Discussion:
September Equinox / Will Dockery
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Will Dockery
2019-10-30 14:12:29 UTC
Permalink
Zip-a-dee-doo-dah, zip-a-dee-ay.
My, oh, my, what a wonderful day
Plenty of sunshine headin' my way.
Zip-a-dee-doo-dah, zip-a-dee-ay.

*****************
Human Rights Network
Song of the South is the movie that Disney would like to forget. Everyone knows the tune Zip-A-Dee-Doo-Dah, but few realize that this "song" is central to this embarrassingly racist celebration of the slave society of the American South prior to the Civil War.
Along with Uncle Remus, the film features such racially charged elements as the story of Br'er Rabbit and the "Tar Baby". Some have defended the latter as a story told by American slaves with its origins in African folk culture. But there is no denying that both the term and the symbolism of the story had intensely racist meaning in the context of the American South.
This original movie review was created by students at academic institutions affiliated with the Human Rights Network (HRN). All HRN content has been created for educational purposes within applicable fair use guidelines in order to spread respect for the universal human rights principles enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (United Nations 1948)******************
Yes, I'm sure Corey knows about that
Michael Pendragon
2019-10-30 15:51:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Zip-a-dee-doo-dah, zip-a-dee-ay.
My, oh, my, what a wonderful day
Plenty of sunshine headin' my way.
Zip-a-dee-doo-dah, zip-a-dee-ay.
http://youtu.be/vzf277YVMyg
*****************
Human Rights Network
Song of the South is the movie that Disney would like to forget. Everyone knows the tune Zip-A-Dee-Doo-Dah, but few realize that this "song" is central to this embarrassingly racist celebration of the slave society of the American South prior to the Civil War.
Along with Uncle Remus, the film features such racially charged elements as the story of Br'er Rabbit and the "Tar Baby". Some have defended the latter as a story told by American slaves with its origins in African folk culture. But there is no denying that both the term and the symbolism of the story had intensely racist meaning in the context of the American South.
This original movie review was created by students at academic institutions affiliated with the Human Rights Network (HRN). All HRN content has been created for educational purposes within applicable fair use guidelines in order to spread respect for the universal human rights principles enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (United Nations 1948)******************
Yes, I'm sure Corey knows about that
I remember reading "Tar Baby" in class from my first grade reader. A rabbit outsmarts a fox.

Do you see any undeniable racist symbolism in the story, Willy?
Will Dockery
2019-10-30 16:05:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michael Pendragon
http://youtu.be/vzf277YVMyg
*****************
Human Rights Network
Song of the South is the movie that Disney would like to forget. Everyone knows the tune Zip-A-Dee-Doo-Dah, but few realize that this "song" is central to this embarrassingly racist celebration of the slave society of the American South prior to the Civil War.
Along with Uncle Remus, the film features such racially charged elements as the story of Br'er Rabbit and the "Tar Baby". Some have defended the latter as a story told by American slaves with its origins in African folk culture. But there is no denying that both the term and the symbolism of the story had intensely racist meaning in the context of the American South.
This original movie review was created by students at academic institutions affiliated with the Human Rights Network (HRN). All HRN content has been created for educational purposes within applicable fair use guidelines in order to spread respect for the universal human rights principles enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (United Nations 1948)******************
Do you see any undeniable racist symbolism in the story
It isn't what you or I think that's the question, it is what folks like the Human Rights Network have decided it politically correct and what is not.
Z***@none.i2p
2019-10-30 16:17:10 UTC
Permalink
Will Dockery wrote on Wed, 30 October 2019 16:05
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
http://youtu.be/vzf277YVMyg
*****************
Human Rights Network
Song of the South is the movie that Disney would like to forget. Everyone knows the tune Zip-A-Dee-Doo-Dah, but few realize that this "song" is central to this embarrassingly racist celebration of the slave society of the American South prior to the Civil War.
Along with Uncle Remus, the film features such racially charged elements as the story of Br'er Rabbit and the "Tar Baby". Some have defended the latter as a story told by American slaves with its origins in African folk culture. But there is no denying that both the term and the symbolism of the story had intensely racist meaning in the context of the American South.
This original movie review was created by students at academic institutions affiliated with the Human Rights Network (HRN). All HRN content has been created for educational purposes within applicable fair use guidelines in order to spread respect for the universal human rights principles enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (United Nations 1948)******************
Do you see any undeniable racist symbolism in the story
It isn't what you or I think that's the question, it is what folks like the Human Rights Network have decided it politically correct and what is not.
Exactly...............
Michael Pendragon
2019-10-30 16:50:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
http://youtu.be/vzf277YVMyg
*****************
Human Rights Network
Song of the South is the movie that Disney would like to forget. Everyone knows the tune Zip-A-Dee-Doo-Dah, but few realize that this "song" is central to this embarrassingly racist celebration of the slave society of the American South prior to the Civil War.
Along with Uncle Remus, the film features such racially charged elements as the story of Br'er Rabbit and the "Tar Baby". Some have defended the latter as a story told by American slaves with its origins in African folk culture. But there is no denying that both the term and the symbolism of the story had intensely racist meaning in the context of the American South.
This original movie review was created by students at academic institutions affiliated with the Human Rights Network (HRN). All HRN content has been created for educational purposes within applicable fair use guidelines in order to spread respect for the universal human rights principles enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (United Nations 1948)******************
Do you see any undeniable racist symbolism in the story
It isn't what you or I think that's the question, it is what folks like the Human Rights Network have decided it politically correct and what is not.
Why should I care what HRN thinks?

I asked you what you think, Will.

You do have some thoughts on the matter... don't you?
Z***@none.i2p
2019-10-30 17:02:19 UTC
Permalink
Michael Pendragon wrote on Wed, 30 October 2019 16:50
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Michael Pendragon
http://youtu.be/vzf277YVMyg
*****************
Human Rights Network
Song of the South is the movie that Disney would like to forget. Everyone knows the tune Zip-A-Dee-Doo-Dah, but few realize that this "song" is central to this embarrassingly racist celebration of the slave society of the American South prior to the Civil War.
Along with Uncle Remus, the film features such racially charged elements as the story of Br'er Rabbit and the "Tar Baby". Some have defended the latter as a story told by American slaves with its origins in African folk culture. But there is no denying that both the term and the symbolism of the story had intensely racist meaning in the context of the American South.
This original movie review was created by students at academic institutions affiliated with the Human Rights Network (HRN). All HRN content has been created for educational purposes within applicable fair use guidelines in order to spread respect for the universal human rights principles enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (United Nations 1948)******************
Do you see any undeniable racist symbolism in the story
It isn't what you or I think that's the question, it is what folks like the Human Rights Network have decided it politically correct and what is not..
Why should I care what HRN thinks
No reason, racist..........
Michael Pendragon
2019-10-30 17:38:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Z***@none.i2p
Michael Pendragon wrote on Wed, 30 October 2019 16:50
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Michael Pendragon
http://youtu.be/vzf277YVMyg
*****************
Human Rights Network
Song of the South is the movie that Disney would like to forget. Everyone knows the tune Zip-A-Dee-Doo-Dah, but few realize that this "song" is central to this embarrassingly racist celebration of the slave society of the American South prior to the Civil War.
Along with Uncle Remus, the film features such racially charged elements as the story of Br'er Rabbit and the "Tar Baby". Some have defended the latter as a story told by American slaves with its origins in African folk culture. But there is no denying that both the term and the symbolism of the story had intensely racist meaning in the context of the American South.
This original movie review was created by students at academic institutions affiliated with the Human Rights Network (HRN). All HRN content has been created for educational purposes within applicable fair use guidelines in order to spread respect for the universal human rights principles enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (United Nations 1948)******************
Do you see any undeniable racist symbolism in the story
It isn't what you or I think that's the question, it is what folks like the Human Rights Network have decided it politically correct and what is not..
Why should I care what HRN thinks
No reason, racist..........
Okay, Stink. How is a folk tale about a rabbit outsmarting a fox symbolically racist?

You can begin your argument by explaining which of the two characters represent which race.
Z***@none.i2p
2019-10-31 18:00:34 UTC
Permalink
Michael Pendragon wrote on Wed, 30 October 2019 17:38
Post by Michael Pendragon
How is a folk tale about a rabbit outsmarting a fox
Of great interest is that the stories actually coe from Native American Cherokee mythology.......

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Br%27er_Rabbit#Cherokee_parallels

*****************the Br'er Rabbit cycle had been recorded earlier among the Cherokees: The "tar baby" story was printed in an 1845 edition of the Cherokee Advocate, the same year Joel Chandler Harris was born.[12]

Rabbit and Hare myths abound among Algonquin Indians in Eastern North America, particularly under the name Nanabozho. The Great Hare is generally worshipped among tribes in eastern Canada***************************
Z***@none.i2p
2019-10-30 18:02:05 UTC
Permalink
I'm not the politically correct one here, but in modern times many things of the past are now offensive to blacks and other minority races.....
Coco DeSockmonkey
2019-10-30 18:23:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Z***@none.i2p
I'm not the politically correct one here, but in modern times many things of the past are now offensive to blacks and other minority races.....
Is Br'er Rabbit meant to represent African Americans and Br'er Fox to represent Caucasians? Or vice-versa?
Z***@none.i2p
2019-10-30 18:28:14 UTC
Permalink
Good question, ask a politically correct liberal, they might have the answer for you...........
Will Dockery
2019-10-31 14:39:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Z***@none.i2p
Good question, ask a politically correct liberal, they might have the answer for you...........
White people have decided the niggers are offended so it must be true.
Zod The Mighty
2019-10-31 00:43:03 UTC
Permalink
Will Dockery wrote on Wed, 25 September 2019 21:31
September Equinox
Summer held on this year,
put up some kind of a fight.
But Fall will not be denied,
it creeps in
under cover of the night.
It feels great late
Feeling all right.
-Will Dockery
Good poem....
Thanks for the nod, General Zod.
;)
N.P.
Z***@none.i2p
2019-10-31 04:13:20 UTC
Permalink
September Equinox
Summer held on this year,
put up some kind of a fight.
But Fall will not be denied,
it creeps in
under cover of the night.
It feels great late
Feeling all right.
-Will Dockery
[color=blue
[/color]
Nice!!!
Seconded...!!
Will Dockery
2019-10-31 15:16:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Z***@none.i2p
September Equinox
Summer held on this year,
put up some kind of a fight.
But Fall will not be denied,
it creeps in
under cover of the night.
It feels great late
Feeling all right.
-Will Dockery
[color=blue
[/color]
Nice!!!
Seconded...!!
Thanks for reading and commenting.

;)
Will Dockery
2019-10-31 15:26:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Z***@none.i2p
September Equinox
Summer held on this year,
put up some kind of a fight.
But Fall will not be denied,
it creeps in
under cover of the night.
It feels great late
Feeling all right.
-Will Dockery
[color=blue
[/color]
Nice!!!
Seconded...!!
Thanks for reading and commenting, my friends.

:)
General Zod
2019-10-31 23:45:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
ozarknotailsmanx wrote on Wed, 25 September 2019 23:12
September Equinox
Summer held on this year,
put up some kind of a fight.
But Fall will not be denied,
it creeps in
under cover of the night.
It feels great late
Feeling all right.
-Will Dockery
September Equinox
Summer held on this year,
put up some kind of a fight.
But Fall will not be denied,
it creeps in
under cover of the night.
It feels great late
Feeling all right.
-Will Dockery
September Equinox
Summer held on this year,
put up some kind of a fight.
But Fall will not be denied,
it creeps in
under cover of the night.
It feels great late
Feeling all right.
-Will Dockery
Looks like another Google Groups glitch......
All of Will's poetry reads that way.
Thanks for reading and commenting.
;)
Ha ha ha......
Will Dockery
2019-11-01 00:15:17 UTC
Permalink
Will Dockery wrote on Wed, 25 September 2019 21:31
September Equinox
Summer held on this year,
put up some kind of a fight.
But Fall will not be denied,
it creeps in
under cover of the night.
It feels great late
Feeling all right.
-Will Dockery
Good poem....
Thanks for the nod, General Zod.

;)
Will Dockery
2019-11-01 12:10:58 UTC
Permalink
Will Dockery wrote on Wed, 25 September 2019 21:31
September Equinox
Summer held on this year,
put up some kind of a fight.
But Fall will not be denied,
it creeps in
under cover of the night.
It feels great late
Feeling all right.
-Will Dockery
Good poem....
Thanks for reading and commenting, General Zod.

:)
Z***@none.i2p
2019-11-01 12:30:34 UTC
Permalink
Will Dockery wrote on Fri, 01 November 2019 12:10
Post by Will Dockery
Will Dockery wrote on Wed, 25 September 2019 21:31
September Equinox
Summer held on this year,
put up some kind of a fight.
But Fall will not be denied,
it creeps in
under cover of the night.
It feels great late
Feeling all right.
-Will Dockery
Good poem....
Thanks for reading and commenting, General Zod.
:)
Right on, Doc.....

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