny Side of the Street," Frankie Laine, Paul Weston & His Orchestra. Both are album cuts from... wait for it... 1958.
The implication is that the Men of Letters kept the bunker supplied with currently released albums -- much as a doctor's office keeps current issues of magazines in its waiting room.
Think about it -- they could easily used any record from the 1950s for these scenes and very few people would have known. In fact, I doubt very many people made the connection between the release date of the albums (which is never mentioned on the show) and the closing of the bunker. But they took the trouble to do it anyway.
"M*A*S*H" doesn't even make an attempt to approximate the early 1950s.
Richard Hooker, the writer of the original M*A*S*H novel, based the story on his own experiences....
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MASH:_A_Novel_About_Three_Army_Doctors
*****************MASH: A Novel About Three Army Doctors is a 1968 novel by Richard Hooker (the pen name for former military surgeon Dr. H. Richard Hornberger and writer W. C. Heinz[1]) which is notable as the inspiration for the feature film MASH (1970) and TV series M*A*S*H. The novel is about a fictional U.S. Mobile Army Surgical Hospital in Korea during the Korean War.
After graduating from Cornell University Medical School, he was drafted into the Korean War and assigned to the 8055 Mobile Army Surgical Hospital (M.A.S.H. or MASH).
M.A.S.H. units, according to one doctor assigned to the unit, "weren't on the front lines, but they were close. They lived and worked in tents. It was hot in the summer and colder than cold in the winter."[3] The operating room consisted of stretchers balanced on carpenter's sawhorses.[4]
Many of the M.A.S.H. doctors were in their 20s, many with little advanced surgical training.[5] During battle campaigns, units could see "as many as 1,000 casualties a day".
"What characterized the fighting in Korea", one of Hornberger's fellow officers recalled, "was that you would have a period of a week or 10 days when nothing much was happening, then there would be a push. When you had a push, there would suddenly be a mass of casualties that would just overwhelm us."[4]
There were, another surgeon recalled, "'long periods when not much of anything happened' in an atmosphere of apparent safety—plenty of time to play ... When things were quiet we would sit around and read. Sometimes the nurses would have a little dance."[5]
A colleague described Hornberger as "a very good surgeon with a tremendous sense of humor." Although Hornberger did label his tent "The Swamp," he was politically conservative.[6]
Hornberger's later assessment of his unit's behavior was: "A few flipped their lids, but most just raised hell in a variety of ways and degrees."[7]
After the war ended, Hornberger worked in a VA hospital before returning to Maine to establish a surgical practice in Waterville.[8] In 1956, he began attempting to put his memories into a book.[9]
In the 1960s, a visit with a former M.A.S.H. colleague and his wife—a nurse at the unit—led to a session of drinking and storytelling.[4] Hornberger later claimed the evening gave him new motivation to finish his manuscript.
A chance event brought Hornberger and Heinz together. "A doctor named J. Maxwell Chamberlain helped me write my novel The Surgeon and, previous to that, a Life cover piece about a lung operation," Heinz told American Heritage magazine.[10] Hornberger, who had studied under Chamberlain, sent Heinz a letter suggesting that they collaborate. After Heinz's wife read the manuscript and enjoyed it, he agreed to contribute: "I cleaned it up, since it was full of those jokes that doctors like to make about the body. Then it took quite a while, maybe a year, back and forth. I eventually tied everything together. As much as it got tied together; there isn't a hell of a story line in MASH, just a succession of operations and techniques and humor. The only thing that holds it together is the characters and the familiarity that the reader comes to have with them."
**************************************************************************
Do you have anything original to say about "M*A*S*H"?
General Zod
2019-11-07 00:46:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Zod The Mighty
Post by Michelangelo Scarlotti
Post by Will Dockery
Good Lord, Pendragon... you don't even like M*A*S*H?
http://youtu.be/LUGc568DMFs
M*A*S*H was unrealistic in its depiction of an Army medical unit as a hippie commune. Altman wanted to satirize the Vietnam War, but couldn't (because the war was still being fought), so he used the Korean War instead. Commie North Koreans = Commie North Vietnamese. Only to make sure that audiences "got it," he stuck a motley array of 70s characters in what should have been the early 1950s.
Even the theme song, "Suicide Is Painless," doesn't fit the supposed time period.
***
On a side note: "Supernatural" is a television show on the CW that I'm a big fan of. In the 8th season of "Supernatural," the main characters discover a "Men of Letters" bunker, which they appropriate as their home/headquarters.
The Men of Letters were a Knights of Templar like group dedicated to obtaining and preserving knowledge regarding the supernatural. The bunker was locked down in 1958 when a demon infiltrated, and massacred the group.
The Men of Letters used to take turns being stationed in the bunker -- two at a time; and among the possessions remaining inside the bunker, the lead characters discover a small collection of record albums. During the first episode in which they inhabit the bunker, they play two of the records.
"Get Thee Behind Me, Satan," Ella Fitzgerald, Paul Weston & His Orchestra; and "On the Sunny Side of the Street," Frankie Laine, Paul Weston & His Orchestra. Both are album cuts from... wait for it... 1958.
The implication is that the Men of Letters kept the bunker supplied with currently released albums -- much as a doctor's office keeps current issues of magazines in its waiting room.
Think about it -- they could easily used any record from the 1950s for these scenes and very few people would have known. In fact, I doubt very many people made the connection between the release date of the albums (which is never mentioned on the show) and the closing of the bunker. But they took the trouble to do it anyway.
"M*A*S*H" doesn't even make an attempt to approximate the early 1950s.
Richard Hooker, the writer of the original M*A*S*H novel, based the story on his own experiences....
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MASH:_A_Novel_About_Three_Army_Doctors
*****************MASH: A Novel About Three Army Doctors is a 1968 novel by Richard Hooker (the pen name for former military surgeon Dr. H. Richard Hornberger and writer W. C. Heinz[1]) which is notable as the inspiration for the feature film MASH (1970) and TV series M*A*S*H. The novel is about a fictional U.S. Mobile Army Surgical Hospital in Korea during the Korean War.
After graduating from Cornell University Medical School, he was drafted into the Korean War and assigned to the 8055 Mobile Army Surgical Hospital (M.A.S.H. or MASH).
M.A.S.H. units, according to one doctor assigned to the unit, "weren't on the front lines, but they were close. They lived and worked in tents. It was hot in the summer and colder than cold in the winter."[3] The operating room consisted of stretchers balanced on carpenter's sawhorses.[4]
Many of the M.A.S.H. doctors were in their 20s, many with little advanced surgical training.[5] During battle campaigns, units could see "as many as 1,000 casualties a day".
"What characterized the fighting in Korea", one of Hornberger's fellow officers recalled, "was that you would have a period of a week or 10 days when nothing much was happening, then there would be a push. When you had a push, there would suddenly be a mass of casualties that would just overwhelm us."[4]
There were, another surgeon recalled, "'long periods when not much of anything happened' in an atmosphere of apparent safety—plenty of time to play ... When things were quiet we would sit around and read. Sometimes the nurses would have a little dance."[5]
A colleague described Hornberger as "a very good surgeon with a tremendous sense of humor." Although Hornberger did label his tent "The Swamp," he was politically conservative.[6]
Hornberger's later assessment of his unit's behavior was: "A few flipped their lids, but most just raised hell in a variety of ways and degrees."[7]
After the war ended, Hornberger worked in a VA hospital before returning to Maine to establish a surgical practice in Waterville.[8] In 1956, he began attempting to put his memories into a book.[9]
In the 1960s, a visit with a former M.A.S.H. colleague and his wife—a nurse at the unit—led to a session of drinking and storytelling.[4] Hornberger later claimed the evening gave him new motivation to finish his manuscript.
A chance event brought Hornberger and Heinz together. "A doctor named J. Maxwell Chamberlain helped me write my novel The Surgeon and, previous to that, a Life cover piece about a lung operation," Heinz told American Heritage magazine.[10] Hornberger, who had studied under Chamberlain, sent Heinz a letter suggesting that they collaborate. After Heinz's wife read the manuscript and enjoyed it, he agreed to contribute: "I cleaned it up, since it was full of those jokes that doctors like to make about the body. Then it took quite a while, maybe a year, back and forth. I eventually tied everything together. As much as it got tied together; there isn't a hell of a story line in MASH, just a succession of operations and techniques and humor. The only thing that holds it together is the characters and the familiarity that the reader comes to have with them."
**************************************************************************
Do you have anything original to say about "M*A*S*H"?
Quite a lot, yes.................
Z***@none.i2p
2019-11-06 14:24:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Michelangelo Scarlott wrote on Tue, 05 November 2019 04:35
Post by Michelangelo Scarlotti
Post by Will Dockery
Good Lord, Pendragon... you don't even like M*A*S*H?
http://youtu.be/LUGc568DMFs
Okay, that was good, after all.....
Z***@none.i2p
2019-11-05 07:47:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
This is of interest.........

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nashville_(film)

***********************************************************
Numerous characters in Nashville are based on real country music figures: Henry Gibson's Haven Hamilton is a composite of Roy Acuff, Hank Snow, and Porter Wagoner; Ronee Blakley's Barbara Jean is based on Loretta Lynn[16]; the black country singer Tommy Brown (played by Timothy Brown) is based on Charley Pride[16]; and the feuding folk trio is based on Peter, Paul and Mary; within the trio, the married couple of Bill and Mary were inspired by Bill Danoff and Taffy Nivert, who later became Starland Vocal Band.[24] Keith Carradine's character is believed to be inspired by Kris Kristofferson, and Karen Black's Connie White was conceived as a composite of Lynn Anderson, Tammy Wynette, and Dolly Parton********************************************
Will Dockery
2019-11-23 04:09:28 UTC
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Permalink
Keith Carradine is pretty much the prototype for Garth Brooks et al.
Michael Pendragon
2019-11-23 04:21:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Keith Carradine is pretty much the prototype for Garth Brooks et al.
Hmm... someone better straighten out Wikipedia on that one:

"While Brooks' musical style placed him squarely within the boundaries of country music, he was strongly influenced by the 1970s singer-songwriter movement, especially the works of James Taylor, whom he idolized and named his first child after, as well as Dan Fogelberg."
Will Dockery
2019-11-23 05:05:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Keith Carradine is pretty much the prototype for Garth Brooks et al.
"While Brooks' musical style placed him squarely within the boundaries of country music, he was strongly influenced by the 1970s singer-songwriter movement, especially the works of James Taylor, whom he idolized and named his first child after, as well as Dan Fogelberg."
Actually, you accidentally nailed it, as Carradine was one of the the biggest selling, and Academy Award for Best Original Song and the Golden Globe for Best Original Song (Motion Picture) winning, singer-songwriters of 1976:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I%27m_Easy_(Keith_Carradine_song)

""I'm Easy" is an Academy Award-winning song written and performed by Keith Carradine for the 1975 movie Nashville..."

"The song is often mistakenly associated with Jim Croce due to the similarity of Carradine's voice, vocal style and guitar playing, all of which bear strong similarity to Croce..."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?reload=9&v=KatxC0zq06g

I'm Easy · Keith Carradine
Michael Pendragon
2019-11-23 06:51:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Keith Carradine is pretty much the prototype for Garth Brooks et al.
"While Brooks' musical style placed him squarely within the boundaries of country music, he was strongly influenced by the 1970s singer-songwriter movement, especially the works of James Taylor, whom he idolized and named his first child after, as well as Dan Fogelberg."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I%27m_Easy_(Keith_Carradine_song)
""I'm Easy" is an Academy Award-winning song written and performed by Keith Carradine for the 1975 movie Nashville..."
"The song is often mistakenly associated with Jim Croce due to the similarity of Carradine's voice, vocal style and guitar playing, all of which bear strong similarity to Croce..."
https://www.youtube.com/watch?reload=9&v=KatxC0zq06g
I'm Easy · Keith Carradine
Do you understand what the Wikipedia quote you posted is saying?

It's saying that Carradine sounds like Jim Croce. Croce came *before* "Nashville" -- as a matter of fact, he'd been dead a few years by the time "Nashville" came out -- so while Carradine may have been influenced by Croce, Croce wasn't influenced by him.

Now, what does Carradine's imitating Croce have to do with Garth Brooks and the New Country sound?
Z***@none.i2p
2019-11-23 07:09:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Michael Pendragon wrote on Sat, 23 November 2019 06:51
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Keith Carradine is pretty much the prototype for Garth Brooks et al.
"While Brooks' musical style placed him squarely within the boundaries of country music, he was strongly influenced by the 1970s singer-songwriter movement, especially the works of James Taylor, whom he idolized and named his first child after, as well as Dan Fogelberg."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I%27m_Easy_(Keith_Carradine_song)
""I'm Easy" is an Academy Award-winning song written and performed by Keith Carradine for the 1975 movie Nashville..."
"The song is often mistakenly associated with Jim Croce due to the similarity of Carradine's voice, vocal style and guitar playing, all of which bear strong similarity to Croce..."
https://www.youtube.com/watch?reload=9&v=KatxC0zq06g
I'm Easy · Keith Carradine
Do you understand what the Wikipedia quote you posted is saying?
It's saying that Carradine sounds like Jim Croce. Croce came *before* "Nashville" -- as a matter of fact, he'd been dead a few years by the time "Nashville" came out -- so while Carradine may have been influenced by Croce, Croce wasn't influenced by him.
Now, what does Carradine's imitating Croce have to do with Garth Brooks and the New Country sound?
If you understood either Jim Croce or Keith Carridine you would know thee was no imitation at all......

Both artists are quite original......
Michael Pendragon
2019-11-23 07:33:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Z***@none.i2p
Michael Pendragon wrote on Sat, 23 November 2019 06:51
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Keith Carradine is pretty much the prototype for Garth Brooks et al.
"While Brooks' musical style placed him squarely within the boundaries of country music, he was strongly influenced by the 1970s singer-songwriter movement, especially the works of James Taylor, whom he idolized and named his first child after, as well as Dan Fogelberg."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I%27m_Easy_(Keith_Carradine_song)
""I'm Easy" is an Academy Award-winning song written and performed by Keith Carradine for the 1975 movie Nashville..."
"The song is often mistakenly associated with Jim Croce due to the similarity of Carradine's voice, vocal style and guitar playing, all of which bear strong similarity to Croce..."
https://www.youtube.com/watch?reload=9&v=KatxC0zq06g
I'm Easy · Keith Carradine
Do you understand what the Wikipedia quote you posted is saying?
It's saying that Carradine sounds like Jim Croce. Croce came *before* "Nashville" -- as a matter of fact, he'd been dead a few years by the time "Nashville" came out -- so while Carradine may have been influenced by Croce, Croce wasn't influenced by him.
Now, what does Carradine's imitating Croce have to do with Garth Brooks and the New Country sound?
If you understood either Jim Croce or Keith Carridine you would know thee was no imitation at all......
Both artists are quite original......
I know how to spell "Carradine" correctly, which is more than you do, Stink.
Z***@none.i2p
2019-11-24 09:38:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Michael Pendragon wrote on Sat, 23 November 2019 07:33
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Z***@none.i2p
Michael Pendragon wrote on Sat, 23 November 2019 06:51
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Keith Carradine is pretty much the prototype for Garth Brooks et al.
"While Brooks' musical style placed him squarely within the boundaries of country music, he was strongly influenced by the 1970s singer-songwriter movement, especially the works of James Taylor, whom he idolized and named his first child after, as well as Dan Fogelberg."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I%27m_Easy_(Keith_Carradine_song)
""I'm Easy" is an Academy Award-winning song written and performed by Keith Carradine for the 1975 movie Nashville..."
"The song is often mistakenly associated with Jim Croce due to the similarity of Carradine's voice, vocal style and guitar playing, all of which bear strong similarity to Croce..."
https://www.youtube.com/watch?reload=9&v=KatxC0zq06g
I'm Easy · Keith Carradine
Do you understand what the Wikipedia quote you posted is saying?
It's saying that Carradine sounds like Jim Croce. Croce came *before* "Nashville" -- as a matter of fact, he'd been dead a few years by the time "Nashville" came out -- so while Carradine may have been influenced by Croce, Croce wasn't influenced by him.
Now, what does Carradine's imitating Croce have to do with Garth Brooks and the New Country sound?
If you understood either Jim Croce or Keith Carridine you would know thee was no imitation at all......
Both artists are quite original......
I know how to spell "Carradine" correctly
But after that you seem to know zilch, Pendragon....
Michael Pendragon
2019-11-24 17:50:55 UTC
Reply
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Post by Z***@none.i2p
Michael Pendragon wrote on Sat, 23 November 2019 07:33
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Z***@none.i2p
Michael Pendragon wrote on Sat, 23 November 2019 06:51
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Keith Carradine is pretty much the prototype for Garth Brooks et al.
"While Brooks' musical style placed him squarely within the boundaries of country music, he was strongly influenced by the 1970s singer-songwriter movement, especially the works of James Taylor, whom he idolized and named his first child after, as well as Dan Fogelberg."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I%27m_Easy_(Keith_Carradine_song)
""I'm Easy" is an Academy Award-winning song written and performed by Keith Carradine for the 1975 movie Nashville..."
"The song is often mistakenly associated with Jim Croce due to the similarity of Carradine's voice, vocal style and guitar playing, all of which bear strong similarity to Croce..."
https://www.youtube.com/watch?reload=9&v=KatxC0zq06g
I'm Easy · Keith Carradine
Do you understand what the Wikipedia quote you posted is saying?
It's saying that Carradine sounds like Jim Croce. Croce came *before* "Nashville" -- as a matter of fact, he'd been dead a few years by the time "Nashville" came out -- so while Carradine may have been influenced by Croce, Croce wasn't influenced by him.
Now, what does Carradine's imitating Croce have to do with Garth Brooks and the New Country sound?
If you understood either Jim Croce or Keith Carridine you would know thee was no imitation at all......
Both artists are quite original......
I know how to spell "Carradine" correctly
But after that you seem to know zilch, Pendragon....
In which case, it follows that you know less than zilch.
Will Dockery
2019-11-24 17:59:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Z***@none.i2p
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Z***@none.i2p
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Keith Carradine is pretty much the prototype for Garth Brooks et al.
"While Brooks' musical style placed him squarely within the boundaries of country music, he was strongly influenced by the 1970s singer-songwriter movement, especially the works of James Taylor, whom he idolized and named his first child after, as well as Dan Fogelberg."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I%27m_Easy_(Keith_Carradine_song)
""I'm Easy" is an Academy Award-winning song written and performed by Keith Carradine for the 1975 movie Nashville..."
"The song is often mistakenly associated with Jim Croce due to the similarity of Carradine's voice, vocal style and guitar playing, all of which bear strong similarity to Croce..."
https://www.youtube.com/watch?reload=9&v=KatxC0zq06g
I'm Easy · Keith Carradine
Do you understand what the Wikipedia quote you posted is saying?
It's saying that Carradine sounds like Jim Croce. Croce came *before* "Nashville" -- as a matter of fact, he'd been dead a few years by the time "Nashville" came out -- so while Carradine may have been influenced by Croce, Croce wasn't influenced by him.
Now, what does Carradine's imitating Croce have to do with Garth Brooks and the New Country sound?
If you understood either Jim Croce or Keith Carridine you would know thee was no imitation at all......
Both artists are quite original......
I know how to spell "Carradine" correctly
But after that you seem to know zilch, Pendragon....
In which case, it follows that you know less than zilch.
Do, I know more about the Nashville film and Robert Altman than either of you.

;)
Michael Pendragon
2019-11-24 18:07:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Z***@none.i2p
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Z***@none.i2p
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Keith Carradine is pretty much the prototype for Garth Brooks et al.
"While Brooks' musical style placed him squarely within the boundaries of country music, he was strongly influenced by the 1970s singer-songwriter movement, especially the works of James Taylor, whom he idolized and named his first child after, as well as Dan Fogelberg."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I%27m_Easy_(Keith_Carradine_song)
""I'm Easy" is an Academy Award-winning song written and performed by Keith Carradine for the 1975 movie Nashville..."
"The song is often mistakenly associated with Jim Croce due to the similarity of Carradine's voice, vocal style and guitar playing, all of which bear strong similarity to Croce..."
https://www.youtube.com/watch?reload=9&v=KatxC0zq06g
I'm Easy · Keith Carradine
Do you understand what the Wikipedia quote you posted is saying?
It's saying that Carradine sounds like Jim Croce. Croce came *before* "Nashville" -- as a matter of fact, he'd been dead a few years by the time "Nashville" came out -- so while Carradine may have been influenced by Croce, Croce wasn't influenced by him.
Now, what does Carradine's imitating Croce have to do with Garth Brooks and the New Country sound?
If you understood either Jim Croce or Keith Carridine you would know thee was no imitation at all......
Both artists are quite original......
I know how to spell "Carradine" correctly
But after that you seem to know zilch, Pendragon....
In which case, it follows that you know less than zilch.
Do, I know more about the Nashville film and Robert Altman than either of you.
Prove it.

You've already admitted that it's mostly the music that makes the film great; yet you claim that you still prefer seeing the three hour film as opposed to a 1-hour "concert" film featuring only the musical performances.

So far, you've been unable to explain why.

If Altman had made a three hour movie featuring only musical performances by these same actors, would it have been better than his film where the mixture is 1 hour of music to 2 hours of soap?
Will Dockery
2019-11-24 18:13:43 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Michael Pendragon
So, I know more about the Nashville film and Robert Altman than either of you.
Prove it
Your comments on the film prove it for me.

;)
Michael Pendragon
2019-11-24 18:16:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
So, I know more about the Nashville film and Robert Altman than either of you.
Prove it
Your comments on the film prove it for me.
That's a cop-out answer, which proves nothing.

If you know *anything* about the movie, this is the place to prove.

NOTE: Copy/pastes from Wikipedia and/or Rotten Tomatoes don't show that you know anything... other than how to copy/paste.
Will Dockery
2019-11-24 18:18:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Michael Pendragon
If you know *anything* about the movie
What do you want to know about it, I probably have the answer.

;)
Michael Pendragon
2019-11-24 23:01:22 UTC
Reply
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Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
If you know *anything* about the movie
What do you want to know about it, I probably have the answer.
As previously asked:

You've already admitted that it's mostly the music that makes the film great; yet you claim that you still prefer seeing the three hour film as opposed to a 1-hour "concert" film featuring only the musical performances.

If Altman had made a three hour movie featuring only musical performances by these same actors, would it have been better than his film where the mixture is 1 hour of music to 2 hours of soap?
Z***@none.i2p
2019-11-23 07:06:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Will Dockery wrote on Sat, 23 November 2019 04:09
Post by Will Dockery
Keith Carradine is pretty much the prototype for Garth Brooks et al.
This bit from some fellow is a great example of the way those of us who love the alternate universe created by "Nashville" get right into it, music, storytelling, the whole nine yards.............

*******************So, Nashville the movie. When I was a young person in the 70s, and
movies could be seen only in movie theaters, the arrival of Nashville
in one of the fine rep houses of San Francisco was a cause for mild
celebration. A friend would call and say, "The movie is playing!" THE
movie meant Nashville. We loved it. It WAS country to us. We loved the
kitsch and the pathos. What did we know? I still think some of the
songs are amazing, the way they show the range and the variety and the
competing strains of the music. And the actors do a great job of
singing, I think. Karen Black! Keith Carradine! Ronnee Blakely! And of
course, Henry Gibson as Haven Hamilton*****************************************

*****************************Altman himself was doing
this post-modern embrace of country music and the version of America he
allows it to present in the film*************************
Michael Pendragon
2019-11-23 07:32:37 UTC
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Post by Z***@none.i2p
Will Dockery wrote on Sat, 23 November 2019 04:09
Post by Will Dockery
Keith Carradine is pretty much the prototype for Garth Brooks et al.
This bit from some fellow is a great example of the way those of us who love the alternate universe created by "Nashville" get right into it, music, storytelling, the whole nine yards.............
*******************So, Nashville the movie. When I was a young person in the 70s, and
movies could be seen only in movie theaters, the arrival of Nashville
in one of the fine rep houses of San Francisco was a cause for mild
celebration. A friend would call and say, "The movie is playing!" THE
movie meant Nashville. We loved it. It WAS country to us. We loved the
kitsch and the pathos. What did we know? I still think some of the
songs are amazing, the way they show the range and the variety and the
competing strains of the music. And the actors do a great job of
singing, I think. Karen Black! Keith Carradine! Ronnee Blakely! And of
course, Henry Gibson as Haven Hamilton*****************************************
*****************************Altman himself was doing
this post-modern embrace of country music and the version of America he
allows it to present in the film*************************
Do you have *any* original thoughts or opinions, Stink?
Will Dockery
2019-11-23 07:39:20 UTC
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Post by Z***@none.i2p
Will Dockery wrote on Sat, 23 November 2019 04:09
Post by Will Dockery
Keith Carradine is pretty much the prototype for Garth Brooks et al.
This bit from some fellow is a great example of the way those of us who love the alternate universe created by "Nashville" get right into it, music, storytelling, the whole nine yards.............
*******************So, Nashville the movie. When I was a young person in the 70s, and
movies could be seen only in movie theaters, the arrival of Nashville
in one of the fine rep houses of San Francisco was a cause for mild
celebration. A friend would call and say, "The movie is playing!" THE
movie meant Nashville. We loved it. It WAS country to us. We loved the
kitsch and the pathos. What did we know? I still think some of the
songs are amazing, the way they show the range and the variety and the
competing strains of the music. And the actors do a great job of
singing, I think. Karen Black! Keith Carradine! Ronnee Blakely! And of
course, Henry Gibson as Haven Hamilton*****************************************
*****************************Altman himself was doing
this post-modern embrace of country music and the version of America he
allows it to present in the film*************************
Good find, Zod.
Z***@none.i2p
2019-11-24 23:09:01 UTC
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Here is the mastermind of NASHVILLE right here.....



A Conversation with Robert Altman: the director discusses his film Nashville (USA 1975).
Michael Pendragon
2019-11-24 23:26:21 UTC
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Post by Z***@none.i2p
Here is the mastermind of NASHVILLE right here.....
http://youtu.be/LrZ0Bqrvv3o
A Conversation with Robert Altman: the director discusses his film Nashville (USA 1975).
I asked if you had any original thoughts on the movie, Stink.

Your "answer" confirms my suspicions.
Z***@none.i2p
2019-11-25 00:39:09 UTC
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Michael Pendragon wrote on Sun, 24 November 2019 23:26
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Z***@none.i2p
Here is the mastermind of NASHVILLE right here.....
http://youtu.be/LrZ0Bqrvv3o
A Conversation with Robert Altman: the director discusses his film Nashville (USA 1975).
I asked
So, you asked....

The opinions and thoughts of the fucken creator of the ovie is much more interesting and informative than anything I, and certainly you, have to say......

Since yu don't know Jack Shit about the NASHVILLE movie.......
Michael Pendragon
2019-11-25 04:25:32 UTC
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Post by Z***@none.i2p
Michael Pendragon wrote on Sun, 24 November 2019 23:26
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Z***@none.i2p
Here is the mastermind of NASHVILLE right here.....
http://youtu.be/LrZ0Bqrvv3o
A Conversation with Robert Altman: the director discusses his film Nashville (USA 1975).
I asked
So, you asked....
The opinions and thoughts of the fucken creator of the ovie is much more interesting and informative than anything I, and certainly you, have to say......
Since yu don't know Jack Shit about the NASHVILLE movie.......
If I were interested in Altman's opinions, I would have googled him myself.

I asked you for your original thoughts. If you haven't any original thoughts, just say so and we can move on.
Will Dockery
2019-11-24 23:43:09 UTC
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I've seen Zod offer several original thoughts on the film, you just choose not to accept them.

;)
Z***@none.i2p
2019-11-25 02:49:30 UTC
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Will Dockery wrote on Sun, 24 November 2019 23:43
Post by Will Dockery
I've seen Zod offer several original thoughts on the film, you just choose not to accept them.
;)
I can name and discuss just about every scene and song in the movie....

Since Pendragon never even seems to have aid attention, this is not needed......
Z***@none.i2p
2019-11-25 00:39:54 UTC
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Typo correction, movie not ovie....! !!
Will Dockery
2019-11-25 04:35:13 UTC
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Be honest, Pendragon.

You have no interest in Altman, and even less in Zod.

You're just trolling.

;)
General Zod
2019-11-25 04:54:00 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Be honest, Pendragon.
You have no interest in Altman, and even less in Zod.
You're just trolling.
;)
Exactly.....

This all started because he HATES the movie....
Michael Pendragon
2019-11-25 13:13:26 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Be honest, Pendragon.
You have no interest in Altman,
True.
and even less in Zod.
Also true. Why should anyone be interested in Stink?
Post by Will Dockery
You're just trolling.
Wrong.

I'm attempting to engage the two surviving Splooges in something resembling a discussion.

Let's continue.

If the musical perfs are what make the movie great, it follows that had the film been entirely composed of such performances, it should have been at least as great -- if not moreso.

Agree or disagree? And if the latter, why?
Will Dockery
2019-11-25 16:31:23 UTC
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Post by Michael Pendragon
If the musical perfs are what make the movie great, it follows that had the film been entirely composed of such performances, it should have been at least as great -- if not moreso.
Agree or disagree? And if the latter, why?
For me, no because unlike you (which you admit) I have an interest in the was Robert Altman tells his stories.

M*A*S*H, McCabe & Mrs. Miller, even the oddball Popeye are among my favrites, as well as Nashville.
Michael Pendragon
2019-11-25 20:58:58 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
If the musical perfs are what make the movie great, it follows that had the film been entirely composed of such performances, it should have been at least as great -- if not moreso.
Agree or disagree? And if the latter, why?
For me, no because unlike you (which you admit) I have an interest in the was Robert Altman tells his stories.
M*A*S*H, McCabe & Mrs. Miller, even the oddball Popeye are among my favrites, as well as Nashville.
I'm not saying that don't have an interest in Altman's handling of the stories. I'm saying that if, for you, the songs were what made the movie great (your words), it would follow that the individual songs/performances were better (in your opinion) than the film as a whole.

If that is not what you'd intended to say, please emend your statement accordingly.
Will Dockery
2019-11-25 21:02:35 UTC
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Post by Michael Pendragon
I'm not saying that don't have an interest in Altman's handling of the stories. I'm saying that if, for you, the songs were what made the movie great (your words)
I think I said more than that, but yes, the music s an important part of the film, of course, but the film as Altman presented it is damn good.

;)

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