Discussion:
An example of metaphysical poetry: Icicle Drops / Arthur John Lockhart
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George Dance
2016-02-18 17:31:26 UTC
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Icicle Drops

I

Fast from yon icicle's inverted spire,
Yon shining minims, glittering in the sun,
Fall brightly down, sheen drops of fluent fire,
Momently hanging, -- sinking, one by one, --
Sliding clear beads as down a silver wire;
So archer-stars shoot thro' abysses dun;
So blood drips down from the knive's fierce desire;
So fall our moments; so our tears do run.

With drop on drop, with everlasting flow,
With changing atom, and revolving sphere,
Our never-resting lives must downward go; --
Still hung in momentary brightness here,
Then sinking to that breast toward which incline
The drops that glow, and eke the beams that shine.


II

The sun, at length, with a more fervent fire,
Hath gained a subtle mastery of the dawn;
And, still more swiftly, from the less'ning spire
The hastening gems descend, till all are gone.
But, lo! they come! The vanish'd ones surprise
In golden mist, my wistful, musing sight;
Soul o' th' earth, its exhalations rise,
And soon the drops return to air and light.

There shall they hang 'mid purple glooms aloof,
With clouds noon-white, or tinct with crimson eve:
Or shine supreme in Iris' circling woof.
Wherein his married hues the sun doth weave.
And so this falling life shall not remain
Sunk in the earth; 'twill rise to Heaven again.

- Arthur John Lockhart, 1895

http://gdancesbetty.blogspot.ca/2011/03/icicle-drops-arthur-john-lockhart.html
Will Dockery
2016-02-19 19:37:36 UTC
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Post by George Dance
Icicle Drops
I
Fast from yon icicle's inverted spire,
Yon shining minims, glittering in the sun,
Fall brightly down, sheen drops of fluent fire,
Momently hanging, -- sinking, one by one, --
Sliding clear beads as down a silver wire;
So archer-stars shoot thro' abysses dun;
So blood drips down from the knive's fierce desire;
So fall our moments; so our tears do run.
With drop on drop, with everlasting flow,
With changing atom, and revolving sphere,
Our never-resting lives must downward go; --
Still hung in momentary brightness here,
Then sinking to that breast toward which incline
The drops that glow, and eke the beams that shine.
II
The sun, at length, with a more fervent fire,
Hath gained a subtle mastery of the dawn;
And, still more swiftly, from the less'ning spire
The hastening gems descend, till all are gone.
But, lo! they come! The vanish'd ones surprise
In golden mist, my wistful, musing sight;
Soul o' th' earth, its exhalations rise,
And soon the drops return to air and light.
There shall they hang 'mid purple glooms aloof,
Or shine supreme in Iris' circling woof.
Wherein his married hues the sun doth weave.
And so this falling life shall not remain
Sunk in the earth; 'twill rise to Heaven again.
- Arthur John Lockhart, 1895
http://gdancesbetty.blogspot.ca/2011/03/icicle-drops-arthur-john-lockhart.html
Thanks, George... I note the date on this, as I pass it on to the interested readers in the other Forum.

:)
Will Dockery
2016-03-13 16:27:52 UTC
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Penny's 14 Days of Christmas - a poem a day on The Penny Blog.
In Memoriam A.H.H. LXXVIII by Alfred Tennyson
Again at Christmas did we weave
The holly round the Christmas hearth;
The silent snow possess'd the earth,
[...]
http://gdancesbetty.blogspot.com/2011/12/again-at-christmas-did-we-weave-alfred.html
I missed this Metaphysical jaunt due to an advanced X-mas overdose.

http://www.tor.com/2012/12/03/the-great-alan-moore-reread-the-league-of-extraordinary-gentlemen-part-two/

"...The threat of a Martian invasion helps to provide a clear external conflict throughout... weaves a substantial Island of Dr. Moreau subplot into the narrative tapestry and includes Lord Tennyson's "Nature, red in tooth and claw" line as the metaphorical underpinning."

"...If you recall your Tennyson, you'll remember that in his great poem "In Memoriam A.H.H."--written as an elegy to the poet Arthur Henry Hallam--Tennyson explores the struggle of humanity in a world in which the beneficence of God and the violence of nature seem to coexist. Tennyson was supposedly influenced by the new ideas about evolution that were beginning to gain popularity in the Victorian age, even decades before Charles Darwin would publish The Origin of the Species. That collision between science and faith, and a parallel dichotomy between savagery and decorum... the brutal Martians attack and the heroes give in to many of their more primal, lusty instincts, who could be a more appropriate foil than H. G. Wells's Dr. Moreau, a scientist who sews together humans and animals into ungodly beasts?"

Fascinating questions, not as many answers.
General Zod
2019-04-16 04:08:36 UTC
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Post by George Dance
Icicle Drops
I
Fast from yon icicle's inverted spire,
Yon shining minims, glittering in the sun,
Fall brightly down, sheen drops of fluent fire,
Momently hanging, -- sinking, one by one, --
Sliding clear beads as down a silver wire;
So archer-stars shoot thro' abysses dun;
So blood drips down from the knive's fierce desire;
So fall our moments; so our tears do run.
With drop on drop, with everlasting flow,
With changing atom, and revolving sphere,
Our never-resting lives must downward go; --
Still hung in momentary brightness here,
Then sinking to that breast toward which incline
The drops that glow, and eke the beams that shine.
II
The sun, at length, with a more fervent fire,
Hath gained a subtle mastery of the dawn;
And, still more swiftly, from the less'ning spire
The hastening gems descend, till all are gone.
But, lo! they come! The vanish'd ones surprise
In golden mist, my wistful, musing sight;
Soul o' th' earth, its exhalations rise,
And soon the drops return to air and light.
There shall they hang 'mid purple glooms aloof,
Or shine supreme in Iris' circling woof.
Wherein his married hues the sun doth weave.
And so this falling life shall not remain
Sunk in the earth; 'twill rise to Heaven again.
- Arthur John Lockhart, 1895
http://gdancesbetty.blogspot.ca/2011/03/icicle-drops-arthur-john-lockhart.html
Helpful.....
Will Dockery
2019-04-20 06:18:07 UTC
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Post by George Dance
Icicle Drops
I
Fast from yon icicle's inverted spire,
Yon shining minims, glittering in the sun,
Fall brightly down, sheen drops of fluent fire,
Momently hanging, -- sinking, one by one, --
Sliding clear beads as down a silver wire;
So archer-stars shoot thro' abysses dun;
So blood drips down from the knive's fierce desire;
So fall our moments; so our tears do run.
With drop on drop, with everlasting flow,
With changing atom, and revolving sphere,
Our never-resting lives must downward go; --
Still hung in momentary brightness here,
Then sinking to that breast toward which incline
The drops that glow, and eke the beams that shine.
II
The sun, at length, with a more fervent fire,
Hath gained a subtle mastery of the dawn;
And, still more swiftly, from the less'ning spire
The hastening gems descend, till all are gone.
But, lo! they come! The vanish'd ones surprise
In golden mist, my wistful, musing sight;
Soul o' th' earth, its exhalations rise,
And soon the drops return to air and light.
There shall they hang 'mid purple glooms aloof,
Or shine supreme in Iris' circling woof.
Wherein his married hues the sun doth weave.
And so this falling life shall not remain
Sunk in the earth; 'twill rise to Heaven again.
- Arthur John Lockhart, 1895
http://gdancesbetty.blogspot.ca/2011/03/icicle-drops-arthur-john-lockhart.html
Helpful.....
Another good find, Zod.

General Zod
2019-04-16 23:47:01 UTC
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Post by George Dance
Icicle Drops
I
Fast from yon icicle's inverted spire,
Yon shining minims, glittering in the sun,
Fall brightly down, sheen drops of fluent fire,
Momently hanging, -- sinking, one by one, --
Sliding clear beads as down a silver wire;
So archer-stars shoot thro' abysses dun;
So blood drips down from the knive's fierce desire;
So fall our moments; so our tears do run.
With drop on drop, with everlasting flow,
With changing atom, and revolving sphere,
Our never-resting lives must downward go; --
Still hung in momentary brightness here,
Then sinking to that breast toward which incline
The drops that glow, and eke the beams that shine.
II
The sun, at length, with a more fervent fire,
Hath gained a subtle mastery of the dawn;
And, still more swiftly, from the less'ning spire
The hastening gems descend, till all are gone.
But, lo! they come! The vanish'd ones surprise
In golden mist, my wistful, musing sight;
Soul o' th' earth, its exhalations rise,
And soon the drops return to air and light.
There shall they hang 'mid purple glooms aloof,
Or shine supreme in Iris' circling woof.
Wherein his married hues the sun doth weave.
And so this falling life shall not remain
Sunk in the earth; 'twill rise to Heaven again.
- Arthur John Lockhart, 1895
http://gdancesbetty.blogspot.ca/2011/03/icicle-drops-arthur-john-lockhart.html
Great read G.D.
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