Discussion:
Poetry Profiles #2 - Ahmos Zu-Bolton
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Will Dockery
2014-03-07 22:23:34 UTC
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"There is a cure for the Blues
[...]
A white cabbie says there ain't never
been no/great colored poets
[...]
and I think to myself man
this cat is hip/ smooth,
there's truth in his meter,
so I sez to him I say, hey man,
how come a professor like you
is driving a cab?"
-Ahmos Zu-Bolton, fair use excerpt from "Taxicab Blues".

Ahmos Zu-Bolton II (October 21, 1948,[1] Poplarville, Mississippi - March 8,
2005[2]) was an activist, poet and playwright also known for his editing and
publishing endeavors on behalf of African-American culture.

Read more at:
http://pennyspoetry.wikia.com/wiki/Ahmos_Zu-Bolton
Will Dockery
2014-03-22 19:46:21 UTC
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http://pennyspoetry.wikia.com/wiki/Ahmos_Zu-Bolton

Our 1976 Carver High "poet in residence" Ahmos Zu-Bolton, who used to hang out in Dan Barfield's class a lot. He was a big influence on my early poetry, they way he just put it down like it was happening, mixed with myth and street corner surrealism... sorry to see that he passed away a few years back.
Will Dockery
2018-12-15 16:56:29 UTC
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http://pennyspoetry.wikia.com/wiki/Ahmos_Zu-Bolton
Post by Will Dockery
Our 1976 Carver High "poet in residence" Ahmos Zu-Bolton, who used to hang out in Dan Barfield's class a lot. He was a big influence on my early poetry, they way he just put it down like it was happening, mixed with myth and street corner surrealism... sorry to see that he passed away a few years back.
My earlier post on Zu-Bolton, and, reading his Wiki bio, I see a clear connection as to where and how he wound up in Columbus and at Carver High during 1976.

Being a Vietnam veteran, he was very likely stationed at nearby Fort Benning (which also ties in with how he became friends with Barfield, who had just done two tours of duty in Vietnam before becoming an English teacher at Carver):

"After serving in the U.S. Army in Vietnam, Zu-Bolton founded Hoo-Doo, a magazine devoted to African-American activism and arts, published A Niggered Amen: Poems, and co-edited Synergy D.C. Anthology, in 1975. He also opened the Copestetic Bookstore on Marigny Street in New Orleans, LA..."

That's all I have on this right now, but anyone who is familiar with the Army and the relationship it has to Columbus, will see a clear logical answer to these questions.
Michael Pendragon
2018-12-15 17:12:36 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
http://pennyspoetry.wikia.com/wiki/Ahmos_Zu-Bolton
Post by Will Dockery
Our 1976 Carver High "poet in residence" Ahmos Zu-Bolton, who used to hang out in Dan Barfield's class a lot. He was a big influence on my early poetry, they way he just put it down like it was happening, mixed with myth and street corner surrealism... sorry to see that he passed away a few years back.
My earlier post on Zu-Bolton, and, reading his Wiki bio, I see a clear connection as to where and how he wound up in Columbus and at Carver High during 1976.
"After serving in the U.S. Army in Vietnam, Zu-Bolton founded Hoo-Doo, a magazine devoted to African-American activism and arts, published A Niggered Amen: Poems, and co-edited Synergy D.C. Anthology, in 1975. He also opened the Copestetic Bookstore on Marigny Street in New Orleans, LA..."
That's all I have on this right now, but anyone who is familiar with the Army and the relationship it has to Columbus, will see a clear logical answer to these questions.
George posts a mini-bio on Bolton based partly on your claim that he had been the Shitholeville High poet-in-residence, and you cite George's post as "proof."

Amazing.
Will Dockery
2018-12-15 17:31:12 UTC
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Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
http://pennyspoetry.wikia.com/wiki/Ahmos_Zu-Bolton
Post by Will Dockery
Our 1976 Carver High "poet in residence" Ahmos Zu-Bolton, who used to hang out in Dan Barfield's class a lot. He was a big influence on my early poetry, they way he just put it down like it was happening, mixed with myth and street corner surrealism... sorry to see that he passed away a few years back.
My earlier post on Zu-Bolton, and, reading his Wiki bio, I see a clear connection as to where and how he wound up in Columbus and at Carver High during 1976.
"After serving in the U.S. Army in Vietnam, Zu-Bolton founded Hoo-Doo, a magazine devoted to African-American activism and arts, published A Niggered Amen: Poems, and co-edited Synergy D.C. Anthology, in 1975. He also opened the Copestetic Bookstore on Marigny Street in New Orleans, LA..."
That's all I have on this right now, but anyone who is familiar with the Army and the relationship it has to Columbus, will see a clear logical answer to these questions.
George posts a mini-bio on Bolton based partly on your claim that he had been the Shitholeville High poet-in-residence, and you cite George's post as "proof."
Amazing.
Proof of what? That Zu-Bolton was in the Army and served in Vietnam, and that he was in that case very likely to have been stationed at Fort Benning, which is less than two miles from Carver High School?

American military personnel of the Vietnam War

https://www.revolvy.com/main/index.php?fldrs=20869&uid=389&sr=250

Ahmos Zu-Bolton II

https://www.revolvy.com/page/Ahmos-Zu%252DBolton

I'm not calling it "proof", but it is getting there.
NancyGene
2018-12-15 17:35:17 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
http://pennyspoetry.wikia.com/wiki/Ahmos_Zu-Bolton
Post by Will Dockery
Our 1976 Carver High "poet in residence" Ahmos Zu-Bolton, who used to hang out in Dan Barfield's class a lot. He was a big influence on my early poetry, they way he just put it down like it was happening, mixed with myth and street corner surrealism... sorry to see that he passed away a few years back.
My earlier post on Zu-Bolton, and, reading his Wiki bio, I see a clear connection as to where and how he wound up in Columbus and at Carver High during 1976.
"After serving in the U.S. Army in Vietnam, Zu-Bolton founded Hoo-Doo, a magazine devoted to African-American activism and arts, published A Niggered Amen: Poems, and co-edited Synergy D.C. Anthology, in 1975. He also opened the Copestetic Bookstore on Marigny Street in New Orleans, LA..."
That's all I have on this right now, but anyone who is familiar with the Army and the relationship it has to Columbus, will see a clear logical answer to these questions.
George posts a mini-bio on Bolton based partly on your claim that he had been the Shitholeville High poet-in-residence, and you cite George's post as "proof."
Amazing.
Proof of what? That Zu-Bolton was in the Army and served in Vietnam, and that he was in that case very likely to have been stationed at Fort Benning, which is less than two miles from Carver High School?
American military personnel of the Vietnam War
https://www.revolvy.com/main/index.php?fldrs=20869&uid=389&sr=250
Ahmos Zu-Bolton II
https://www.revolvy.com/page/Ahmos-Zu%252DBolton
I'm not calling it "proof", but it is getting there.
And he very likely never wanted to see the place again. How does someone manage to get hired as a poet in residence at a high school he never went to for a period of less than a year? No contract? No rules? Just hang around the classroom? Who paid him. Why wasn't this in the newspaper, and who did a background check for him to be hanging around a high school?
Will Dockery
2018-12-15 17:42:43 UTC
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http://pennyspoetry.wikia.com/wiki/Ahmos_Zu-Bolton
Post by NancyGene
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
Our 1976 Carver High "poet in residence" Ahmos Zu-Bolton, who used to hang out in Dan Barfield's class a lot. He was a big influence on my early poetry, they way he just put it down like it was happening, mixed with myth and street corner surrealism... sorry to see that he passed away a few years back.
My earlier post on Zu-Bolton, and, reading his Wiki bio, I see a clear connection as to where and how he wound up in Columbus and at Carver High during 1976.
"After serving in the U.S. Army in Vietnam, Zu-Bolton founded Hoo-Doo, a magazine devoted to African-American activism and arts, published A Niggered Amen: Poems, and co-edited Synergy D.C. Anthology, in 1975. He also opened the Copestetic Bookstore on Marigny Street in New Orleans, LA..."
That's all I have on this right now, but anyone who is familiar with the Army and the relationship it has to Columbus, will see a clear logical answer to these questions.
George posts a mini-bio on Bolton based partly on your claim that he had been the Shitholeville High poet-in-residence, and you cite George's post as "proof."
Amazing.
Proof of what? That Zu-Bolton was in the Army and served in Vietnam, and that he was in that case very likely to have been stationed at Fort Benning, which is less than two miles from Carver High School?
American military personnel of the Vietnam War
https://www.revolvy.com/main/index.php?fldrs=20869&uid=389&sr=250
Ahmos Zu-Bolton II
https://www.revolvy.com/page/Ahmos-Zu%252DBolton
I'm not calling it "proof", but it is getting there.
And he very likely never wanted to see the place again. How does someone manage to get hired as a poet in residence at a high school he never went to for a period of less than a year? No contract? No rules? Just hang around the classroom? Who paid him. Why wasn't this in the newspaper, and who did a background check for him to be hanging around a high school?
Okay, all good questions that I also hope we can find the answers to... perhaps Dan Barfield will have some of the answers.
George Sulzbach
2018-12-15 18:26:35 UTC
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Post by NancyGene
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
http://pennyspoetry.wikia.com/wiki/Ahmos_Zu-Bolton
Post by Will Dockery
Our 1976 Carver High "poet in residence" Ahmos Zu-Bolton, who used to hang out in Dan Barfield's class a lot. He was a big influence on my early poetry, they way he just put it down like it was happening, mixed with myth and street corner surrealism... sorry to see that he passed away a few years back.
My earlier post on Zu-Bolton, and, reading his Wiki bio, I see a clear connection as to where and how he wound up in Columbus and at Carver High during 1976.
"After serving in the U.S. Army in Vietnam, Zu-Bolton founded Hoo-Doo, a magazine devoted to African-American activism and arts, published A Niggered Amen: Poems, and co-edited Synergy D.C. Anthology, in 1975. He also opened the Copestetic Bookstore on Marigny Street in New Orleans, LA..."
That's all I have on this right now, but anyone who is familiar with the Army and the relationship it has to Columbus, will see a clear logical answer to these questions.
George posts a mini-bio on Bolton based partly on your claim that he had been the Shitholeville High poet-in-residence, and you cite George's post as "proof."
Amazing.
Proof of what? That Zu-Bolton was in the Army and served in Vietnam, and that he was in that case very likely to have been stationed at Fort Benning, which is less than two miles from Carver High School?
American military personnel of the Vietnam War
https://www.revolvy.com/main/index.php?fldrs=20869&uid=389&sr=250
Ahmos Zu-Bolton II
https://www.revolvy.com/page/Ahmos-Zu%252DBolton
I'm not calling it "proof", but it is getting there.
And he very likely never wanted to see the place again. How does someone manage to get hired as a poet in residence at a high school he never went to for a period of less than a year? No contract? No rules? Just hang around the classroom? Who paid him. Why wasn't this in the newspaper, and who did a background check for him to be hanging around a high school?
He liked children, I mean Really liked them. IYKWIMAITYD
Me
2018-12-15 18:30:45 UTC
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Post by NancyGene
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
http://pennyspoetry.wikia.com/wiki/Ahmos_Zu-Bolton
Post by Will Dockery
Our 1976 Carver High "poet in residence" Ahmos Zu-Bolton, who used to hang out in Dan Barfield's class a lot. He was a big influence on my early poetry, they way he just put it down like it was happening, mixed with myth and street corner surrealism... sorry to see that he passed away a few years back.
My earlier post on Zu-Bolton, and, reading his Wiki bio, I see a clear connection as to where and how he wound up in Columbus and at Carver High during 1976.
"After serving in the U.S. Army in Vietnam, Zu-Bolton founded Hoo-Doo, a magazine devoted to African-American activism and arts, published A Niggered Amen: Poems, and co-edited Synergy D.C. Anthology, in 1975. He also opened the Copestetic Bookstore on Marigny Street in New Orleans, LA..."
That's all I have on this right now, but anyone who is familiar with the Army and the relationship it has to Columbus, will see a clear logical answer to these questions.
George posts a mini-bio on Bolton based partly on your claim that he had been the Shitholeville High poet-in-residence, and you cite George's post as "proof."
Amazing.
Proof of what? That Zu-Bolton was in the Army and served in Vietnam, and that he was in that case very likely to have been stationed at Fort Benning, which is less than two miles from Carver High School?
American military personnel of the Vietnam War
https://www.revolvy.com/main/index.php?fldrs=20869&uid=389&sr=250
Ahmos Zu-Bolton II
https://www.revolvy.com/page/Ahmos-Zu%252DBolton
I'm not calling it "proof", but it is getting there.
And he very likely never wanted to see the place again. How does someone manage to get hired as a poet in residence at a high school he never went to for a period of less than a year? No contract? No rules? Just hang around the classroom? Who paid him. Why wasn't this in the newspaper, and who did a background check for him to be hanging around a high school?
NG, you noticed the ‘very likely’ phrase. Great deflection on his part.
NancyGene
2018-12-15 18:47:29 UTC
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Post by Me
Post by NancyGene
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
http://pennyspoetry.wikia.com/wiki/Ahmos_Zu-Bolton
Post by Will Dockery
Our 1976 Carver High "poet in residence" Ahmos Zu-Bolton, who used to hang out in Dan Barfield's class a lot. He was a big influence on my early poetry, they way he just put it down like it was happening, mixed with myth and street corner surrealism... sorry to see that he passed away a few years back.
My earlier post on Zu-Bolton, and, reading his Wiki bio, I see a clear connection as to where and how he wound up in Columbus and at Carver High during 1976.
"After serving in the U.S. Army in Vietnam, Zu-Bolton founded Hoo-Doo, a magazine devoted to African-American activism and arts, published A Niggered Amen: Poems, and co-edited Synergy D.C. Anthology, in 1975. He also opened the Copestetic Bookstore on Marigny Street in New Orleans, LA..."
That's all I have on this right now, but anyone who is familiar with the Army and the relationship it has to Columbus, will see a clear logical answer to these questions.
George posts a mini-bio on Bolton based partly on your claim that he had been the Shitholeville High poet-in-residence, and you cite George's post as "proof."
Amazing.
Proof of what? That Zu-Bolton was in the Army and served in Vietnam, and that he was in that case very likely to have been stationed at Fort Benning, which is less than two miles from Carver High School?
American military personnel of the Vietnam War
https://www.revolvy.com/main/index.php?fldrs=20869&uid=389&sr=250
Ahmos Zu-Bolton II
https://www.revolvy.com/page/Ahmos-Zu%252DBolton
I'm not calling it "proof", but it is getting there.
And he very likely never wanted to see the place again. How does someone manage to get hired as a poet in residence at a high school he never went to for a period of less than a year? No contract? No rules? Just hang around the classroom? Who paid him. Why wasn't this in the newspaper, and who did a background check for him to be hanging around a high school?
NG, you noticed the ‘very likely’ phrase. Great deflection on his part.
Yes, he was giving himself an out in case the guy turned out to have been John Bolton, who wanted to deport Will.
Bad Bad Leroy Brown
2018-12-24 04:41:43 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
http://pennyspoetry.wikia.com/wiki/Ahmos_Zu-Bolton
Post by Will Dockery
Our 1976 Carver High "poet in residence" Ahmos Zu-Bolton, who used to hang out in Dan Barfield's class a lot. He was a big influence on my early poetry, they way he just put it down like it was happening, mixed with myth and street corner surrealism... sorry to see that he passed away a few years back.
My earlier post on Zu-Bolton, and, reading his Wiki bio, I see a clear connection as to where and how he wound up in Columbus and at Carver High during 1976.
"After serving in the U.S. Army in Vietnam, Zu-Bolton founded Hoo-Doo, a magazine devoted to African-American activism and arts, published A Niggered Amen: Poems, and co-edited Synergy D.C. Anthology, in 1975. He also opened the Copestetic Bookstore on Marigny Street in New Orleans, LA..."
That's all I have on this right now, but anyone who is familiar with the Army and the relationship it has to Columbus, will see a clear logical answer to these questions.
Interesting back story.................
Bad Bad Leroy Brown
2018-12-28 11:26:07 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
http://pennyspoetry.wikia.com/wiki/Ahmos_Zu-Bolton
Post by Will Dockery
Our 1976 Carver High "poet in residence" Ahmos Zu-Bolton, who used to hang out in Dan Barfield's class a lot. He was a big influence on my early poetry, they way he just put it down like it was happening, mixed with myth and street corner surrealism... sorry to see that he passed away a few years back.
My earlier post on Zu-Bolton, and, reading his Wiki bio, I see a clear connection as to where and how he wound up in Columbus and at Carver High during 1976.
"After serving in the U.S. Army in Vietnam, Zu-Bolton founded Hoo-Doo, a magazine devoted to African-American activism and arts, published A Niggered Amen: Poems, and co-edited Synergy D.C. Anthology, in 1975. He also opened the Copestetic Bookstore on Marigny Street in New Orleans, LA..."
That's all I have on this right now, but anyone who is familiar with the Army and the relationship it has to Columbus, will see a clear logical answer to these questions.
Interestin for another read...………...
Will Dockery
2018-12-15 20:31:00 UTC
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The details fit, so far.
NancyGene
2018-12-15 21:46:09 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
The details fit, so far.
You have no details. The guy was in Louisiana and Ohio and other places to read his poetry. He was visiting professor in Missouri. He published his Hoo-Doo magazine in 1975 and between 1973 and 1976 was in Washington D.C. and worked at Howard University. We see two years of birth for him: 1935 and 1948.

There are two army bases in Louisiana: Fort Polk and Camp Beauregard. Fort Benning is not the capital of the world for everyone.
General Zod
2018-12-15 22:30:59 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
"There is a cure for the Blues
[...]
A white cabbie says there ain't never
been no/great colored poets
[...]
and I think to myself man
this cat is hip/ smooth,
there's truth in his meter,
so I sez to him I say, hey man,
how come a professor like you
is driving a cab?"
-Ahmos Zu-Bolton, fair use excerpt from "Taxicab Blues".
Ahmos Zu-Bolton II (October 21, 1948,[1] Poplarville, Mississippi - March 8,
2005[2]) was an activist, poet and playwright also known for his editing and
publishing endeavors on behalf of African-American culture.
http://pennyspoetry.wikia.com/wiki/Ahmos_Zu-Bolton
Outstanding black poet and man........................
Will Dockery
2018-12-16 15:59:42 UTC
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If you can find scans of 1976 issues of Pegasus or The Carverlite, you may find your proof that Ahmos Zu-Bolton was more than an illusion in Columbus Georgia in Spring of 1976.

😊
NancyGene
2018-12-16 16:02:33 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
If you can find scans of 1976 issues of Pegasus or The Carverlite, you may find your proof that Ahmos Zu-Bolton was more than an illusion in Columbus Georgia in Spring of 1976.
The burden of proof is on you, Will, since you made the claim. You are in Columbus--find 1976 local publications yourself and prove that Zu-Bolton was there. Until then, what you say is unproven.
Will Dockery
2018-12-16 16:37:03 UTC
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Post by NancyGene
Post by Will Dockery
If you can find scans of 1976 issues of Pegasus or The Carverlite, you may find your proof that Ahmos Zu-Bolton was more than an illusion in Columbus Georgia in Spring of 1976.
The burden of proof is on you, Will, since you made the claim. You are in Columbus--find 1976 local publications yourself and prove that Zu-Bolton was there. Until then, what you say is unproven.
I do have one copy of Pegasus, the 1976 literary magazine... somewhere here in my archives. It may take hours or days to locate it and scan it, but I will, whether it contains anything by or about Ahmos Zu-Bolton or not.

My poem "Neon Bones" was published there, so that will be of interest, as well.
Michael Pendragon
2018-12-16 20:00:30 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Post by NancyGene
Post by Will Dockery
If you can find scans of 1976 issues of Pegasus or The Carverlite, you may find your proof that Ahmos Zu-Bolton was more than an illusion in Columbus Georgia in Spring of 1976.
The burden of proof is on you, Will, since you made the claim. You are in Columbus--find 1976 local publications yourself and prove that Zu-Bolton was there. Until then, what you say is unproven.
I do have one copy of Pegasus, the 1976 literary magazine... somewhere here in my archives. It may take hours or days to locate it and scan it, but I will, whether it contains anything by or about Ahmos Zu-Bolton or not.
That answers none of my questions, Will.
Post by Will Dockery
My poem "Neon Bones" was published there, so that will be of interest, as well.
No, it won't be.
Michael Pendragon
2018-12-16 16:24:18 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
If you can find scans of 1976 issues of Pegasus or The Carverlite, you may find your proof that Ahmos Zu-Bolton was more than an illusion in Columbus Georgia in Spring of 1976.
Was he employed as an English Lit teacher? Did you take a class that he taught? Did he compliment you on your (cough) writing ability?
Will Dockery
2018-12-16 16:07:06 UTC
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I know... exactly as I've been saying about the claims that you and Pendragon have been making about Stephan Pickering.

Fair enough... if we can't post proof of something, our claims remain unproven.

Mine /and/ yours.

😊
NancyGene
2018-12-16 16:11:45 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
I know... exactly as I've been saying about the claims that you and Pendragon have been making about Stephan Pickering.
Fair enough... if we can't post proof of something, our claims remain unproven.
Mine /and/ yours.
Michael has posted full quotes and letters from the scans he has of what Pickering wrote to Ackerman and Ginsberg. Those are fully vetted and verifiable.
Will Dockery
2018-12-16 20:53:31 UTC
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Sure, Pendragon, I understand how one of my early poems would not be of interest to you.

Feel free to ignore and skip that one.

😊
Me
2018-12-16 22:15:34 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Sure, Pendragon, I understand how one of my early poems would not be of interest to you.
Feel free to ignore and skip that one.
😊
Post where this guy was at your high school while you were enrolled.
Nothing else about your high school years is of interest. Only the facts about this Bolton fellow would be of anyone else’s interest here will.
George J. Dance
2018-12-17 19:50:01 UTC
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Post by Me
Post by Will Dockery
Sure, Pendragon, I understand how one of my early poems would not be of interest to you.
Feel free to ignore and skip that one.
😊
Post where this guy was at your high school while you were enrolled.
"Poet In Residence Edit
by Will Dockery
"I linger here for the mountains the waters, and the shadows only … this tribe ain’t mine." -Ahmos Zu-Bolton

Zu-Bolton was an African-American Beat poet of the 1970s who touched lives as a “poet” in the classrooms of Virginia, Georgia and Texas. He was instrumental to college campuses adding new bodies of thought about poetry and color, as a writer of poetry collections such as Fishpond Australia, Ain't No Spring Chicken, Hoo-Doo, and A Niggered Amen, which was published December 1 1975. Ahmos Zu-Bolton was Resident Poet at Carver High School in Columbus, Georgia in the spring of 1976, where he met, taught and was a major influence on the life and poetry of Will Dockery, and, the next year, Grace Cavalieri

In 1977 he took my first full-length poetry book Body Fluids for distribution and sent me the first check I ever received for poetry. I think it was $7.00 or $8.00. He reached across race to include me. Connections. Interconnectedness is more like it. Ahmos was most of all deeply connected to his own family in De Ridder, LA and spoke often of a father who thought he could do anything and let his son think the same. -Grace Cavalieri
In Washington, D.C., Ethelbert Miller became his historian. Zu-Bolton was co-director to Miller's Directorship of the Afro American Resource Center at Howard University; and, there still exists in D.C. a community of poets who will always revere and love him. He teamed up with artists in New Orleans, Galveston, Austin and Houston to produce his HooDoo Festivals.
While living in New Orleans he taught English, African American Studies and Creative Writing at Xavier University, Tulane University and Delgado Community College. He was Visiting Writer in Residence at University of Missouri. When Zu Bolton died in 2005, that college held a candlelight vigil. And, he connected with the old as well as the young: he and his wife, poet Harryette Mullen, worked with senior citizens in 1978, teaching and encouraging their life stories."

https://pennyspoetry.wikia.com/wiki/Ahmos_Zu-Bolton#Poet_In_Residence
Will Dockery
2018-12-17 19:59:17 UTC
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Post by George J. Dance
Post by Me
Post by Will Dockery
Sure, Pendragon, I understand how one of my early poems would not be of interest to you.
Feel free to ignore and skip that one.
😊
Post where this guy was at your high school while you were enrolled.
"Poet In Residence Edit
Thanks George, looks good, although I don't really think I need a by-line here, since much of it was imported from Wikipedia.
Post by George J. Dance
"I linger here for the mountains the waters, and the shadows only … this tribe ain’t mine." -Ahmos Zu-Bolton
Zu-Bolton was an African-American Beat poet of the 1970s who touched lives as a “poet” in the classrooms of Virginia, Georgia and Texas. He was instrumental to college campuses adding new bodies of thought about poetry and color, as a writer of poetry collections such as Fishpond Australia, Ain't No Spring Chicken, Hoo-Doo, and A Niggered Amen, which was published December 1 1975. Ahmos Zu-Bolton was Resident Poet at Carver High School in Columbus, Georgia in the spring of 1976, where he met, taught and was a major influence on the life and poetry of Will Dockery, and, the next year, Grace Cavalieri
In 1977 he took my first full-length poetry book Body Fluids for distribution and sent me the first check I ever received for poetry. I think it was $7.00 or $8.00. He reached across race to include me. Connections. Interconnectedness is more like it. Ahmos was most of all deeply connected to his own family in De Ridder, LA and spoke often of a father who thought he could do anything and let his son think the same. -Grace Cavalieri
In Washington, D.C., Ethelbert Miller became his historian. Zu-Bolton was co-director to Miller's Directorship of the Afro American Resource Center at Howard University; and, there still exists in D.C. a community of poets who will always revere and love him. He teamed up with artists in New Orleans, Galveston, Austin and Houston to produce his HooDoo Festivals.
While living in New Orleans he taught English, African American Studies and Creative Writing at Xavier University, Tulane University and Delgado Community College. He was Visiting Writer in Residence at University of Missouri. When Zu Bolton died in 2005, that college held a candlelight vigil. And, he connected with the old as well as the young: he and his wife, poet Harryette Mullen, worked with senior citizens in 1978, teaching and encouraging their life stories."
https://pennyspoetry.wikia.com/wiki/Ahmos_Zu-Bolton#Poet_In_Residence
Again, looking good, though.
Dental River
2018-12-17 23:33:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Me
Post by Will Dockery
Sure, Pendragon, I understand how one of my early poems would not be of interest to you.
Feel free to ignore and skip that one.
😊
Post where this guy was at your high school while you were enrolled.
"Poet In Residence Edit
by Will Dockery
"I linger here for the mountains the waters, and the shadows only … this tribe ain’t mine." -Ahmos Zu-Bolton
Zu-Bolton was an African-American Beat poet of the 1970s who touched lives as a “poet” in the classrooms of Virginia, Georgia and Texas. He was instrumental to college campuses adding new bodies of thought about poetry and color, as a writer of poetry collections such as Fishpond Australia, Ain't No Spring Chicken, Hoo-Doo, and A Niggered Amen, which was published December 1 1975. Ahmos Zu-Bolton was Resident Poet at Carver High School in Columbus, Georgia in the spring of 1976, where he met, taught and was a major influence on the life and poetry of Will Dockery, and, the next year, Grace Cavalieri
In 1977 he took my first full-length poetry book Body Fluids for distribution and sent me the first check I ever received for poetry. I think it was $7.00 or $8.00. He reached across race to include me. Connections. Interconnectedness is more like it. Ahmos was most of all deeply connected to his own family in De Ridder, LA and spoke often of a father who thought he could do anything and let his son think the same. -Grace Cavalieri
Here's where the shoddy rubber leaves the road. There's no indication through Will's disingenuous syntax that he ever really met or was mentored by Ahmos. He hopes Grace's recollection blends artfully with his implied relationship to Ahmos, and that you rubes can't tell the difference. This is Will's only effective use of language, on behalf of some of the people, some of the time.
Post by George J. Dance
https://pennyspoetry.wikia.com/wiki/Ahmos_Zu-Bolton#Poet_In_Residence
NancyGene
2018-12-17 23:54:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dental River
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Me
Post by Will Dockery
Sure, Pendragon, I understand how one of my early poems would not be of interest to you.
Feel free to ignore and skip that one.
😊
Post where this guy was at your high school while you were enrolled.
"Poet In Residence Edit
by Will Dockery
"I linger here for the mountains the waters, and the shadows only … this tribe ain’t mine." -Ahmos Zu-Bolton
Zu-Bolton was an African-American Beat poet of the 1970s who touched lives as a “poet” in the classrooms of Virginia, Georgia and Texas. He was instrumental to college campuses adding new bodies of thought about poetry and color, as a writer of poetry collections such as Fishpond Australia, Ain't No Spring Chicken, Hoo-Doo, and A Niggered Amen, which was published December 1 1975. Ahmos Zu-Bolton was Resident Poet at Carver High School in Columbus, Georgia in the spring of 1976, where he met, taught and was a major influence on the life and poetry of Will Dockery, and, the next year, Grace Cavalieri
In 1977 he took my first full-length poetry book Body Fluids for distribution and sent me the first check I ever received for poetry. I think it was $7.00 or $8.00. He reached across race to include me. Connections. Interconnectedness is more like it. Ahmos was most of all deeply connected to his own family in De Ridder, LA and spoke often of a father who thought he could do anything and let his son think the same. -Grace Cavalieri
Here's where the shoddy rubber leaves the road. There's no indication through Will's disingenuous syntax that he ever really met or was mentored by Ahmos. He hopes Grace's recollection blends artfully with his implied relationship to Ahmos, and that you rubes can't tell the difference. This is Will's only effective use of language, on behalf of some of the people, some of the time.
Post by George J. Dance
https://pennyspoetry.wikia.com/wiki/Ahmos_Zu-Bolton#Poet_In_Residence
Many details sound dodgy in the chronicles of Ahmos Zu-Bolton. The two birth years, but with the same details of his life (he and his father are not the same person, duh), gaps in his work experience and whereabouts, no years of military service stated, and of course the claim (only by Will Dockery) that despite Zu-Bolton having a publishing company in another state and teaching at universities, he wanted to lurk around Carver High School in Columbus because it had an Army base. He did this without any newspaper noting it. He was not included in the yearbook. Yet, he took an interest in a high school junior who had repeated a grade or two in the past because?
Will Dockery
2018-12-18 00:02:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
One fact remains in Zu-Bolton's history is I did know him during his time at Carver High School in Spring of 1976.
General Zod
2018-12-18 00:18:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
One fact remains in Zu-Bolton's history is I did know him during his time at Carver High School in Spring of 1976.
Egg zackley....................
NancyGene
2018-12-18 00:27:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
One fact remains in Zu-Bolton's history is I did know him during his time at Carver High School in Spring of 1976.
It is not a fact, it is an assertion--by you--which you cannot prove. Who else was visiting your school? Superman? Hitler? Robert E. Lee?
Will Dockery
2018-12-21 17:40:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Me
Post by Will Dockery
Sure, Pendragon, I understand how one of my early poems would not be of
interest to you.
Feel free to ignore and skip that one.
😊
Post where this guy was at your high school while you were enrolled.
"Poet In Residence Edit
by Will Dockery
"I linger here for the mountains the waters, and the shadows only … this
tribe ain’t mine." -Ahmos Zu-Bolton

Zu-Bolton was an African-American Beat poet of the 1970s who touched lives
as a “poet” in the classrooms of Virginia, Georgia and Texas. He was
instrumental to college campuses adding new bodies of thought about poetry
and color, as a writer of poetry collections such as Fishpond Australia,
Ain't No Spring Chicken, Hoo-Doo, and A Niggered Amen, which was published
December 1 1975. Ahmos Zu-Bolton was Resident Poet at Carver High School in
Columbus, Georgia in the spring of 1976, where he met, taught and was a
major influence on the life and poetry of Will Dockery, and, the next year,
Grace Cavalieri

In 1977 he took my first full-length poetry book Body Fluids for
distribution and sent me the first check I ever received for poetry. I think
it was $7.00 or $8.00. He reached across race to include me. Connections.
Interconnectedness is more like it. Ahmos was most of all deeply connected
to his own family in De Ridder, LA and spoke often of a father who thought
he could do anything and let his son think the same. -Grace Cavalieri
In Washington, D.C., Ethelbert Miller became his historian. Zu-Bolton was
co-director to Miller's Directorship of the Afro American Resource Center at
Howard University; and, there still exists in D.C. a community of poets who
will always revere and love him. He teamed up with artists in New Orleans,
Galveston, Austin and Houston to produce his HooDoo Festivals.
While living in New Orleans he taught English, African American Studies and
Creative Writing at Xavier University, Tulane University and Delgado
Community College. He was Visiting Writer in Residence at University of
Missouri. When Zu Bolton died in 2005, that college held a candlelight
vigil. And, he connected with the old as well as the young: he and his wife,
poet Harryette Mullen, worked with senior citizens in 1978, teaching and
encouraging their life stories."

https://pennyspoetry.wikia.com/wiki/Ahmos_Zu-Bolton#Poet_In_Residence

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Thanks again, George.
General Zod
2018-12-16 22:19:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
"There is a cure for the Blues
[...]
A white cabbie says there ain't never
been no/great colored poets
[...]
and I think to myself man
this cat is hip/ smooth,
there's truth in his meter,
so I sez to him I say, hey man,
how come a professor like you
is driving a cab?"
-Ahmos Zu-Bolton, fair use excerpt from "Taxicab Blues".
Ahmos Zu-Bolton II (October 21, 1948,[1] Poplarville, Mississippi - March 8,
2005[2]) was an activist, poet and playwright also known for his editing and
publishing endeavors on behalf of African-American culture.
http://pennyspoetry.wikia.com/wiki/Ahmos_Zu-Bolton
I found this..............

https://aaregistry.org/story/ahmos-zu-bolton-ii-a-writer-and-teacher/

*Ahmos Zu-Bolton II was born in 1948. He was an African American poet, playwright, educator, editor, and publisher.

From Poplarville, Mississippi, Zu-Bolton grew up in DeRidder, Louisiana, near the Texas border. His father was a career soldier who rose to the rank of sergeant major in the United States Army. In 1965, he was one of several Black students who integrated Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge. After serving in the Army in Vietnam, Zu-Bolton founded Hoo-Doo, a magazine devoted to African-American activism and arts, and published A Niggered Amen: Poems and co edited Synergy D.C. Anthology in 1975.

Other publications by Zu-Bolton include Ain’t No Spring Chicken (Voice Foundation, Inc., 1998), a collection of poetry and folklore, and 1946: A Poem (Ishmael Reed, 2002). His work has appeared in numerous magazines and in the anthologies Giant Talk, Mississippi Writers: Reflections of Childhood and Youth, Vol. III, and Black Southern Voices: An Anthology of Fiction Poetry, Drama, Nonfiction, and Critical Essays (1992).

In addition to his poetry, Zu-Bolton has written several plays, including The Widow Paris: A Folklore of Marie Laveau, The Funeral, Family Reunion, and The Break-In. He died March 8, 2005, at Howard University Medical Center in Washington, D.C.

Reference:
The Department of English
University of Mississippi, MS 38677
Will Dockery
2018-12-16 23:26:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Good archival material, Zod.

I notice that Zu-Bolton reached a high rank in the Military, which connects with the Fort Benning relationship.
Michael Pendragon
2018-12-17 03:45:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Good archival material, Zod.
I notice that Zu-Bolton reached a high rank in the Military, which connects with the Fort Benning relationship.
More bullshit.

You're obviously afraid to answer any of my questions.

So let's pretend that you never implied that he was a teacher at your high school while you were a student there. And let's pretend that you'd never implied that he'd acted as any sort of mentor to you.

Here are some newer, easier questions for you:

1) Did you ever see him at your high school?
2) If so, did he ever discuss poetry with you?
NancyGene
2018-12-17 13:30:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Good archival material, Zod.
I notice that Zu-Bolton reached a high rank in the Military, which connects with the Fort Benning relationship.
Will, your lack of reading skills bites you in the ass again. It wasn't the poet Zu-Bolton who rose to a high rank--it was his FATHER.

"His father was a career soldier who rose to the rank of sergeant major in the United States Army"

It still hasn't been established whether he was born in 1935 or 1948. There are two versions, so someone was lying somewhere.
Will Dockery
2018-12-17 16:03:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by NancyGene
It still hasn't been established whether he was born in 1935 or 1948.
There are two versions
I've been seeing that, such as:

http://douglangsdcpoetryblog.blogspot.com/2007/08/ahmos-zu-bolton-ii.html

"Ahmos was born Oct. 21, 1935, in Poplarville, Mississippi, and he died March 8, 2005, at Howard University Medical Center in Washington, D.C. He was 69 years old..."
Will Dockery
2018-12-17 03:48:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I've already stated that I met Zu-Bolton in the spring of 1976 at Carver High School, where he was the poet in residence, Pendragon.
m***@gmail.com
2018-12-17 04:17:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
I've already stated that I met Zu-Bolton in the spring of 1976 at Carver High School, where he was the poet in residence, Pendragon.
Okay. Then ...

What class/es did he teach?

Did you attend one of his classes?

Did he discuss your poetry with you?
Will Dockery
2018-12-17 15:31:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by m***@gmail.com
What class/es did he teach?
Did you attend one of his classes?
Did he discuss your poetry with you?
I've already stated that I met Zu-Bolton in the spring of 1976 at Carver High School, where he was the poet in residence, so of course the answers to your questions will be "yes".
Michael Pendragon
2018-12-17 17:58:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by m***@gmail.com
What class/es did he teach?
Did you attend one of his classes?
Did he discuss your poetry with you?
I've already stated that I met Zu-Bolton in the spring of 1976 at Carver High School, where he was the poet in residence, so of course the answers to your questions will be "yes".
There's no "of course" about it.

I've met plenty of professors at college who I never took a course or discussed my poetry with.

Did you only "meet" him, or did your relationship extend beyond that?
Will Dockery
2018-12-17 19:07:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Well, Pendragon, I already answered your questions in my original posts about Zu-Bolton.
Michael Pendragon
2018-12-17 19:13:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Well, Pendragon, I already answered your questions in my original posts about Zu-Bolton.
I'll take your evasion to mean that he wasn't your teacher, didn't mentor you, and that you nodded when you passed him in the hall.
Will Dockery
2018-12-17 19:18:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I'm not evading anything, I wrote about Zu-Bolton and where I knew him from in earlier posts.

I can repost those if you're too lazy to scroll back, Pendragon.

😀
Michael Pendragon
2018-12-17 19:27:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
I'm not evading anything, I wrote about Zu-Bolton and where I knew him from in earlier posts.
I can repost those if you're too lazy to scroll back, Pendragon.
No. You said that he used to "hang out" in Dan Barfield's class.

The implication is that he wasn't your teacher (or else you would have said that he taught your English literature class). He wasn't your mentor, as you merely say that his poetry was "an early influence" on yours. And we all know that if he had ever said anything even remotely positive about your poetry, you'd be quoting him in every third post.
Will Dockery
2018-12-17 19:32:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I haven't seen Zu-Bolton since 1976, so some memories are dim, I will grant you.

My statement says all trolls such as yourself need, anyhow, Pendragon.

If someone worth discussing the poet with has a question, such as Dance or Zod, I'll respond.

😊
m***@gmail.com
2018-12-17 19:45:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
I haven't seen Zu-Bolton since 1976, so some memories are dim, I will grant you.
My statement says all trolls such as yourself need, anyhow, Pendragon.
If someone worth discussing the poet with has a question, such as Dance or Zod, I'll respond.
Awwww... did da bad ol' Pendwagon hurt poor widdle Willy's feelings?

https://tenor.com/view/supernatural-bobby-singer-bobby-jim-beaver-beard-gif-5558836
Will Dockery
2018-12-17 23:38:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by m***@gmail.com
Awwww... did da bad ol' Pendwagon hurt poor widdle Willy's feelings?
That's absurd, not in the slightest, Pen.

:)
Michael Pendragon
2018-12-18 03:30:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by m***@gmail.com
Awwww... did da bad ol' Pendwagon hurt poor widdle Willy's feelings?
That's absurd, not in the slightest, Pen.
Right. A pair of gnats just flew into each of your eyes.
Bad Bad Leroy Brown
2018-12-18 00:31:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
"There is a cure for the Blues
[...]
A white cabbie says there ain't never
been no/great colored poets
[...]
and I think to myself man
this cat is hip/ smooth,
there's truth in his meter,
so I sez to him I say, hey man,
how come a professor like you
is driving a cab?"
-Ahmos Zu-Bolton, fair use excerpt from "Taxicab Blues".
Ahmos Zu-Bolton II (October 21, 1948,[1] Poplarville, Mississippi - March 8,
2005[2]) was an activist, poet and playwright also known for his editing and
publishing endeavors on behalf of African-American culture.
http://pennyspoetry.wikia.com/wiki/Ahmos_Zu-Bolton
I was still up in Buffalo New York in 1976..................
Will Dockery
2018-12-18 02:45:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
No, it is a fact, NG... a fact that you have chosen to dispute.
Dental River
2018-12-18 03:19:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
No, it is a fact, NG... a fact that you have chosen to dispute.
Oh my Lord, NancyGene, must you choose to dispute a fact!

I wish folks around here would should show more respect for the facts that Will presents. He works long, long hours at impressing us with the facts, and it's a full time career with him.

Give this hard-working man his ease!
General Zod
2018-12-18 07:35:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dental River
Post by Will Dockery
No, it is a fact, NG... a fact that you have chosen to dispute.
Oh my Lord, NancyGene, must you choose to dispute a fact!
I wish folks around here would should show more respect for the facts that Will presents. He works long, long hours at impressing us with the facts, and it's a full time career with him.
Give this hard-working man his ease!
That was funny................................
NancyGene
2018-12-18 16:41:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dental River
Post by Will Dockery
No, it is a fact, NG... a fact that you have chosen to dispute.
Oh my Lord, NancyGene, must you choose to dispute a fact!
I wish folks around here would should show more respect for the facts that Will presents. He works long, long hours at impressing us with the facts, and it's a full time career with him.
Give this hard-working man his ease!
Our most sincere apologies, DR. What exactly does Will work at? Aren't facts subjective according to him? If he said it, it must be right?
Dental River
2018-12-18 16:54:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by NancyGene
Post by Dental River
Post by Will Dockery
No, it is a fact, NG... a fact that you have chosen to dispute.
Oh my Lord, NancyGene, must you choose to dispute a fact!
I wish folks around here would show more respect for the facts that Will presents. He works long, long hours at impressing us with the facts, and it's a full time career with him.
Give this hard-working man his ease!
Our most sincere apologies, DR. What exactly does Will work at? Aren't facts subjective according to him? If he said it, it must be right?
He works hard at the truth, NG, the truth. It is constructed one brick at a time and will be a magnificent edifice. Each brick will cost one Dockery buck, and upon its completion the truth will be the most valuable institution in the land, that nobody can devalue.
Dental River
2018-12-18 17:14:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by NancyGene
Post by Dental River
Post by Will Dockery
No, it is a fact, NG... a fact that you have chosen to dispute.
Oh my Lord, NancyGene, must you choose to dispute a fact!
I wish folks around here would show more respect for the facts that Will presents. He works long, long hours at impressing us with the facts, and it's a full time career with him.
Give this hard-working man his ease!
Our most sincere apologies, DR. What exactly does Will work at? Aren't facts subjective according to him? If he said it, it must be right?
He works hard at the truth, NG, the truth. It is constructed one brick at a time, and will be a magnificent edifice. Each brick costs one Dockery buck. It will stand outside time, and any other recognizable context, never to be devalued.
NancyGene
2018-12-18 23:34:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Dental River
Post by NancyGene
Post by Dental River
Post by Will Dockery
No, it is a fact, NG... a fact that you have chosen to dispute.
Oh my Lord, NancyGene, must you choose to dispute a fact!
I wish folks around here would show more respect for the facts that Will presents. He works long, long hours at impressing us with the facts, and it's a full time career with him.
Give this hard-working man his ease!
Our most sincere apologies, DR. What exactly does Will work at? Aren't facts subjective according to him? If he said it, it must be right?
He works hard at the truth, NG, the truth. It is constructed one brick at a time,
Rather like him setting the record straight, only he doesn't use a bubble level?
Post by Dental River
and will be a magnificent edifice. Each brick costs one Dockery buck.
Brick shit house? How much is a Dockery Buck actually worth in bit coins?
Post by Dental River
It will stand outside time, and any other recognizable context, never to be devalued.
A Rosetta Stone for all literature for the millennia. We think that only Pickles could understand and write about things outside of time and context, with his "no-thing-ness" and "be-ing" insights.
Will Dockery
2018-12-18 17:34:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by NancyGene
Aren't facts subjective according to him? If he said it, it must be right?
"There is a cure for the Blues
[...]
A white cabbie says there ain't never
been no/great colored poets
[...]
and I think to myself man
this cat is hip/ smooth,
there's truth in his meter,
so I sez to him I say, hey man,
how come a professor like you
is driving a cab?"
-Ahmos Zu-Bolton, fair use excerpt from "Taxicab Blues".
Ahmos Zu-Bolton II (October 21, 1948,[1] Poplarville, Mississippi - March 8,
2005[2]) was an activist, poet and playwright also known for his editing and
publishing endeavors on behalf of African-American culture.
http://pennyspoetry.wikia.com/wiki/Ahmos_Zu-Bolton
HTH & HAND.
General Zod
2018-12-19 08:35:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by NancyGene
Aren't facts subjective according to him? If he said it, it must be right?
"There is a cure for the Blues
[...]
A white cabbie says there ain't never
been no/great colored poets
[...]
and I think to myself man
this cat is hip/ smooth,
there's truth in his meter,
so I sez to him I say, hey man,
how come a professor like you
is driving a cab?"
-Ahmos Zu-Bolton, fair use excerpt from "Taxicab Blues".
Ahmos Zu-Bolton II (October 21, 1948,[1] Poplarville, Mississippi - March 8,
2005[2]) was an activist, poet and playwright also known for his editing and
publishing endeavors on behalf of African-American culture.
http://pennyspoetry.wikia.com/wiki/Ahmos_Zu-Bolton
HTH & HAND.
Interestin conversation...……………...
Will Dockery
2018-12-18 22:49:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Typo alert:

Fact, not face.

😀
Will Dockery
2018-12-18 23:37:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Ahmos Zu-Bolton was here, and I'm sure in not the only student or teacher who remembers him.

😊
General Zod
2018-12-19 00:17:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Ahmos Zu-Bolton was here, and I'm sure in not the only student or teacher who remembers him.
😊
I seen the photo of you and the newspaper and lit mag staff........... sure some of them remember this poet.............
Michael Pendragon
2018-12-19 03:25:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Ahmos Zu-Bolton was here, and I'm sure in not the only student or teacher who remembers him.
Every Halloween night the Great Ahmos would rise out of the pumpkin patch ...

We know.
Bad Bad Leroy Brown
2018-12-23 03:09:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Ahmos Zu-Bolton was here, and I'm sure in not the only student or teacher who remembers him.
😊
No doubt...………………….
Will Dockery
2018-12-20 01:23:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I'll ask around with fellow classmates from Carver, get their memories of Ahmos Zu-Bolton.
General Zod
2018-12-21 08:10:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
I'll ask around with fellow classmates from Carver, get their memories of Ahmos Zu-Bolton.
That would be of interest...………………………...
Bad Bad Leroy Brown
2018-12-21 22:44:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
"There is a cure for the Blues
[...]
A white cabbie says there ain't never
been no/great colored poets
[...]
and I think to myself man
this cat is hip/ smooth,
there's truth in his meter,
so I sez to him I say, hey man,
how come a professor like you
is driving a cab?"
-Ahmos Zu-Bolton, fair use excerpt from "Taxicab Blues".
Ahmos Zu-Bolton II (October 21, 1948,[1] Poplarville, Mississippi - March 8,
2005[2]) was an activist, poet and playwright also known for his editing and
publishing endeavors on behalf of African-American culture.
http://pennyspoetry.wikia.com/wiki/Ahmos_Zu-Bolton
Keep us posted..................
Will Dockery
2018-12-22 19:21:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Bad Bad Leroy Brown
Post by Will Dockery
"There is a cure for the Blues
[...]
A white cabbie says there ain't never
been no/great colored poets
[...]
and I think to myself man
this cat is hip/ smooth,
there's truth in his meter,
so I sez to him I say, hey man,
how come a professor like you
is driving a cab?"
-Ahmos Zu-Bolton, fair use excerpt from "Taxicab Blues".
Ahmos Zu-Bolton II (October 21, 1948,[1] Poplarville, Mississippi - March 8,
2005[2]) was an activist, poet and playwright also known for his editing and
publishing endeavors on behalf of African-American culture.
http://pennyspoetry.wikia.com/wiki/Ahmos_Zu-Bolton
Post by Bad Bad Leroy Brown
Keep us posted..................
I will... should have more information this weekend.
Will Dockery
2018-12-22 21:50:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Thanks again George Dance and General Zod for helping get the correct information on this poet out and archived.

😊
Bad Bad Leroy Brown
2018-12-22 22:47:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Thanks again George Dance and General Zod for helping get the correct information on this poet out and archived.
😊
Always...............
Will Dockery
2018-12-23 02:21:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
That's right, thanks again.
Will Dockery
2018-12-23 18:30:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
For the record, my correct statements on Ahmos Zu-Bolton.
General Zod
2018-12-23 22:21:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
"There is a cure for the Blues
[...]
A white cabbie says there ain't never
been no/great colored poets
[...]
and I think to myself man
this cat is hip/ smooth,
there's truth in his meter,
so I sez to him I say, hey man,
how come a professor like you
is driving a cab?"
-Ahmos Zu-Bolton, fair use excerpt from "Taxicab Blues".
Ahmos Zu-Bolton II (October 21, 1948,[1] Poplarville, Mississippi - March 8,
2005[2]) was an activist, poet and playwright also known for his editing and
publishing endeavors on behalf of African-American culture.
http://pennyspoetry.wikia.com/wiki/Ahmos_Zu-Bolton
Good basic and truthful update.............
Will Dockery
2018-12-23 22:45:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Good find, Zod.
Will Dockery
2018-12-24 06:06:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
It will be even more interesting when I locate the print copies.
Bad Bad Leroy Brown
2018-12-24 22:33:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
"There is a cure for the Blues
[...]
A white cabbie says there ain't never
been no/great colored poets
[...]
and I think to myself man
this cat is hip/ smooth,
there's truth in his meter,
so I sez to him I say, hey man,
how come a professor like you
is driving a cab?"
-Ahmos Zu-Bolton, fair use excerpt from "Taxicab Blues".
Ahmos Zu-Bolton II (October 21, 1948,[1] Poplarville, Mississippi - March 8,
2005[2]) was an activist, poet and playwright also known for his editing and
publishing endeavors on behalf of African-American culture.
http://pennyspoetry.wikia.com/wiki/Ahmos_Zu-Bolton
Interesting yet again...…………..
General Zod
2018-12-27 06:12:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
"There is a cure for the Blues
[...]
A white cabbie says there ain't never
been no/great colored poets
[...]
and I think to myself man
this cat is hip/ smooth,
there's truth in his meter,
so I sez to him I say, hey man,
how come a professor like you
is driving a cab?"
-Ahmos Zu-Bolton, fair use excerpt from "Taxicab Blues".
Ahmos Zu-Bolton II (October 21, 1948,[1] Poplarville, Mississippi - March 8,
2005[2]) was an activist, poet and playwright also known for his editing and
publishing endeavors on behalf of African-American culture.
http://pennyspoetry.wikia.com/wiki/Ahmos_Zu-Bolton
Find that magazine yet Doc?
Will Dockery
2018-12-28 16:47:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by General Zod
Post by Will Dockery
"There is a cure for the Blues
[...]
A white cabbie says there ain't never
been no/great colored poets
[...]
and I think to myself man
this cat is hip/ smooth,
there's truth in his meter,
so I sez to him I say, hey man,
how come a professor like you
is driving a cab?"
-Ahmos Zu-Bolton, fair use excerpt from "Taxicab Blues".
Ahmos Zu-Bolton II (October 21, 1948,[1] Poplarville, Mississippi - March 8,
2005[2]) was an activist, poet and playwright also known for his editing and
publishing endeavors on behalf of African-American culture.
http://pennyspoetry.wikia.com/wiki/Ahmos_Zu-Bolton
Find that magazine yet Doc?
The magazine in question is the 1976 edition of Pegasus, the Carver High School literary magazine.

I do have a copy of that magazine, but haven't had the time yet this holiday season to look for it.
Will Dockery
2018-12-28 11:52:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
The magazine in question is the 1976 edition of Pegasus, the Carver High School literary magazine.

Within it is an introduction by the poet Ahmos Zu-Bolton.
Will Dockery
2018-12-28 19:45:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
In any case he was pretty well spoken for a black man in these parts.
Again, I didn't write this, as I have repeatedly stated, an impostor forging my name and misrepresenting me posted it.

Looking up the IP address of the poster here:

https://groups.google.com/forum/#!original/alt.arts.poetry.comments/PrsKWs0t2Ew/2AMKt9XfBAAJ

Gives an IP address of:

51.38.69.128

Which, looked up on the lookup site gives the forger as using a Proxy Server:

https://whatismyipaddress.com/ip/51.38.69.128

Details for 51.38.69.128
IP: 51.38.69.128
Decimal: 858146176
Hostname: 128.ip-51-38-69.eu
ASN: 16276
ISP: OVH Hosting
Organization: OVH Hosting
Services: Confirmed proxy server
Tor exit node
Recently reported forum spam source. (1997)
Assignment: Static IP

Country: France
State/Region: Occitania
City: Aulus-les-Bains

I did not post the quote the trolls are attributing me with, bottom line.
m***@gmail.com
2018-12-28 19:54:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
In any case he was pretty well spoken for a black man in these parts.
Again, I didn't write this, as I have repeatedly stated, an impostor forging my name and misrepresenting me posted it.
https://groups.google.com/forum/#!original/alt.arts.poetry.comments/PrsKWs0t2Ew/2AMKt9XfBAAJ
51.38.69.128
https://whatismyipaddress.com/ip/51.38.69.128
Details for 51.38.69.128
IP: 51.38.69.128
Decimal: 858146176
Hostname: 128.ip-51-38-69.eu
ASN: 16276
ISP: OVH Hosting
Organization: OVH Hosting
Services: Confirmed proxy server
Tor exit node
Recently reported forum spam source. (1997)
Assignment: Static IP
Country: France
State/Region: Occitania
City: Aulus-les-Bains
I did not post the quote the trolls are attributing me with, bottom line.
Thanks for proving you'd posted it, Will!

[Archived for Posterity.]
General Zod
2018-12-28 22:10:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
In any case he was pretty well spoken for a black man in these parts.
Again, I didn't write this, as I have repeatedly stated, an impostor forging my name and misrepresenting me posted it.
https://groups.google.com/forum/#!original/alt.arts.poetry.comments/PrsKWs0t2Ew/2AMKt9XfBAAJ
51.38.69.128
https://whatismyipaddress.com/ip/51.38.69.128
Details for 51.38.69.128
IP: 51.38.69.128
Decimal: 858146176
Hostname: 128.ip-51-38-69.eu
ASN: 16276
ISP: OVH Hosting
Organization: OVH Hosting
Services: Confirmed proxy server
Tor exit node
Recently reported forum spam source. (1997)
Assignment: Static IP
Country: France
State/Region: Occitania
City: Aulus-les-Bains
I did not post the quote the trolls are attributing me with, bottom line.
It was an obvious impersonation and forgery of thy name Sire...........
Will Dockery
2018-12-28 20:18:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I did not make that post, Pendragon.

An impostor troll forging my name posted it, obviously intended as a malicious misrepresentation of me and my thoughts.

😊
Michael Pendragon
2018-12-28 20:46:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
I did not make that post, Pendragon.
An impostor troll forging my name posted it, obviously intended as a malicious misrepresentation of me and my thoughts.
There have been no forgeries of your signature here, Will.

Nor was the post a forgery. You are obviously lying again to play up the sense of drama.
Will Dockery
2018-12-28 21:03:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
I did not make that post, Pendragon.
An impostor troll forging my name posted it, obviously intended as a malicious misrepresentation of me and my thoughts.
There have been
Correct...
Post by Michael Pendragon
In any case he was
Again, I didn't write this, as I have repeatedly stated, an impostor forging my name and misrepresenting me posted it.

Looking up the IP address of the poster here:

https://groups.google.com/forum/#!original/alt.arts.poetry.comments/PrsKWs0t2Ew/2AMKt9XfBAAJ

Gives an IP address of:

51.38.69.128

Which, looked up on the lookup site gives the forger as using a Proxy Server:

https://whatismyipaddress.com/ip/51.38.69.128

Details for 51.38.69.128
IP: 51.38.69.128
Decimal: 858146176
Hostname: 128.ip-51-38-69.eu
ASN: 16276
ISP: OVH Hosting
Organization: OVH Hosting
Services: Confirmed proxy server
Tor exit node
Recently reported forum spam source. (1997)
Assignment: Static IP

Country: France
State/Region: Occitania
City: Aulus-les-Bains

I did not post the quote the trolls are attributing me with, bottom line.

And so it goes...
Michael Pendragon
2018-12-28 21:15:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
I did not make that post, Pendragon.
An impostor troll forging my name posted it, obviously intended as a malicious misrepresentation of me and my thoughts.
There have been
Correct...
Post by Michael Pendragon
In any case he was
Again, I didn't write this, as I have repeatedly stated, an impostor forging my name and misrepresenting me posted it.
https://groups.google.com/forum/#!original/alt.arts.poetry.comments/PrsKWs0t2Ew/2AMKt9XfBAAJ
51.38.69.128
https://whatismyipaddress.com/ip/51.38.69.128
Details for 51.38.69.128
IP: 51.38.69.128
Decimal: 858146176
Hostname: 128.ip-51-38-69.eu
ASN: 16276
ISP: OVH Hosting
Organization: OVH Hosting
Services: Confirmed proxy server
Tor exit node
Recently reported forum spam source. (1997)
Assignment: Static IP
Country: France
State/Region: Occitania
City: Aulus-les-Bains
I did not post the quote the trolls are attributing me with, bottom line.
And so it goes...
Yes, Will... so it goes.

The "impostor" was using a proxy server that gave a patently phony location in France. It could have been anyone... even (wait for it)... Will Dockery.
ME
2018-12-30 20:37:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
I did not make that post, Pendragon.
An impostor troll forging my name posted it, obviously intended as a malicious misrepresentation of me and my thoughts.
There have been
Correct...
Post by Michael Pendragon
In any case he was
Again, I didn't write this, as I have repeatedly stated, an impostor forging my name and misrepresenting me posted it.
https://groups.google.com/forum/#!original/alt.arts.poetry.comments/PrsKWs0t2Ew/2AMKt9XfBAAJ
51.38.69.128
https://whatismyipaddress.com/ip/51.38.69.128
Details for 51.38.69.128
IP: 51.38.69.128
Decimal: 858146176
Hostname: 128.ip-51-38-69.eu
ASN: 16276
ISP: OVH Hosting
Organization: OVH Hosting
Services: Confirmed proxy server
Tor exit node
Recently reported forum spam source. (1997)
Assignment: Static IP
Country: France
State/Region: Occitania
City: Aulus-les-Bains
I did not post the quote the trolls are attributing me with, bottom line.
And so it goes...
Yes, Will... so it goes.
The "impostor" was using a proxy server that gave a patently phony location in France. It could have been anyone... even (wait for it)... Will Dockery.
Heh, heh......
General Zod
2018-12-29 03:37:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
I did not make that post, Pendragon.
An impostor troll forging my name posted it, obviously intended as a malicious misrepresentation of me and my thoughts.
😊
Excatly……………………….
Will Dockery
2018-12-28 21:20:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
It was an impostor troll using my name to spread malicious misrepresentations, Pendragon.

We agree on this much, correct?
Michael Pendragon
2018-12-28 21:54:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
It was an impostor troll using my name to spread malicious misrepresentations, Pendragon.
We agree on this much, correct?
I'll allow for that possibility, however your posting the proxy server address did not prove a thing.
Will Dockery
2018-12-29 00:47:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Yes, just keeping the record straight, my friends.

:)
Will Dockery
2018-12-29 23:36:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Yes, I have a copy of Pegasus 1976 edition in my archives.
Bad Bad Leroy Brown
2018-12-30 03:36:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Yes, I have a copy of Pegasus 1976 edition in my archives.
Bring it on.............
Will Dockery
2018-12-30 04:32:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I will find it during the holiday.
Will Dockery
2018-12-30 18:07:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by General Zod
Post by Will Dockery
"There is a cure for the Blues
[...]
A white cabbie says there ain't never
been no/great colored poets
[...]
and I think to myself man
this cat is hip/ smooth,
there's truth in his meter,
so I sez to him I say, hey man,
how come a professor like you
is driving a cab?"
-Ahmos Zu-Bolton, fair use excerpt from "Taxicab Blues".
Ahmos Zu-Bolton II (October 21, 1948,[1] Poplarville, Mississippi - March 8,
2005[2]) was an activist, poet and playwright also known for his editing and
publishing endeavors on behalf of African-American culture.
http://pennyspoetry.wikia.com/wiki/Ahmos_Zu-Bolton
Find that magazine yet Doc?
The magazine in question is the 1976 edition of Pegasus, the Carver High School literary magazine.
I do have a copy of that magazine, but haven't had the time yet this holiday season to look for it.
Some or all of the people in these photographs would remember Ahmos Zu-Bolton, the staffs of Pegasus, the literary magazine, and Carverlite, the school newspaper, of which I was a member of both:

Loading Image...

Carver High School 1977 Literary Magazine, Pegasus, and Newspaper, Carverlite, staff, Will Dockery with friends. — at Carver High School.

And so it goes.
Chafetz Chayim ha'Yehu'di
2018-12-30 19:17:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
And so it goes.
Will...FakeJewScarlotti barely made it out of high school. You have nothing to 'prove' to his kind of trash. You have been, for decades, a continually unfolding poet; Scarlotti remains a fraud.

*********************************

STEPHAN PICKERING / חפץ ח"ם בן אברהם
Torah אלילה Yehu'di Apikores / Philologia Kabbalistica Speculativa Researcher
לחיות זמן רב ולשגשג...לעולם לא עוד
THE KABBALAH FRACTALS PROJECT
לעולם לא אשכח

IN PROGRESS: Shabtai Zisel benA v'Rachel Riva:
davening in the musematic dark
General Zod
2018-12-30 22:24:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
Post by General Zod
Post by Will Dockery
"There is a cure for the Blues
[...]
A white cabbie says there ain't never
been no/great colored poets
[...]
and I think to myself man
this cat is hip/ smooth,
there's truth in his meter,
so I sez to him I say, hey man,
how come a professor like you
is driving a cab?"
-Ahmos Zu-Bolton, fair use excerpt from "Taxicab Blues".
Ahmos Zu-Bolton II (October 21, 1948,[1] Poplarville, Mississippi - March 8,
2005[2]) was an activist, poet and playwright also known for his editing and
publishing endeavors on behalf of African-American culture.
http://pennyspoetry.wikia.com/wiki/Ahmos_Zu-Bolton
Find that magazine yet Doc?
The magazine in question is the 1976 edition of Pegasus, the Carver High School literary magazine.
I do have a copy of that magazine, but haven't had the time yet this holiday season to look for it.
https://scontent-atl3-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/33894486_10156602898869363_199133298230820864_n.jpg?_nc_cat=108&_nc_ht=scontent-atl3-1.xx&oh=abd0abb469cf0e707bfa8e4271c61535&oe=5CD7B577
Carver High School 1977 Literary Magazine, Pegasus, and Newspaper, Carverlite, staff, Will Dockery with friends. — at Carver High School.
And so it goes.
Outdamnedstanding.............!
Will Dockery
2018-12-30 20:41:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Hello, Stephen, and yes, Pendragon continues to prove your point for you.
Michael Pendragon
2018-12-31 03:24:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Hello, Stephen, and yes, Pendragon continues to prove your point for you.
What point?

A newspaper article surfaced wherein Pick had told the reporter that he had self-converted to Judaism. I'd noted that self-conversion isn't considered to be a valid form of conversion. Pick promptly IKYABWAI's that I was a "Fake Jew" and a "fraud."

Of course it's plain to see that yours was a self-serving response intended to deflect the negative statements that have been piling up about you and your sock brigade.

Were you not such an utter idiot, you'd realize that your 200 spam posts a day do far more damage to your character than I, or anyone else here, could ever achieve.
Will Dockery
2018-12-31 03:39:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Michael Pendragon
200
Gay lame
Post by Michael Pendragon
posts a day do far more damage to
character
For once we agree, Pendragon.

:)

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