Discussion:
Looking for a poem
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Pennyaline
2012-02-14 02:59:56 UTC
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There is, somewhere out there, a poem from the metaphysical era that
sets the Garden of Eden as a jungle. I am looking for that poem and the
name of its author. Any ideas?
Adam Lynn
2012-02-14 03:23:31 UTC
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Post by Pennyaline
There is, somewhere out there, a poem from the metaphysical era that
sets the Garden of Eden as a jungle. I am looking for that poem and the
name of its author. Any ideas?
I'll write it for you if the price is right.

Adam
Pennyaline
2012-02-14 03:27:21 UTC
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Post by Adam Lynn
Post by Pennyaline
There is, somewhere out there, a poem from the metaphysical era that
sets the Garden of Eden as a jungle. I am looking for that poem and the
name of its author. Any ideas?
I'll write it for you if the price is right.
What I was hoping for is the one that already exists. Now if you're not
going to be serious about this, there'll be no cake!
DoubleV
2012-02-14 03:44:16 UTC
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Post by Pennyaline
Post by Adam Lynn
Post by Pennyaline
There is, somewhere out there, a poem from the metaphysical era that
sets the Garden of Eden as a jungle. I am looking for that poem and
the name of its author. Any ideas?
I'll write it for you if the price is right.
What I was hoping for is the one that already exists. Now if you're not
going to be serious about this, there'll be no cake!
Oh come on, have some Tea.
--
--Vic (;,,; )
Adam Lynn
2012-02-14 09:18:19 UTC
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Post by Pennyaline
Post by Adam Lynn
Post by Pennyaline
There is, somewhere out there, a poem from the metaphysical era that
sets the Garden of Eden as a jungle. I am looking for that poem and the
name of its author. Any ideas?
I'll write it for you if the price is right.
What I was hoping for is the one that already exists. Now if you're not
going to be serious about this, there'll be no cake!
Can you remember one line of the poem?
Give me one line, and I'll spend some time
trying to help you find it, but you've got to
give me the cake first, because I'm hungry,
and it's hard to think.....
Will Dockery
2012-02-14 09:36:15 UTC
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Post by Adam Lynn
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Adam Lynn
Post by Pennyaline
There is, somewhere out there, a poem from the metaphysical era that
sets the Garden of Eden as a jungle. I am looking for that poem and the
name of its author. Any ideas?
I'll write it for you if the price is right.
What I was hoping for is the one that already exists. Now if you're not
going to be serious about this, there'll be no cake!
Can you remember one line of the poem?
Give me one line, and I'll spend some time
trying to help you find it, but you've got to
give me the cake first, because I'm hungry,
and it's hard to think.....
Good move...
Pennyaline
2012-02-14 19:40:21 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Adam Lynn
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Adam Lynn
Post by Pennyaline
There is, somewhere out there, a poem from the metaphysical era that
sets the Garden of Eden as a jungle. I am looking for that poem and the
name of its author. Any ideas?
I'll write it for you if the price is right.
What I was hoping for is the one that already exists. Now if you're not
going to be serious about this, there'll be no cake!
Can you remember one line of the poem?
Give me one line, and I'll spend some time
trying to help you find it, but you've got to
give me the cake first, because I'm hungry,
and it's hard to think.....
Alright then. Here's a little bit of your cake.

There. Better now? Okay. To the best of recollection, it goes some'at
like this:

Here through the seagreen twilight
Slinks the tiger with his jewelled eye
And slick and slim the crafty lynx
Prick eared like satan lurches by



Maybe I need some cake, too.
Will Dockery
2012-02-16 04:05:50 UTC
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Post by Pennyaline
To the best of recollection, it goes some'at
Here through the seagreen twilight
Slinks the tiger with his jewelled eye
And slick and slim the crafty lynx
Prick eared like satan lurches by
Maybe I need some cake, too.
Worth about $20 of cake, apparently:

Interestingly, all I'm getting from searching one of the lines here,
"And slick and slim the crafty lynx..." is this:

http://www.justanswer.com/general/67bst-trying-years-trace-metaphysical-poem.html

I have been trying for some years to trace a metaphysical poem

Customer Question
I have been trying for some years to trace a metaphysical poem
starting
"Here through the seagreen twilight
Slinks the tiger with his jewelled eye
And slick and slim the crafty lynx
Prick eared like satan lurches by"
Can you help me? I do not know the poet

Already Tried:
Google Poetry first line services Ask Jeeves etc

Submitted: 10 days and 14 hours ago.
Category: General
Value: £14
Status: AWAITING CUSTOMER ACTION

Expert: AngelaCM-Mod replied 6 days and 4 hours ago.

Thank you for your patience, your business is very important to us, we
are waiting on the Expert with the right expertise to come online.
Feel free to let us know if you would like us to continue searching
for an Expert or if you would like us to close your question. Thank
you for your understanding!

Customer replied 5 days and 15 hours ago.
Carry on searching
Best wishes
Ros White

Expert: Pennyaline replied 3 days and 12 hours ago.
Was it a standard form poem, or an epic like "The Knight in the
Tiger's Skin"? It wasn't Blake's "The Tiger," was it?

Customer replied 3 days and 9 hours ago.
It was a standard form poem. Blake's poem starts "Tyger Tygre burning
bright, in the forests of the night".
The poem I'm looking for is about the fall of man from the garden of
Eden, which is depicted as a jungle

Expert: Pennyaline replied 3 days and 9 hours ago.
I know "The Tiger" and I'm asking because lots of people misremember
it as something it isn't. That's what I wanted to establish. But
you've given me more to work with. We're from the same era, but I
don't remember ever reading a poem like the one you're looking for at
all...doesn't mean I won't keep looking though!

Expert: Pennyaline replied 1 days and 22 hours ago.
You know, I actually might be onto your poem!
----

Well, as far as the team of experts... we're trying... heh!

--
Music & poetry of Will Dockery & Friends:
http://www.reverbnation.com/willdockery
Hieronymous 707
2012-02-16 11:13:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Pennyaline
To the best of recollection, it goes some'at
Here through the seagreen twilight
Slinks the tiger with his jewelled eye
And slick and slim the crafty lynx
Prick eared like satan lurches by
Maybe I need some cake, too.
Interestingly, all I'm getting from searching one of the lines here,
http://www.justanswer.com/general/67bst-trying-years-trace-metaphysic...
I have been trying for some years to trace a metaphysical poem
Customer Question
I have been trying for some years to trace a metaphysical poem
starting
"Here through the seagreen twilight
Slinks the tiger with his jewelled eye
And slick and slim the crafty lynx
Prick eared like satan lurches by"
Can you help me? I do not know the poet
Google Poetry first line services Ask Jeeves etc
Submitted: 10 days and 14 hours ago.
Category: General
Value: £14
Status: AWAITING CUSTOMER ACTION
Expert:  AngelaCM-Mod replied 6 days and 4 hours ago.
Thank you for your patience, your business is very important to us, we
are waiting on the Expert with the right expertise to come online.
Feel free to let us know if you would like us to continue searching
for an Expert or if you would like us to close your question. Thank
you for your understanding!
Customer replied 5 days and 15 hours ago.
Carry on searching
Best wishes
Ros White
 Expert:  Pennyaline replied 3 days and 12 hours ago.
Was it a standard form poem, or an epic like "The Knight in the
Tiger's Skin"? It wasn't Blake's "The Tiger," was it?
Customer replied 3 days and 9 hours ago.
It was a standard form poem. Blake's poem starts "Tyger Tygre burning
bright, in the forests of the night".
The poem I'm looking for is about the fall of man from the garden of
Eden, which is depicted as a jungle
 Expert:  Pennyaline replied 3 days and 9 hours ago.
I know "The Tiger" and I'm asking because lots of people misremember
it as something it isn't. That's what I wanted to establish. But
you've given me more to work with. We're from the same era, but I
don't remember ever reading a poem like the one you're looking for at
all...doesn't mean I won't keep looking though!
 Expert:  Pennyaline replied 1 days and 22 hours ago.
You know, I actually might be onto your poem!
----
Well, as far as the team of experts... we're trying... heh!
--
Music & poetry of Will Dockery & Friends:http://www.reverbnation.com/willdockery
Speak for yourself. I'm not trying to do anything for this person. I'm
no expert and I don't have anything to prove. 'Oh, looky here what I
found.' lost its charm some time ago, and I've no interest in doing
somebody else's kids homework for free. Pay me and I'll tell you what
I know. I volunteer what I choose to volunteer. Anything else must be
paid for in cash. In God We Trust.
Pennyaline
2012-02-16 13:11:57 UTC
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Post by Hieronymous 707
Speak for yourself. I'm not trying to do anything for this person. I'm
no expert and I don't have anything to prove. 'Oh, looky here what I
found.' lost its charm some time ago, and I've no interest in doing
somebody else's kids homework for free. Pay me and I'll tell you what
I know. I volunteer what I choose to volunteer. Anything else must be
paid for in cash. In God We Trust.
Nobody's homework is being done for them. I'm looking for this poem for
someone, and they'll pay me if it's found (probably).
Hieronymous 707
2012-02-16 13:16:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Hieronymous 707
Speak for yourself. I'm not trying to do anything for this person. I'm
no expert and I don't have anything to prove. 'Oh, looky here what I
found.' lost its charm some time ago, and I've no interest in doing
somebody else's kids homework for free. Pay me and I'll tell you what
I know. I volunteer what I choose to volunteer. Anything else must be
paid for in cash. In God We Trust.
Nobody's homework is being done for them. I'm looking for this poem for
someone, and they'll pay me if it's found (probably).
Okay, okay. Sheesh. I don't know anything. Good luck finding your
poem. I hope you get rich. I can't help you with that. I'm poor. Have
a wonderful day. Again, I hope you find your poem. I'm sorry I
couldn't help any more than I did. Even that wasn't much. I might have
listed the wrong lynx.
Will Dockery
2012-02-16 23:36:01 UTC
Reply
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Post by Pennyaline
Nobody's homework is being done for them. I'm looking for this poem for
someone, and they'll pay me if it's found (probably).
Okay, I found it, "In The Jungle" by Martin Armstrong... do I get a
cut of the pay?

http://books.google.com/books?q=%22the+tiger+with+his+jewelled+eye%22&hl=en&ie=UTF-8

===
http://tinyurl.com/The-Jungle-Martin-Armstrong

The English review, Volume 49‎ - Page 761Language Arts & Disciplines -
1929

In The Jungle By Martin Armstrong
Here through the sea-green twilight slinks The
tiger with his jewelled eye, And sleek and slim the crafty lynx, Prick-
eared,
like Satan, lurches by. The lion, ruffed in kingly gold, Awakes and
stretches ...
===

--
Music & poetry of Will Dockery & Friends:
http://www.reverbnation.com/willdockery
Hieronymous 707
2012-02-16 23:53:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Pennyaline
Nobody's homework is being done for them. I'm looking for this poem for
someone, and they'll pay me if it's found (probably).
Okay, I found it, "In The Jungle" by Martin Armstrong... do I get a
cut of the pay?
LOL. No wonder you're broke.
Will Dockery
2012-02-17 00:12:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Hieronymous 707
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Pennyaline
Nobody's homework is being done for them. I'm looking for this poem for
someone, and they'll pay me if it's found (probably).
Okay, I found it, "In The Jungle" by Martin Armstrong... do I get a
cut of the pay?
LOL. No wonder you're broke.
There was no way I could get paid for finding it, anyhow... Pennyaline
was the "expert" that Just Ask or whatever the site was called picked
to find the poem for pay.

It took me all of thirty seconds to find it, though, kind of strange
the so-called "expert" couldn't find it after weeks of trying... heh.

--
Music & poetry of Will Dockery & Friends:
http://www.reverbnation.com/willdockery
Hieronymous 707
2012-02-17 00:31:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Hieronymous 707
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Pennyaline
Nobody's homework is being done for them. I'm looking for this poem for
someone, and they'll pay me if it's found (probably).
Okay, I found it, "In The Jungle" by Martin Armstrong... do I get a
cut of the pay?
LOL. No wonder you're broke.
There was no way I could get paid for finding it, anyhow... Pennyaline
was the "expert" that Just Ask or whatever the site was called picked
to find the poem for pay.
It took me all of thirty seconds to find it, though, kind of strange
the so-called "expert" couldn't find it after weeks of trying... heh.
--
Music & poetry of Will Dockery & Friends:http://www.reverbnation.com/willdockery
LOL. As long as you believe there is no way you could get paid for
finding it, you're right. There is no way. If you have something
somebody wants, you can sell it for however much they're willing to
pay. You had information that someone wanted. Now you don't. Like
magick, you made its value to you disappear. Learn from this. It
didn't take me half as long to find that poem as it did you, but I'll
be damned if I'm going to just give it away without at least having a
little fun with her first. Let this be a lesson in GET YOU SOME. Now
go out and get you some.
Will Dockery
2012-02-17 01:51:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Hieronymous 707
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Hieronymous 707
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Pennyaline
Nobody's homework is being done for them. I'm looking for this poem for
someone, and they'll pay me if it's found (probably).
Okay, I found it, "In The Jungle" by Martin Armstrong... do I get a
cut of the pay?
LOL. No wonder you're broke.
There was no way I could get paid for finding it, anyhow... Pennyaline
was the "expert" that Just Ask or whatever the site was called picked
to find the poem for pay.
It took me all of thirty seconds to find it, though, kind of strange
the so-called "expert" couldn't find it after weeks of trying... heh.
LOL. As long as you believe there is no way you could get paid for
finding it
I checked the site over pretty closely, and saw no way to enter into
the "discussion" at all.

I just went ahead and posted the answer here (which it seems anyone
could have found after "weeks" of searching, since it took me three
minutes), where the archives will declare me the winner for
generations to come... heh.

--
Music & poetry of Will Dockery & Friends:
http://www.reverbnation.com/willdockery
Hieronymous 707
2012-02-17 02:04:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Hieronymous 707
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Hieronymous 707
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Pennyaline
Nobody's homework is being done for them. I'm looking for this poem for
someone, and they'll pay me if it's found (probably).
Okay, I found it, "In The Jungle" by Martin Armstrong... do I get a
cut of the pay?
LOL. No wonder you're broke.
There was no way I could get paid for finding it, anyhow... Pennyaline
was the "expert" that Just Ask or whatever the site was called picked
to find the poem for pay.
It took me all of thirty seconds to find it, though, kind of strange
the so-called "expert" couldn't find it after weeks of trying... heh.
LOL. As long as you believe there is no way you could get paid for
finding it
I checked the site over pretty closely, and saw no way to enter into
the "discussion" at all.
I just went ahead and posted the answer here (which it seems anyone
could have found after "weeks" of searching, since it took me three
minutes), where the archives will declare me the winner for
generations to come... heh.
Please enjoy your prize and these fine parting gifts. LOL.
Will Dockery
2012-02-17 03:10:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Hieronymous 707
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Hieronymous 707
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Hieronymous 707
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Pennyaline
Nobody's homework is being done for them. I'm looking for this poem for
someone, and they'll pay me if it's found (probably).
Okay, I found it, "In The Jungle" by Martin Armstrong... do I get a
cut of the pay?
LOL. No wonder you're broke.
There was no way I could get paid for finding it, anyhow... Pennyaline
was the "expert" that Just Ask or whatever the site was called picked
to find the poem for pay.
It took me all of thirty seconds to find it, though, kind of strange
the so-called "expert" couldn't find it after weeks of trying... heh.
LOL. As long as you believe there is no way you could get paid for
finding it
I checked the site over pretty closely, and saw no way to enter into
the "discussion" at all.
I just went ahead and posted the answer here (which it seems anyone
could have found after "weeks" of searching, since it took me three
minutes), where the archives will declare me the winner for
generations to come... heh.
Please enjoy your prize and these fine parting gifts. LOL.
Sure will... why not?

--
Music & poetry from Will Dockery & Friends:
http://www.reverbnation.com/willdockery
Pennyaline
2012-02-17 03:10:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
I just went ahead and posted the answer here (which it seems anyone
could have found after "weeks" of searching, since it took me three
minutes), where the archives will declare me the winner for
generations to come... heh.
When did I say I searched for weeks? I never said anything of the kind.
But I hadn't been able to find it so I asked here for help. Good
thinking on my part, I thought. But, oooooohhhhh noooooooo. Somebody had
to act up, and now you've ruined it for everybody.

I hope you're happy.
Will Dockery
2012-02-17 03:15:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Will Dockery
I just went ahead and posted the answer here (which it seems anyone
could have found after "weeks" of searching, since it took me three
minutes), where the archives will declare me the winner for
generations to come... heh.
When did I say I searched for weeks? I never said anything of the kind.
But I hadn't been able to find it so I asked here for help. Good
thinking on my part, I thought. But, oooooohhhhh noooooooo. Somebody had
to act up, and now you've ruined it for everybody.
I hope you're happy.
Well, you got your twenty bucks for "finding" the poem, right,
Pennyaline?

I'd be happy if you give me a mention on the original site as a person
who "assisted" you in finding the Martin Armstrong poem... doesn't
that sound at least fair?

--
Music & poetry from Will Dockery & Friends:
http://www.reverbnation.com/willdockery
Pennyaline
2012-02-17 03:39:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Will Dockery
I just went ahead and posted the answer here (which it seems anyone
could have found after "weeks" of searching, since it took me three
minutes), where the archives will declare me the winner for
generations to come... heh.
When did I say I searched for weeks? I never said anything of the kind.
But I hadn't been able to find it so I asked here for help. Good
thinking on my part, I thought. But, oooooohhhhh noooooooo. Somebody had
to act up, and now you've ruined it for everybody.
I hope you're happy.
Well, you got your twenty bucks for "finding" the poem, right,
Pennyaline?
I'd be happy if you give me a mention on the original site as a person
who "assisted" you in finding the Martin Armstrong poem... doesn't
that sound at least fair?
I shall, instantly.
Will Dockery
2012-02-17 03:45:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Will Dockery
I just went ahead and posted the answer here (which it seems anyone
could have found after "weeks" of searching, since it took me three
minutes), where the archives will declare me the winner for
generations to come... heh.
When did I say I searched for weeks? I never said anything of the kind.
But I hadn't been able to find it so I asked here for help. Good
thinking on my part, I thought. But, oooooohhhhh noooooooo. Somebody had
to act up, and now you've ruined it for everybody.
I hope you're happy.
Well, you got your twenty bucks for "finding" the poem, right,
Pennyaline?
I'd be happy if you give me a mention on the original site as a person
who "assisted" you in finding the Martin Armstrong poem... doesn't
that sound at least fair?
I shall, instantly.
Thanks, and I'll be happy to team up with you again sometime if you
need it... I really enjoy this sort of thing, even more-so when there
are results!

--
Music & poetry from Will Dockery & Friends:
http://www.reverbnation.com/willdockery
Adam Lynn
2012-02-17 10:07:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Will Dockery
I just went ahead and posted the answer here (which it seems anyone
could have found after "weeks" of searching, since it took me three
minutes), where the archives will declare me the winner for
generations to come... heh.
When did I say I searched for weeks? I never said anything of the kind.
But I hadn't been able to find it so I asked here for help. Good
thinking on my part, I thought. But, oooooohhhhh noooooooo. Somebody had
to act up, and now you've ruined it for everybody.
I hope you're happy.
Well, you got your twenty bucks for "finding" the poem, right,
Pennyaline?
I'd be happy if you give me a mention on the original site as a person
who "assisted" you in finding the Martin Armstrong poem... doesn't
that sound at least fair?
I shall, instantly.
Thanks, and I'll be happy to team up with you again sometime if you
need it... I really enjoy this sort of thing, even more-so when there
are results!
--
Music & poetry from Will Dockery & Friends:http://www.reverbnation.com/willdockery
Good work, Will.

-Bob
Hieronymous 707
2012-02-17 10:38:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Adam Lynn
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Will Dockery
I just went ahead and posted the answer here (which it seems anyone
could have found after "weeks" of searching, since it took me three
minutes), where the archives will declare me the winner for
generations to come... heh.
When did I say I searched for weeks? I never said anything of the kind.
But I hadn't been able to find it so I asked here for help. Good
thinking on my part, I thought. But, oooooohhhhh noooooooo. Somebody had
to act up, and now you've ruined it for everybody.
I hope you're happy.
Well, you got your twenty bucks for "finding" the poem, right,
Pennyaline?
I'd be happy if you give me a mention on the original site as a person
who "assisted" you in finding the Martin Armstrong poem... doesn't
that sound at least fair?
I shall, instantly.
Thanks, and I'll be happy to team up with you again sometime if you
need it... I really enjoy this sort of thing, even more-so when there
are results!
--
Music & poetry from Will Dockery & Friends:http://www.reverbnation.com/willdockery
Good work, Will.
-Bob
Bob,

Good to see you finally up and running on LinkedIn and I'm happy to be
your first connection. By the way, Will and George are there too. You
should look them up and connect. I know. I wasn't talking to you,
specifically. You should know that by now.

Anyway, not to sound immodest but my list of connections is in the
thousands. And when I say connections I mean real hardcore fans that
my shit hits. You can just imagine what happens when my shit hits the
fans. All I can say is you better fuck in duck.
Adam Lynn
2012-02-17 10:50:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Hieronymous 707
Post by Adam Lynn
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Will Dockery
I just went ahead and posted the answer here (which it seems anyone
could have found after "weeks" of searching, since it took me three
minutes), where the archives will declare me the winner for
generations to come... heh.
When did I say I searched for weeks? I never said anything of the kind.
But I hadn't been able to find it so I asked here for help. Good
thinking on my part, I thought. But, oooooohhhhh noooooooo. Somebody had
to act up, and now you've ruined it for everybody.
I hope you're happy.
Well, you got your twenty bucks for "finding" the poem, right,
Pennyaline?
I'd be happy if you give me a mention on the original site as a person
who "assisted" you in finding the Martin Armstrong poem... doesn't
that sound at least fair?
I shall, instantly.
Thanks, and I'll be happy to team up with you again sometime if you
need it... I really enjoy this sort of thing, even more-so when there
are results!
--
Music & poetry from Will Dockery & Friends:http://www.reverbnation.com/willdockery
Good work, Will.
-Bob
Bob,
Good to see you finally up and running on LinkedIn and I'm happy to be
your first connection. By the way, Will and George are there too. You
should look them up and connect. I know. I wasn't talking to you,
specifically. You should know that by now.
Anyway, not to sound immodest but my list of connections is in the
thousands. And when I say connections I mean real hardcore fans that
my shit hits. You can just imagine what happens when my shit hits the
fans. All I can say is you better fuck in duck.
Thanks for sending the email.
I'll look Will and George up.
Hieronymous 707
2012-02-17 11:30:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Adam Lynn
Post by Hieronymous 707
Post by Adam Lynn
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Will Dockery
I just went ahead and posted the answer here (which it seems anyone
could have found after "weeks" of searching, since it took me three
minutes), where the archives will declare me the winner for
generations to come... heh.
When did I say I searched for weeks? I never said anything of the kind.
But I hadn't been able to find it so I asked here for help. Good
thinking on my part, I thought. But, oooooohhhhh noooooooo. Somebody had
to act up, and now you've ruined it for everybody.
I hope you're happy.
Well, you got your twenty bucks for "finding" the poem, right,
Pennyaline?
I'd be happy if you give me a mention on the original site as a person
who "assisted" you in finding the Martin Armstrong poem... doesn't
that sound at least fair?
I shall, instantly.
Thanks, and I'll be happy to team up with you again sometime if you
need it... I really enjoy this sort of thing, even more-so when there
are results!
--
Music & poetry from Will Dockery & Friends:http://www.reverbnation.com/willdockery
Good work, Will.
-Bob
Bob,
Good to see you finally up and running on LinkedIn and I'm happy to be
your first connection. By the way, Will and George are there too. You
should look them up and connect. I know. I wasn't talking to you,
specifically. You should know that by now.
Anyway, not to sound immodest but my list of connections is in the
thousands. And when I say connections I mean real hardcore fans that
my shit hits. You can just imagine what happens when my shit hits the
fans. All I can say is you better fuck in duck.
Thanks for sending the email.
I'll look Will and George up.
You're welcome. Do you want to know what I mean when I say I know? Do
you play cards or chess? I ask so that you may draw from the analogy.
I play both well, naturally. Exceptionally well by most standards. So
well that once upon a time I was very politely asked in no uncertain
terms not to ever ever play card games in certain specific large
buildings in certain specific small cities. Truthfully, they asked
several times, and in fact they said they wouldn't ask again. I just
think that's so funny because I never did anything wrong. I just have
this Rainman type thing that goes on in my head so that I simply know
when to maximize my bet. I completely understand their point. They're
there to run a business, not cater to the likes of me. Still, I don't
get what's so wrong with me doing what I do. I mean it's what I do.
It's all in my head. I can't take it out until I'm dead. It's generic
to me. It's who and what I am. The best and worst thing I can ever do
with it share it like this. And of course finance my other frivolous
enterprises. I mean the money has to come from somewhere. Ask Will.
Ask Mike. Ask George. Hell, you can even ask my next door neighbor. My
postal delivery person. My banker and the cops. I'm obviously not
doing anything illegal, but I appear to be doing so well despite so
little effort. A lot of people think I must live online given my post
count. The truth is that I sneak into Atlantic City from time to time
to gamble. I'm not greedy or habitual so I go unnoticed by security. I
take my wife and son to spot for me and we just make a day of it.
There's a cool little diner in Woodstown that we usually stop in for
breakfast on the way there. It's called the Woodstown Diner. Do you
know why? See, that's what I mean when I say I know.
Adam Lynn
2012-02-17 12:53:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Hieronymous 707
Post by Adam Lynn
Post by Hieronymous 707
Post by Adam Lynn
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Will Dockery
I just went ahead and posted the answer here (which it seems anyone
could have found after "weeks" of searching, since it took me three
minutes), where the archives will declare me the winner for
generations to come... heh.
When did I say I searched for weeks? I never said anything of the kind.
But I hadn't been able to find it so I asked here for help. Good
thinking on my part, I thought. But, oooooohhhhh noooooooo. Somebody had
to act up, and now you've ruined it for everybody.
I hope you're happy.
Well, you got your twenty bucks for "finding" the poem, right,
Pennyaline?
I'd be happy if you give me a mention on the original site as a person
who "assisted" you in finding the Martin Armstrong poem... doesn't
that sound at least fair?
I shall, instantly.
Thanks, and I'll be happy to team up with you again sometime if you
need it... I really enjoy this sort of thing, even more-so when there
are results!
--
Music & poetry from Will Dockery & Friends:http://www.reverbnation.com/willdockery
Good work, Will.
-Bob
Bob,
Good to see you finally up and running on LinkedIn and I'm happy to be
your first connection. By the way, Will and George are there too. You
should look them up and connect. I know. I wasn't talking to you,
specifically. You should know that by now.
Anyway, not to sound immodest but my list of connections is in the
thousands. And when I say connections I mean real hardcore fans that
my shit hits. You can just imagine what happens when my shit hits the
fans. All I can say is you better fuck in duck.
Thanks for sending the email.
I'll look Will and George up.
You're welcome. Do you want to know what I mean when I say I know? Do
you play cards or chess? I ask so that you may draw from the analogy.
I play both well, naturally. Exceptionally well by most standards. So
well that once upon a time I was very politely asked in no uncertain
terms not to ever ever play card games in certain specific large
buildings in certain specific small cities. Truthfully, they asked
several times, and in fact they said they wouldn't ask again. I just
think that's so funny because I never did anything wrong. I just have
this Rainman type thing that goes on in my head so that I simply know
when to maximize my bet. I completely understand their point. They're
there to run a business, not cater to the likes of me. Still, I don't
get what's so wrong with me doing what I do. I mean it's what I do.
It's all in my head. I can't take it out until I'm dead. It's generic
to me. It's who and what I am. The best and worst thing I can ever do
with it share it like this. And of course finance my other frivolous
enterprises. I mean the money has to come from somewhere. Ask Will.
Ask Mike. Ask George. Hell, you can even ask my next door neighbor. My
postal delivery person. My banker and the cops. I'm obviously not
doing anything illegal, but I appear to be doing so well despite so
little effort. A lot of people think I must live online given my post
count. The truth is that I sneak into Atlantic City from time to time
to gamble. I'm not greedy or habitual so I go unnoticed by security. I
take my wife and son to spot for me and we just make a day of it.
There's a cool little diner in Woodstown that we usually stop in for
breakfast on the way there. It's called the Woodstown Diner. Do you
know why? See, that's what I mean when I say I know.
I've played a little chess.
You'd beat me in 3 moves
or less.
Hieronymous 707
2012-02-17 13:17:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Adam Lynn
Post by Hieronymous 707
Post by Adam Lynn
Post by Hieronymous 707
Post by Adam Lynn
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Will Dockery
I just went ahead and posted the answer here (which it seems anyone
could have found after "weeks" of searching, since it took me three
minutes), where the archives will declare me the winner for
generations to come... heh.
When did I say I searched for weeks? I never said anything of the kind.
But I hadn't been able to find it so I asked here for help. Good
thinking on my part, I thought. But, oooooohhhhh noooooooo. Somebody had
to act up, and now you've ruined it for everybody.
I hope you're happy.
Well, you got your twenty bucks for "finding" the poem, right,
Pennyaline?
I'd be happy if you give me a mention on the original site as a person
who "assisted" you in finding the Martin Armstrong poem... doesn't
that sound at least fair?
I shall, instantly.
Thanks, and I'll be happy to team up with you again sometime if you
need it... I really enjoy this sort of thing, even more-so when there
are results!
--
Music & poetry from Will Dockery & Friends:http://www.reverbnation.com/willdockery
Good work, Will.
-Bob
Bob,
Good to see you finally up and running on LinkedIn and I'm happy to be
your first connection. By the way, Will and George are there too. You
should look them up and connect. I know. I wasn't talking to you,
specifically. You should know that by now.
Anyway, not to sound immodest but my list of connections is in the
thousands. And when I say connections I mean real hardcore fans that
my shit hits. You can just imagine what happens when my shit hits the
fans. All I can say is you better fuck in duck.
Thanks for sending the email.
I'll look Will and George up.
You're welcome. Do you want to know what I mean when I say I know? Do
you play cards or chess? I ask so that you may draw from the analogy.
I play both well, naturally. Exceptionally well by most standards. So
well that once upon a time I was very politely asked in no uncertain
terms not to ever ever play card games in certain specific large
buildings in certain specific small cities. Truthfully, they asked
several times, and in fact they said they wouldn't ask again. I just
think that's so funny because I never did anything wrong. I just have
this Rainman type thing that goes on in my head so that I simply know
when to maximize my bet. I completely understand their point. They're
there to run a business, not cater to the likes of me. Still, I don't
get what's so wrong with me doing what I do. I mean it's what I do.
It's all in my head. I can't take it out until I'm dead. It's generic
to me. It's who and what I am. The best and worst thing I can ever do
with it share it like this. And of course finance my other frivolous
enterprises. I mean the money has to come from somewhere. Ask Will.
Ask Mike. Ask George. Hell, you can even ask my next door neighbor. My
postal delivery person. My banker and the cops. I'm obviously not
doing anything illegal, but I appear to be doing so well despite so
little effort. A lot of people think I must live online given my post
count. The truth is that I sneak into Atlantic City from time to time
to gamble. I'm not greedy or habitual so I go unnoticed by security. I
take my wife and son to spot for me and we just make a day of it.
There's a cool little diner in Woodstown that we usually stop in for
breakfast on the way there. It's called the Woodstown Diner. Do you
know why? See, that's what I mean when I say I know.
I've played a little chess.
You'd beat me in 3 moves
or less.
A man by the name of Robert W. Madden taught me to play chess before I
reached my teens. He lived across the street, had two daughters named
Mary and Madelyn and was my dad's friend. Robert had habits that were
perceived as odd by some of the other neighbors. Robert was oddly
smart. Not just smart or very smart or even genius as most people
understand the word. Robert was a scientific advisor for the National
Security Agency. This is no bullshit. You can look up his obit on the
web and even go so far as to contact his surviving family to confirm
my story is true. Anyway, he taught me to play. I don't know if he
ever actually qualified as a Grand Master, but I did actually,
directly, personally see him beat them. Them meaning more than one,
suggesting that he was a great player in his own right, and he taught
me. I anchored my high school team for two years before I just up and
quit. Stupid really. I coulda been a contenda.
Adam Lynn
2012-02-17 13:31:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Hieronymous 707
Post by Adam Lynn
Post by Hieronymous 707
Post by Adam Lynn
Post by Hieronymous 707
Post by Adam Lynn
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Will Dockery
I just went ahead and posted the answer here (which it seems anyone
could have found after "weeks" of searching, since it took me three
minutes), where the archives will declare me the winner for
generations to come... heh.
When did I say I searched for weeks? I never said anything of the kind.
But I hadn't been able to find it so I asked here for help. Good
thinking on my part, I thought. But, oooooohhhhh noooooooo. Somebody had
to act up, and now you've ruined it for everybody.
I hope you're happy.
Well, you got your twenty bucks for "finding" the poem, right,
Pennyaline?
I'd be happy if you give me a mention on the original site as a person
who "assisted" you in finding the Martin Armstrong poem... doesn't
that sound at least fair?
I shall, instantly.
Thanks, and I'll be happy to team up with you again sometime if you
need it... I really enjoy this sort of thing, even more-so when there
are results!
--
Music & poetry from Will Dockery & Friends:http://www.reverbnation.com/willdockery
Good work, Will.
-Bob
Bob,
Good to see you finally up and running on LinkedIn and I'm happy to be
your first connection. By the way, Will and George are there too. You
should look them up and connect. I know. I wasn't talking to you,
specifically. You should know that by now.
Anyway, not to sound immodest but my list of connections is in the
thousands. And when I say connections I mean real hardcore fans that
my shit hits. You can just imagine what happens when my shit hits the
fans. All I can say is you better fuck in duck.
Thanks for sending the email.
I'll look Will and George up.
You're welcome. Do you want to know what I mean when I say I know? Do
you play cards or chess? I ask so that you may draw from the analogy.
I play both well, naturally. Exceptionally well by most standards. So
well that once upon a time I was very politely asked in no uncertain
terms not to ever ever play card games in certain specific large
buildings in certain specific small cities. Truthfully, they asked
several times, and in fact they said they wouldn't ask again. I just
think that's so funny because I never did anything wrong. I just have
this Rainman type thing that goes on in my head so that I simply know
when to maximize my bet. I completely understand their point. They're
there to run a business, not cater to the likes of me. Still, I don't
get what's so wrong with me doing what I do. I mean it's what I do.
It's all in my head. I can't take it out until I'm dead. It's generic
to me. It's who and what I am. The best and worst thing I can ever do
with it share it like this. And of course finance my other frivolous
enterprises. I mean the money has to come from somewhere. Ask Will.
Ask Mike. Ask George. Hell, you can even ask my next door neighbor. My
postal delivery person. My banker and the cops. I'm obviously not
doing anything illegal, but I appear to be doing so well despite so
little effort. A lot of people think I must live online given my post
count. The truth is that I sneak into Atlantic City from time to time
to gamble. I'm not greedy or habitual so I go unnoticed by security. I
take my wife and son to spot for me and we just make a day of it.
There's a cool little diner in Woodstown that we usually stop in for
breakfast on the way there. It's called the Woodstown Diner. Do you
know why? See, that's what I mean when I say I know.
I've played a little chess.
You'd beat me in 3 moves
or less.
A man by the name of Robert W. Madden taught me to play chess before I
reached my teens. He lived across the street, had two daughters named
Mary and Madelyn and was my dad's friend. Robert had habits that were
perceived as odd by some of the other neighbors. Robert was oddly
smart. Not just smart or very smart or even genius as most people
understand the word. Robert was a scientific advisor for the National
Security Agency. This is no bullshit. You can look up his obit on the
web and even go so far as to contact his surviving family to confirm
my story is true. Anyway, he taught me to play. I don't know if he
ever actually qualified as a Grand Master, but I did actually,
directly, personally see him beat them. Them meaning more than one,
suggesting that he was a great player in his own right, and he taught
me. I anchored my high school team for two years before I just up and
quit. Stupid really. I coulda been a contenda.
What I learned I learned from a taxi driver
who was the dispatcher at the Alb. Airport.
The guy never finished even elementary
school, but he had a big brain. He was a
walking GPS...didn't need any maps, he
had 'em in his head.
George Dance
2012-02-17 11:27:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Will Dockery
I just went ahead and posted the answer here (which it seems anyone
could have found after "weeks" of searching, since it took me three
minutes), where the archives will declare me the winner for
generations to come... heh.
When did I say I searched for weeks? I never said anything of the kind.
But I hadn't been able to find it so I asked here for help. Good
thinking on my part, I thought. But, oooooohhhhh noooooooo. Somebody had
to act up, and now you've ruined it for everybody.
I hope you're happy.
Well, you got your twenty bucks for "finding" the poem, right,
Pennyaline?
I'd be happy if you give me a mention on the original site as a person
who "assisted" you in finding the Martin Armstrong poem... doesn't
that sound at least fair?
I shall, instantly.
Thanks, and I'll be happy to team up with you again sometime if you
need it... I really enjoy this sort of thing, even more-so when there
are results!
--
Music & poetry from Will Dockery & Friends:http://www.reverbnation.com/willdockery
Great detective work, Mr. Dockery. It's rather ironic that you found
it on Google, and not in a book, eh, wot?
Will Dockery
2012-02-17 18:49:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by George Dance
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Will Dockery
I just went ahead and posted the answer here (which it seems anyone
could have found after "weeks" of searching, since it took me three
minutes), where the archives will declare me the winner for
generations to come... heh.
When did I say I searched for weeks? I never said anything of the kind.
But I hadn't been able to find it so I asked here for help. Good
thinking on my part, I thought. But, oooooohhhhh noooooooo. Somebody had
to act up, and now you've ruined it for everybody.
I hope you're happy.
Well, you got your twenty bucks for "finding" the poem, right,
Pennyaline?
I'd be happy if you give me a mention on the original site as a person
who "assisted" you in finding the Martin Armstrong poem... doesn't
that sound at least fair?
I shall, instantly.
Thanks, and I'll be happy to team up with you again sometime if you
need it... I really enjoy this sort of thing, even more-so when there
are results!
Great detective work, Mr. Dockery. It's rather ironic that you found
it on Google, and not in a book, eh, wot?
Don't give away my secrets, George... heh.

In the end-up, I'm glad that Ros White can finally enjoy "In The
Garden" by Martin Armstrong... after waiting about 34 years!

http://www.justanswer.com/general/67bst-trying-years-trace-metaphysical-poem.html

"...Customer replied 10 days and 1 hours ago.
I've been searching for this poem for years (since I was 20, I'm now
54) so waiting a while longer is no problem. It was originally in a
school anthology of poems that I had when I was 16.
Best wishes
Ros White..."

Who knows, maybe Ros White will find her way here, eventually...

Hello, Ros!

--
Music & poetry of Will Dockery & Friends:
http://www.reverbnation.com/willdockery
Will Dockery
2012-02-17 15:58:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Will Dockery
I just went ahead and posted the answer here (which it seems anyone
could have found after "weeks" of searching, since it took me three
minutes), where the archives will declare me the winner for
generations to come... heh.
When did I say I searched for weeks? I never said anything of the kind.
But I hadn't been able to find it so I asked here for help. Good
thinking on my part, I thought. But, oooooohhhhh noooooooo. Somebody had
to act up, and now you've ruined it for everybody.
I hope you're happy.
Well, you got your twenty bucks for "finding" the poem, right,
Pennyaline?
I'd be happy if you give me a mention on the original site as a person
who "assisted" you in finding the Martin Armstrong poem... doesn't
that sound at least fair?
I shall, instantly.
Did you?

At the site, all that shows from your post of "12 hours ago" is:

===

http://www.justanswer.com/general/67bst-trying-years-trace-metaphysical-poem.html

Expert: Pennyaline replied 12 hours ago.
THIS ANSWER IS LOCKED!

You need to spend $3 to view this post. Add Funds to your account and
buy credits.

===

From the rest of the thread nothing is "locked", so why is the section
where you supposedly credit me with providing the Martin Armstrong
information "LOCKED"?

Hopefully you'll be fixing this in some way, soon, where credit to me
is shown, if not the actual answer?

Perhaps you could edit the earlier posts where you imply that you were
making progress in identifying "In The Jungle":

===
Expert: Pennyaline replied 3 days and 10 hours ago.
You know, I actually might be onto your poem!

Customer replied 3 days and 8 hours ago.
Brilliant
===

Anyway, this should be easy for you to fix...

--
Music & poetry of Will Dockery & Friends:
http://www.reverbnation.com/willdockery
Hieronymous 707
2012-02-17 16:17:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Will Dockery
I just went ahead and posted the answer here (which it seems anyone
could have found after "weeks" of searching, since it took me three
minutes), where the archives will declare me the winner for
generations to come... heh.
When did I say I searched for weeks? I never said anything of the kind.
But I hadn't been able to find it so I asked here for help. Good
thinking on my part, I thought. But, oooooohhhhh noooooooo. Somebody had
to act up, and now you've ruined it for everybody.
I hope you're happy.
Well, you got your twenty bucks for "finding" the poem, right,
Pennyaline?
I'd be happy if you give me a mention on the original site as a person
who "assisted" you in finding the Martin Armstrong poem... doesn't
that sound at least fair?
I shall, instantly.
Did you?
===
http://www.justanswer.com/general/67bst-trying-years-trace-metaphysic...
Expert:  Pennyaline replied 12 hours ago.
THIS ANSWER IS LOCKED!
You need to spend $3 to view this post. Add Funds to your account and
buy credits.
===
From the rest of the thread nothing is "locked", so why is the section
where you supposedly credit me with providing the Martin Armstrong
information "LOCKED"?
Hopefully you'll be fixing this in some way, soon, where credit to me
is shown, if not the actual answer?
Perhaps you could edit the earlier posts where you imply that you were
===
Expert:  Pennyaline replied 3 days and 10 hours ago.
You know, I actually might be onto your poem!
Customer replied 3 days and 8 hours ago.
Brilliant
===
Anyway, this should be easy for you to fix...
--
Music & poetry of Will Dockery & Friends:http://www.reverbnation.com/willdockery- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
Will, the answer is locked to keep the information valuable should
anyone else want to buy it in the future. Who knows, somebody else
might come along with the same question and Penny can double, triple
etc. her money. Whoever buys the answer will see your name credited.
Pennyaline
2012-02-17 17:41:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Will Dockery
I'd be happy if you give me a mention on the original site as a person
who "assisted" you in finding the Martin Armstrong poem... doesn't
that sound at least fair?
I shall, instantly.
Did you?
Yes, I did. From the question thread:


Answer
EditSubmit this Q&A as an Expert Test Question
2/16/2012 at 8:22 PM (1 day and 15 hours later)
The poet is Martin Armstrong, and the poem is In The Jungle.

http://books.google.com/books?q=%22the+tiger+with+his+jewelled+eye%22&hl=en&ie=UTF-8

The link goes to a poetry anthology. From there, it's up to you! Wink


(Many thanks to Will Dockery at alt.arts.poetry.comments for his assistance)
Post by Will Dockery
Anyway, this should be easy for you to fix...
What should be?
Will Dockery
2012-02-17 17:57:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
I'd be "happy" if you give me a mention on the original site as a person
Post by Will Dockery
who "assisted" you in finding the Martin Armstrong poem... doesn't
that sound at least fair?
I shall, instantly.
Did you?
Answer
EditSubmit this Q&A as an Expert Test Question
2/16/2012 at 8:22 PM (1 day and 15 hours later)
The poet is Martin Armstrong, and the poem is In The Jungle.
http://books.google.com/books?q=%22the+tiger+with+his+jewelled+eye%22...
The link goes to a poetry anthology. From there, it's up to you! Wink
(Many thanks to Will Dockery at alt.arts.poetry.comments for his assistance)
Post by Will Dockery
Anyway, this should be easy for you to fix...
What should be?
The fact that for the general public, the only "answer" they can see
there on the queation thread is that the answer, including credit to
me, us "Locked":

===

http://www.justanswer.com/general/67bst-trying-years-trace-metaphysical-poem.html

Expert: Pennyaline replied 12 hours ago.
THIS ANSWER IS LOCKED!

You need to spend $3 to view this post. Add Funds to your account and
buy credits.

===

Which was why I wrote:

From the rest of the thread nothing is "locked", so why is the section
where you supposedly credit me with providing the Martin Armstrong
information "LOCKED"?

Hopefully you'll be fixing this in some way, soon, where credit to me
is shown, if not the actual answer?

Which was why I proposed this possible solution:

Perhaps you could edit the earlier posts where you imply that you were
making progress in identifying "In The Jungle":

--
Music & poetry of Will Dockery & Friends:
http://www.reverbnation.com/willdockery
Pennyaline
2012-02-17 18:16:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Will Dockery
Anyway, this should be easy for you to fix...
What should be?
The fact that for the general public, the only "answer" they can see
there on the queation thread is that the answer, including credit to
===
http://www.justanswer.com/general/67bst-trying-years-trace-metaphysical-poem.html
Expert: Pennyaline replied 12 hours ago.
THIS ANSWER IS LOCKED!
You need to spend $3 to view this post. Add Funds to your account and
buy credits.
===
From the rest of the thread nothing is "locked", so why is the section
where you supposedly credit me with providing the Martin Armstrong
information "LOCKED"?
Hopefully you'll be fixing this in some way, soon, where credit to me
is shown, if not the actual answer?
Perhaps you could edit the earlier posts where you imply that you were
I did a copy and paste of the answer from the site, in which you and
this forum are credited. Unfortunately, there are many conditions here
that are not under my control. The answer is not locked at my request. I
can't "fix" that the site requires payment. There is also no option to
edit past entries. The customer and other paying users will see the same
attribution I copied and pasted above.
Will Dockery
2012-02-17 18:37:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
Anyway, this should be easy for you to fix...
What should be?
The fact that for the general public, the only "answer" they can see
there on the queation thread is that the answer, including credit to
===
http://www.justanswer.com/general/67bst-trying-years-trace-metaphysic...
Expert:  Pennyaline replied 12 hours ago.
THIS ANSWER IS LOCKED!
You need to spend $3 to view this post. Add Funds to your account and
buy credits.
===
 From the rest of the thread nothing is "locked", so why is the section
where you supposedly credit me with providing the Martin Armstrong
information "LOCKED"?
Hopefully you'll be fixing this in some way, soon, where credit to me
is shown, if not the actual answer?
Perhaps you could edit the earlier posts where you imply that you were
I did a copy and paste of the answer from the site, in which you and
this forum are credited. Unfortunately, there are many conditions here
that are not under my control. The answer is not locked at my request. I
can't "fix" that the site requires payment. There is also no option to
edit past entries. The customer and other paying users will see the same
attribution I copied and pasted above.
Well, on a good note I guess that makes it easier for the Just Answer
folks to pay us our 14 Pounds/20 dollars, since they'll apparently be
charging an additional $3 a pop for the answer from now on...

Of course, now that this thread exists in the search engines, anyone
asking questions about the Metaphysical poets, and in particular
Martin Armstrong's poem:

I have been trying for some years to trace a metaphysical poem
starting
"Here through the seagreen twilight
Slinks the tiger with his jewelled eye
And slick and slim the crafty lynx
Prick eared like satan lurches by"

Will be (if they know the basics of using Google Search options)
Post by Pennyaline
Answer
EditSubmit this Q&A as an Expert Test Question
2/16/2012 at 8:22 PM (1 day and 15 hours later)
The poet is Martin Armstrong, and the poem is In The Jungle.
http://books.google.com/books?q=%22the+tiger+with+his+jewelled+eye%22...
The link goes to a poetry anthology. From there, it's up to you! Wink
(Many thanks to Will Dockery at alt.arts.poetry.comments for his assistance)
Thanks, glad to help... hopefuly there will be more interesting poetry
questions, this is an enjoyable little game, in my opinion.

--
Music & poetry of Will Dockery & Friends:
http://www.reverbnation.com/willdockery
George Dance
2012-02-17 10:53:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Will Dockery
I just went ahead and posted the answer here (which it seems anyone
could have found after "weeks" of searching, since it took me three
minutes), where the archives will declare me the winner for
generations to come... heh.
When did I say I searched for weeks? I never said anything of the kind.
But I hadn't been able to find it so I asked here for help. Good
thinking on my part, I thought. But, oooooohhhhh noooooooo. Somebody had
to act up, and now you've ruined it for everybody.
I hope you're happy.
How did he "ruin" it? We now all have new knowledge, which should be
better for all -- in particular for those who were asking about it.
Will Dockery
2012-02-17 15:23:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by George Dance
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Will Dockery
I just went ahead and posted the answer here (which it seems anyone
could have found after "weeks" of searching, since it took me three
minutes), where the archives will declare me the winner for
generations to come... heh.
When did I say I searched for weeks? I never said anything of the kind.
But I hadn't been able to find it so I asked here for help. Good
thinking on my part, I thought. But, oooooohhhhh noooooooo. Somebody had
to act up, and now you've ruined it for everybody.
I hope you're happy.
How did he "ruin" it? We now all have new knowledge, which should be
better for all -- in particular for those who were asking about it.
I wasn't sure how to take that, myself... but to shift the subject
just slightly to the actual poem anf Martin Armstrong, the poet...

Is Martin Armstrong on your Poetry Wiki already?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martin_Armstrong_(writer)

Martin Donisthorpe Armstrong (* 2 October 1882 - † 24 February 1974)
was an English writer and poet, known for his stories. He was born in
Newcastle-upon-Tyne, and educated at Charterhouse and Pembroke
College, Cambridge. He served in World War I in the British Army in
France - a Private in the Artists' Rifles, he was commissioned into
the Middlesex Regiment in 1915 and promoted Lieutenant in 1916. He was
included in the final Georgian Poetry anthology.

He married in 1929 Canadian writer Jessie McDonald after she had
divorced Conrad Aiken, making Armstrong the stepfather of the young
Joan Aiken. He appears in disguised form as a character in Conrad
Aiken's Ushant.

[edit] Works
Exodus (1912) poems
Thirty New Poems (1918)
Lady Hester Stanhope (1920) biography
The Buzzards and Other Poems (1921)
The Puppet Show (1922) stories
Jeremy Taylor, A selection from his works (1923) editor
The Foster-Mother (n.d.)
The Bazaar and Other Stories (1924)
The Goat and Compasses (1925) novel
Desert, a Legend (1926) novel
The Stepson (1927) novel
Sir Pompey and Madame Juno (1927) stories
Saint Hercules and Other Stories (1927) Paul Nash illustrations
St. Christopher's Day (1928) novel
Portrait of the Misses Harlowe (1928) story
The Three-Cornered Hat (1928) translation
Laughing (1928) essay
The Sleeping Fury (1929) novel
The Bird-catcher and other poems (1929)
The Fiery Dive and Other Stories (1929)
Adrian Glynde, A Novel (1930)
Collected Poems (1931)
Blind Man's Mark (1931)
The Paintbox, "How and Why" Series (1931)
The Romantic Adventures of Mr. Darby and of Sarah his Wife (1931)
novel
The Fothergill Omnibus (1931) anthology
Lover's Leap (1932)
Fifty-four Conceits: A Collection of Epigrams and Epitaphs Serious
and Comic (1933)
General Buntop's Miracle and Other Stories (1934)
Venus Over Lannery (1936) novel
A Case of Conscience and Other Tales (1937)
Spanish Circus: Charles IV of Spain (1937)
Victorian Peepshow (1938) autobiography
The Major Pleasures of Life, An Anthology (1943)
Chichester Concert (1944) ode

--
Music & poetry of Will Dockery & Friends:
http://www.reverbnation.com/willdockery
Pennyaline
2012-02-17 17:36:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by George Dance
How did he "ruin" it? We now all have new knowledge, which should be
better for all -- in particular for those who were asking about it.
I wasn't sure how to take that, myself...
I gave you guys too much credit. I figured you'd have something of a
sense of humor.
Hieronymous 707
2012-02-17 20:20:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Will Dockery
Post by George Dance
How did he "ruin" it? We now all have new knowledge, which should be
better for all -- in particular for those who were asking about it.
I wasn't sure how to take that, myself...
I gave you guys too much credit. I figured you'd have something of a
sense of humor.
You assumed without adequate basis for doing so. That's because you're
basically very stupid. We are completely humorless fucks here.
Everybody knows that. Now maybe it'll finally get through your silly
head. Go away. Don't come back until you're ready to be really serious.
Will Dockery
2012-02-17 21:19:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pennyaline
Post by George Dance
How did he "ruin" it? We now all have new knowledge, which should be
Post by George Dance
better for all -- in particular for those who were asking about it.
I wasn't sure how to take that, myself...
I gave you guys too much credit. I figured you'd have something of a
sense of humor.
We do, but the jokes have to be funny...

--
Music & poetry of Will Dockery & Friends:
http://www.reverbnation.com/willdockery
George Dance
2012-02-17 23:50:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by George Dance
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Will Dockery
I just went ahead and posted the answer here (which it seems anyone
could have found after "weeks" of searching, since it took me three
minutes), where the archives will declare me the winner for
generations to come... heh.
When did I say I searched for weeks? I never said anything of the kind.
But I hadn't been able to find it so I asked here for help. Good
thinking on my part, I thought. But, oooooohhhhh noooooooo. Somebody had
to act up, and now you've ruined it for everybody.
I hope you're happy.
How did he "ruin" it? We now all have new knowledge, which should be
better for all -- in particular for those who were asking about it.
I wasn't sure how to take that, myself... but to shift the subject
just slightly to the actual poem anf Martin Armstrong, the poet...
Is Martin Armstrong on your Poetry Wiki already?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martin_Armstrong_(writer)
Martin Donisthorpe Armstrong (* 2 October 1882 - † 24 February 1974)
was an English writer and poet, known for his stories. He was born in
Newcastle-upon-Tyne, and educated at Charterhouse and Pembroke
College, Cambridge. He served in World War I in the British Army in
France - a Private in the Artists' Rifles, he was commissioned into
the Middlesex Regiment in 1915 and promoted Lieutenant in 1916. He was
included in the final Georgian Poetry anthology.
He married in 1929 Canadian writer Jessie McDonald after she had
divorced Conrad Aiken, making Armstrong the stepfather of the young
Joan Aiken. He appears in disguised form as a character in Conrad
Aiken's Ushant.
[edit] Works
 Exodus (1912) poems
 Thirty New Poems (1918)
 Lady Hester Stanhope (1920) biography
 The Buzzards and Other Poems (1921)
 The Puppet Show (1922) stories
 Jeremy Taylor, A selection from his works (1923) editor
 The Foster-Mother (n.d.)
 The Bazaar and Other Stories (1924)
 The Goat and Compasses (1925) novel
 Desert, a Legend (1926) novel
 The Stepson (1927) novel
 Sir Pompey and Madame Juno (1927) stories
 Saint Hercules and Other Stories (1927) Paul Nash illustrations
 St. Christopher's Day (1928) novel
 Portrait of the Misses Harlowe (1928) story
 The Three-Cornered Hat (1928) translation
 Laughing (1928) essay
 The Sleeping Fury (1929) novel
 The Bird-catcher and other poems (1929)
 The Fiery Dive and Other Stories (1929)
 Adrian Glynde, A Novel (1930)
 Collected Poems (1931)
 Blind Man's Mark (1931)
 The Paintbox, "How and Why" Series (1931)
 The Romantic Adventures of Mr. Darby and of Sarah his Wife (1931)
novel
 The Fothergill Omnibus (1931) anthology
 Lover's Leap (1932)
 Fifty-four Conceits: A Collection of Epigrams and Epitaphs Serious
and Comic (1933)
 General Buntop's Miracle and Other Stories (1934)
 Venus Over Lannery (1936) novel
 A Case of Conscience and Other Tales (1937)
 Spanish Circus: Charles IV of Spain (1937)
 Victorian Peepshow (1938) autobiography
 The Major Pleasures of Life, An Anthology (1943)
 Chichester Concert (1944) ode
--
Music & poetry of Will Dockery & Friends:http://www.reverbnation.com/willdockery
Yes, he's on (as Martin Armstrong (poet)). Of course, the PPP article
is a bit better than the Wikipedia article, since it starts with the
Wikipedia article and adds some extra features: links to 9 of his
poems online (not "In the Jungle", alas; not yet anyway), a couple of
cited quotes from the /Dictionary of Literary Biography/, and (best of
all) a picture courtesy of you-know-who.
Will Dockery
2012-02-24 21:27:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by George Dance
Post by Will Dockery
Post by George Dance
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Will Dockery
I just went ahead and posted the answer here (which it seems anyone
could have found after "weeks" of searching, since it took me three
minutes), where the archives will declare me the winner for
generations to come... heh.
When did I say I searched for weeks? I never said anything of the kind.
But I hadn't been able to find it so I asked here for help. Good
thinking on my part, I thought. But, oooooohhhhh noooooooo. Somebody had
to act up, and now you've ruined it for everybody.
I hope you're happy.
How did he "ruin" it? We now all have new knowledge, which should be
better for all -- in particular for those who were asking about it.
I wasn't sure how to take that, myself... but to shift the subject
just slightly to the actual poem anf Martin Armstrong, the poet...
Is Martin Armstrong on your Poetry Wiki already?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martin_Armstrong_(writer)
Martin Donisthorpe Armstrong (* 2 October 1882 - † 24 February 1974)
was an English writer and poet, known for his stories. He was born in
Newcastle-upon-Tyne, and educated at Charterhouse and Pembroke
College, Cambridge. He served in World War I in the British Army in
France - a Private in the Artists' Rifles, he was commissioned into
the Middlesex Regiment in 1915 and promoted Lieutenant in 1916. He was
included in the final Georgian Poetry anthology.
He married in 1929 Canadian writer Jessie McDonald after she had
divorced Conrad Aiken, making Armstrong the stepfather of the young
Joan Aiken. He appears in disguised form as a character in Conrad
Aiken's Ushant.
[edit] Works
 Exodus (1912) poems
 Thirty New Poems (1918)
 Lady Hester Stanhope (1920) biography
 The Buzzards and Other Poems (1921)
 The Puppet Show (1922) stories
 Jeremy Taylor, A selection from his works (1923) editor
 The Foster-Mother (n.d.)
 The Bazaar and Other Stories (1924)
 The Goat and Compasses (1925) novel
 Desert, a Legend (1926) novel
 The Stepson (1927) novel
 Sir Pompey and Madame Juno (1927) stories
 Saint Hercules and Other Stories (1927) Paul Nash illustrations
 St. Christopher's Day (1928) novel
 Portrait of the Misses Harlowe (1928) story
 The Three-Cornered Hat (1928) translation
 Laughing (1928) essay
 The Sleeping Fury (1929) novel
 The Bird-catcher and other poems (1929)
 The Fiery Dive and Other Stories (1929)
 Adrian Glynde, A Novel (1930)
 Collected Poems (1931)
 Blind Man's Mark (1931)
 The Paintbox, "How and Why" Series (1931)
 The Romantic Adventures of Mr. Darby and of Sarah his Wife (1931)
novel
 The Fothergill Omnibus (1931) anthology
 Lover's Leap (1932)
 Fifty-four Conceits: A Collection of Epigrams and Epitaphs Serious
and Comic (1933)
 General Buntop's Miracle and Other Stories (1934)
 Venus Over Lannery (1936) novel
 A Case of Conscience and Other Tales (1937)
 Spanish Circus: Charles IV of Spain (1937)
 Victorian Peepshow (1938) autobiography
 The Major Pleasures of Life, An Anthology (1943)
 Chichester Concert (1944) ode
--
http://www.reverbnation.com/willdockery
Post by George Dance
Yes, he's on (as Martin Armstrong (poet)). Of course, the PPP article
is a bit better than the Wikipedia article, since it starts with the
Wikipedia article and adds some extra features: links to 9 of his
poems online (not "In the Jungle", alas; not yet anyway), a couple of
cited quotes from the /Dictionary of Literary Biography/, and (best of
all) a picture courtesy of you-know-who.
Fun stuff, indeed...
George Dance
2012-02-24 23:03:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by George Dance
Post by Will Dockery
Post by George Dance
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Will Dockery
I just went ahead and posted the answer here (which it seems anyone
could have found after "weeks" of searching, since it took me three
minutes), where the archives will declare me the winner for
generations to come... heh.
When did I say I searched for weeks? I never said anything of the kind.
But I hadn't been able to find it so I asked here for help. Good
thinking on my part, I thought. But, oooooohhhhh noooooooo. Somebody had
to act up, and now you've ruined it for everybody.
I hope you're happy.
How did he "ruin" it? We now all have new knowledge, which should be
better for all -- in particular for those who were asking about it.
I wasn't sure how to take that, myself... but to shift the subject
just slightly to the actual poem anf Martin Armstrong, the poet...
Is Martin Armstrong on your Poetry Wiki already?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martin_Armstrong_(writer)
Martin Donisthorpe Armstrong (* 2 October 1882 - † 24 February 1974)
was an English writer and poet, known for his stories. He was born in
Newcastle-upon-Tyne, and educated at Charterhouse and Pembroke
College, Cambridge. He served in World War I in the British Army in
France - a Private in the Artists' Rifles, he was commissioned into
the Middlesex Regiment in 1915 and promoted Lieutenant in 1916. He was
included in the final Georgian Poetry anthology.
He married in 1929 Canadian writer Jessie McDonald after she had
divorced Conrad Aiken, making Armstrong the stepfather of the young
Joan Aiken. He appears in disguised form as a character in Conrad
Aiken's Ushant.
[edit] Works
 Exodus (1912) poems
 Thirty New Poems (1918)
 Lady Hester Stanhope (1920) biography
 The Buzzards and Other Poems (1921)
 The Puppet Show (1922) stories
 Jeremy Taylor, A selection from his works (1923) editor
 The Foster-Mother (n.d.)
 The Bazaar and Other Stories (1924)
 The Goat and Compasses (1925) novel
 Desert, a Legend (1926) novel
 The Stepson (1927) novel
 Sir Pompey and Madame Juno (1927) stories
 Saint Hercules and Other Stories (1927) Paul Nash illustrations
 St. Christopher's Day (1928) novel
 Portrait of the Misses Harlowe (1928) story
 The Three-Cornered Hat (1928) translation
 Laughing (1928) essay
 The Sleeping Fury (1929) novel
 The Bird-catcher and other poems (1929)
 The Fiery Dive and Other Stories (1929)
 Adrian Glynde, A Novel (1930)
 Collected Poems (1931)
 Blind Man's Mark (1931)
 The Paintbox, "How and Why" Series (1931)
 The Romantic Adventures of Mr. Darby and of Sarah his Wife (1931)
novel
 The Fothergill Omnibus (1931) anthology
 Lover's Leap (1932)
 Fifty-four Conceits: A Collection of Epigrams and Epitaphs Serious
and Comic (1933)
 General Buntop's Miracle and Other Stories (1934)
 Venus Over Lannery (1936) novel
 A Case of Conscience and Other Tales (1937)
 Spanish Circus: Charles IV of Spain (1937)
 Victorian Peepshow (1938) autobiography
 The Major Pleasures of Life, An Anthology (1943)
 Chichester Concert (1944) ode
Yes, he's on (as Martin Armstrong (poet)). Of course, the PPP article
is a bit better than the Wikipedia article, since it starts with the
Wikipedia article and adds some extra features: links to 9 of his
poems online (not "In the Jungle", alas; not yet anyway), a couple of
cited quotes from the /Dictionary of Literary Biography/, and (best of
all) a picture courtesy of you-know-who.
Fun stuff, indeed...
Oh, yeah, I guess I should give the link:

http://pennyspoetry.wikia.com/wiki/Martin_Armstrong_(poet)
Post by Will Dockery
Post by George Dance
Post by Will Dockery
--
http://www.reverbnation.com/willdockery
--
http://www.reverbnation.com/willdockery
Will Dockery
2012-02-25 00:03:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by George Dance
Post by Will Dockery
Post by George Dance
Post by Will Dockery
Post by George Dance
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Will Dockery
I just went ahead and posted the answer here (which it seems anyone
could have found after "weeks" of searching, since it took me three
minutes), where the archives will declare me the winner for
generations to come... heh.
When did I say I searched for weeks? I never said anything of the kind.
But I hadn't been able to find it so I asked here for help. Good
thinking on my part, I thought. But, oooooohhhhh noooooooo. Somebody had
to act up, and now you've ruined it for everybody.
I hope you're happy.
How did he "ruin" it? We now all have new knowledge, which should be
better for all -- in particular for those who were asking about it.
I wasn't sure how to take that, myself... but to shift the subject
just slightly to the actual poem anf Martin Armstrong, the poet...
Is Martin Armstrong on your Poetry Wiki already?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martin_Armstrong_(writer)
Martin Donisthorpe Armstrong (* 2 October 1882 - † 24 February 1974)
was an English writer and poet, known for his stories. He was born in
Newcastle-upon-Tyne, and educated at Charterhouse and Pembroke
College, Cambridge. He served in World War I in the British Army in
France - a Private in the Artists' Rifles, he was commissioned into
the Middlesex Regiment in 1915 and promoted Lieutenant in 1916. He was
included in the final Georgian Poetry anthology.
He married in 1929 Canadian writer Jessie McDonald after she had
divorced Conrad Aiken, making Armstrong the stepfather of the young
Joan Aiken. He appears in disguised form as a character in Conrad
Aiken's Ushant.
[edit] Works
 Exodus (1912) poems
 Thirty New Poems (1918)
 Lady Hester Stanhope (1920) biography
 The Buzzards and Other Poems (1921)
 The Puppet Show (1922) stories
 Jeremy Taylor, A selection from his works (1923) editor
 The Foster-Mother (n.d.)
 The Bazaar and Other Stories (1924)
 The Goat and Compasses (1925) novel
 Desert, a Legend (1926) novel
 The Stepson (1927) novel
 Sir Pompey and Madame Juno (1927) stories
 Saint Hercules and Other Stories (1927) Paul Nash illustrations
 St. Christopher's Day (1928) novel
 Portrait of the Misses Harlowe (1928) story
 The Three-Cornered Hat (1928) translation
 Laughing (1928) essay
 The Sleeping Fury (1929) novel
 The Bird-catcher and other poems (1929)
 The Fiery Dive and Other Stories (1929)
 Adrian Glynde, A Novel (1930)
 Collected Poems (1931)
 Blind Man's Mark (1931)
 The Paintbox, "How and Why" Series (1931)
 The Romantic Adventures of Mr. Darby and of Sarah his Wife (1931)
novel
 The Fothergill Omnibus (1931) anthology
 Lover's Leap (1932)
 Fifty-four Conceits: A Collection of Epigrams and Epitaphs Serious
and Comic (1933)
 General Buntop's Miracle and Other Stories (1934)
 Venus Over Lannery (1936) novel
 A Case of Conscience and Other Tales (1937)
 Spanish Circus: Charles IV of Spain (1937)
 Victorian Peepshow (1938) autobiography
 The Major Pleasures of Life, An Anthology (1943)
 Chichester Concert (1944) ode
Yes, he's on (as Martin Armstrong (poet)). Of course, the PPP article
is a bit better than the Wikipedia article, since it starts with the
Wikipedia article and adds some extra features: links to 9 of his
poems online (not "In the Jungle", alas; not yet anyway), a couple of
cited quotes from the /Dictionary of Literary Biography/, and (best of
all) a picture courtesy of you-know-who.
Fun stuff, indeed...
http://pennyspoetry.wikia.com/wiki/Martin_Armstrong_(poet)
Great, I hope to have time to help with more of this and others,
shortly.

--
Music & poetry from Will Dockery:
http://www.reverbnation.com/willdockery
Will Dockery
2016-02-17 04:34:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by George Dance
Post by Will Dockery
Post by George Dance
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Will Dockery
I just went ahead and posted the answer here (which it seems anyone
could have found after "weeks" of searching, since it took me three
minutes), where the archives will declare me the winner for
generations to come... heh.
When did I say I searched for weeks? I never said anything of the kind.
But I hadn't been able to find it so I asked here for help. Good
thinking on my part, I thought. But, oooooohhhhh noooooooo. Somebody had
to act up, and now you've ruined it for everybody.
I hope you're happy.
How did he "ruin" it? We now all have new knowledge, which should be
better for all -- in particular for those who were asking about it.
I wasn't sure how to take that, myself... but to shift the subject
just slightly to the actual poem anf Martin Armstrong, the poet...
Is Martin Armstrong on your Poetry Wiki already?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martin_Armstrong_(writer)
Martin Donisthorpe Armstrong (* 2 October 1882 - † 24 February 1974)
was an English writer and poet, known for his stories. He was born in
Newcastle-upon-Tyne, and educated at Charterhouse and Pembroke
College, Cambridge. He served in World War I in the British Army in
France - a Private in the Artists' Rifles, he was commissioned into
the Middlesex Regiment in 1915 and promoted Lieutenant in 1916. He was
included in the final Georgian Poetry anthology.
He married in 1929 Canadian writer Jessie McDonald after she had
divorced Conrad Aiken, making Armstrong the stepfather of the young
Joan Aiken. He appears in disguised form as a character in Conrad
Aiken's Ushant.
[edit] Works
 Exodus (1912) poems
 Thirty New Poems (1918)
 Lady Hester Stanhope (1920) biography
 The Buzzards and Other Poems (1921)
 The Puppet Show (1922) stories
 Jeremy Taylor, A selection from his works (1923) editor
 The Foster-Mother (n.d.)
 The Bazaar and Other Stories (1924)
 The Goat and Compasses (1925) novel
 Desert, a Legend (1926) novel
 The Stepson (1927) novel
 Sir Pompey and Madame Juno (1927) stories
 Saint Hercules and Other Stories (1927) Paul Nash illustrations
 St. Christopher's Day (1928) novel
 Portrait of the Misses Harlowe (1928) story
 The Three-Cornered Hat (1928) translation
 Laughing (1928) essay
 The Sleeping Fury (1929) novel
 The Bird-catcher and other poems (1929)
 The Fiery Dive and Other Stories (1929)
 Adrian Glynde, A Novel (1930)
 Collected Poems (1931)
 Blind Man's Mark (1931)
 The Paintbox, "How and Why" Series (1931)
 The Romantic Adventures of Mr. Darby and of Sarah his Wife (1931)
novel
 The Fothergill Omnibus (1931) anthology
 Lover's Leap (1932)
 Fifty-four Conceits: A Collection of Epigrams and Epitaphs Serious
and Comic (1933)
 General Buntop's Miracle and Other Stories (1934)
 Venus Over Lannery (1936) novel
 A Case of Conscience and Other Tales (1937)
 Spanish Circus: Charles IV of Spain (1937)
 Victorian Peepshow (1938) autobiography
 The Major Pleasures of Life, An Anthology (1943)
 Chichester Concert (1944) ode
--
Music & poetry of Will Dockery & Friends:http://www.reverbnation.com/willdockery
Yes, he's on (as Martin Armstrong (poet)). Of course, the PPP article
is a bit better than the Wikipedia article, since it starts with the
Wikipedia article and adds some extra features: links to 9 of his
poems online (not "In the Jungle", alas; not yet anyway), a couple of
cited quotes from the /Dictionary of Literary Biography/, and (best of
all) a picture courtesy of you-know-who.
Bingo, Mensa George come through again.

:)
General Zod
2019-04-16 04:09:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by George Dance
Post by Will Dockery
Post by George Dance
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Will Dockery
I just went ahead and posted the answer here (which it seems anyone
could have found after "weeks" of searching, since it took me three
minutes), where the archives will declare me the winner for
generations to come... heh.
When did I say I searched for weeks? I never said anything of the kind.
But I hadn't been able to find it so I asked here for help. Good
thinking on my part, I thought. But, oooooohhhhh noooooooo. Somebody had
to act up, and now you've ruined it for everybody.
I hope you're happy.
How did he "ruin" it? We now all have new knowledge, which should be
better for all -- in particular for those who were asking about it.
I wasn't sure how to take that, myself... but to shift the subject
just slightly to the actual poem anf Martin Armstrong, the poet...
Is Martin Armstrong on your Poetry Wiki already?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martin_Armstrong_(writer)
Martin Donisthorpe Armstrong (* 2 October 1882 - † 24 February 1974)
was an English writer and poet, known for his stories. He was born in
Newcastle-upon-Tyne, and educated at Charterhouse and Pembroke
College, Cambridge. He served in World War I in the British Army in
France - a Private in the Artists' Rifles, he was commissioned into
the Middlesex Regiment in 1915 and promoted Lieutenant in 1916. He was
included in the final Georgian Poetry anthology.
He married in 1929 Canadian writer Jessie McDonald after she had
divorced Conrad Aiken, making Armstrong the stepfather of the young
Joan Aiken. He appears in disguised form as a character in Conrad
Aiken's Ushant.
[edit] Works
 Exodus (1912) poems
 Thirty New Poems (1918)
 Lady Hester Stanhope (1920) biography
 The Buzzards and Other Poems (1921)
 The Puppet Show (1922) stories
 Jeremy Taylor, A selection from his works (1923) editor
 The Foster-Mother (n.d.)
 The Bazaar and Other Stories (1924)
 The Goat and Compasses (1925) novel
 Desert, a Legend (1926) novel
 The Stepson (1927) novel
 Sir Pompey and Madame Juno (1927) stories
 Saint Hercules and Other Stories (1927) Paul Nash illustrations
 St. Christopher's Day (1928) novel
 Portrait of the Misses Harlowe (1928) story
 The Three-Cornered Hat (1928) translation
 Laughing (1928) essay
 The Sleeping Fury (1929) novel
 The Bird-catcher and other poems (1929)
 The Fiery Dive and Other Stories (1929)
 Adrian Glynde, A Novel (1930)
 Collected Poems (1931)
 Blind Man's Mark (1931)
 The Paintbox, "How and Why" Series (1931)
 The Romantic Adventures of Mr. Darby and of Sarah his Wife (1931)
novel
 The Fothergill Omnibus (1931) anthology
 Lover's Leap (1932)
 Fifty-four Conceits: A Collection of Epigrams and Epitaphs Serious
and Comic (1933)
 General Buntop's Miracle and Other Stories (1934)
 Venus Over Lannery (1936) novel
 A Case of Conscience and Other Tales (1937)
 Spanish Circus: Charles IV of Spain (1937)
 Victorian Peepshow (1938) autobiography
 The Major Pleasures of Life, An Anthology (1943)
 Chichester Concert (1944) ode
--
Music & poetry of Will Dockery & Friends:http://www.reverbnation.com/willdockery
Yes, he's on (as Martin Armstrong (poet)). Of course, the PPP article
is a bit better than the Wikipedia article, since it starts with the
Wikipedia article and adds some extra features: links to 9 of his
poems online (not "In the Jungle", alas; not yet anyway), a couple of
cited quotes from the /Dictionary of Literary Biography/, and (best of
all) a picture courtesy of you-know-who.
Outstanding.....
Will Dockery
2019-04-20 06:22:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by George Dance
Post by Will Dockery
Post by George Dance
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Will Dockery
I just went ahead and posted the answer here (which it seems anyone
could have found after "weeks" of searching, since it took me three
minutes), where the archives will declare me the winner for
generations to come... heh.
When did I say I searched for weeks? I never said anything of the kind.
But I hadn't been able to find it so I asked here for help. Good
thinking on my part, I thought. But, oooooohhhhh noooooooo. Somebody had
to act up, and now you've ruined it for everybody.
I hope you're happy.
How did he "ruin" it? We now all have new knowledge, which should be
better for all -- in particular for those who were asking about it.
I wasn't sure how to take that, myself... but to shift the subject
just slightly to the actual poem anf Martin Armstrong, the poet...
Is Martin Armstrong on your Poetry Wiki already?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martin_Armstrong_(writer)
Martin Donisthorpe Armstrong (* 2 October 1882 - † 24 February 1974)
was an English writer and poet, known for his stories. He was born in
Newcastle-upon-Tyne, and educated at Charterhouse and Pembroke
College, Cambridge. He served in World War I in the British Army in
France - a Private in the Artists' Rifles, he was commissioned into
the Middlesex Regiment in 1915 and promoted Lieutenant in 1916. He was
included in the final Georgian Poetry anthology.
He married in 1929 Canadian writer Jessie McDonald after she had
divorced Conrad Aiken, making Armstrong the stepfather of the young
Joan Aiken. He appears in disguised form as a character in Conrad
Aiken's Ushant.
[edit] Works
Exodus (1912) poems
Thirty New Poems (1918)
Lady Hester Stanhope (1920) biography
The Buzzards and Other Poems (1921)
The Puppet Show (1922) stories
Jeremy Taylor, A selection from his works (1923) editor
The Foster-Mother (n.d.)
The Bazaar and Other Stories (1924)
The Goat and Compasses (1925) novel
Desert, a Legend (1926) novel
The Stepson (1927) novel
Sir Pompey and Madame Juno (1927) stories
Saint Hercules and Other Stories (1927) Paul Nash illustrations
St. Christopher's Day (1928) novel
Portrait of the Misses Harlowe (1928) story
The Three-Cornered Hat (1928) translation
Laughing (1928) essay
The Sleeping Fury (1929) novel
The Bird-catcher and other poems (1929)
The Fiery Dive and Other Stories (1929)
Adrian Glynde, A Novel (1930)
Collected Poems (1931)
Blind Man's Mark (1931)
The Paintbox, "How and Why" Series (1931)
The Romantic Adventures of Mr. Darby and of Sarah his Wife (1931)
novel
The Fothergill Omnibus (1931) anthology
Lover's Leap (1932)
Fifty-four Conceits: A Collection of Epigrams and Epitaphs Serious
and Comic (1933)
General Buntop's Miracle and Other Stories (1934)
Venus Over Lannery (1936) novel
A Case of Conscience and Other Tales (1937)
Spanish Circus: Charles IV of Spain (1937)
Victorian Peepshow (1938) autobiography
The Major Pleasures of Life, An Anthology (1943)
Chichester Concert (1944) ode
--
Music & poetry of Will Dockery &
Friends:http://www.reverbnation.com/willdockery
Yes, he's on (as Martin Armstrong (poet)). Of course, the PPP article
is a bit better than the Wikipedia article, since it starts with the
Wikipedia article and adds some extra features: links to 9 of his
poems online (not "In the Jungle", alas; not yet anyway), a couple of
cited quotes from the /Dictionary of Literary Biography/, and (best of
all) a picture courtesy of you-know-who.
Outstanding.....
Classic stuff... thanks for finding it Zod.

Pennyaline
2012-02-17 03:18:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Okay, I found it, "In The Jungle" by Martin Armstrong... do I get a
cut of the pay?
http://books.google.com/books?q=%22the+tiger+with+his+jewelled+eye%22&hl=en&ie=UTF-8
===
http://tinyurl.com/The-Jungle-Martin-Armstrong
The English review, Volume 49‎ - Page 761Language Arts& Disciplines -
1929
In The Jungle By Martin Armstrong
Here through the sea-green twilight slinks The
tiger with his jewelled eye, And sleek and slim the crafty lynx, Prick-
eared,
like Satan, lurches by. The lion, ruffed in kingly gold, Awakes and
stretches ...
Thank you so much. I dare say you didn't find the poem itself in an
online search. Nice find on the book.

We'll talk percentage if the customer pays me (they often don't--it's
called a "read and run" on that site). Have your people call my people.

Again, I thank you.
Will Dockery
2012-02-17 03:27:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Will Dockery
Okay, I found it, "In The Jungle" by Martin Armstrong... do I get a
cut of the pay?
http://books.google.com/books?q=%22the+tiger+with+his+jewelled+eye%22...
===
http://tinyurl.com/The-Jungle-Martin-Armstrong
The English review, Volume 49‎ - Page 761Language Arts&  Disciplines -
1929
In The Jungle By Martin Armstrong
Here through the sea-green twilight slinks The
tiger with his jewelled eye, And sleek and slim the crafty lynx, Prick-
eared,
like Satan, lurches by. The lion, ruffed in kingly gold, Awakes and
stretches ...
Thank you so much. I dare say you didn't find the poem itself in an
online search. Nice find on the book.
We'll talk percentage if the customer pays me (they often don't--it's
called a "read and run" on that site). Have your people call my people.
Again, I thank you.
Well, you know where to find *me* so just come back here to the Usenet
poetry groups & I'll be here, as I have on and off for almost two
decades now...

But, just give me a credit for "assisting" you on the site & that way
if the customer stiffs us I can at least maybe get in with the site as
another "expert", a reference of sorts.

--
Music & poetry from Will Dockery & Friends:
http://www.reverbnation.com/willdockery
Hieronymous 707
2012-02-17 09:55:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Will Dockery
Okay, I found it, "In The Jungle" by Martin Armstrong... do I get a
cut of the pay?
http://books.google.com/books?q=%22the+tiger+with+his+jewelled+eye%22...
===
http://tinyurl.com/The-Jungle-Martin-Armstrong
The English review, Volume 49‎ - Page 761Language Arts&  Disciplines -
1929
In The Jungle By Martin Armstrong
Here through the sea-green twilight slinks The
tiger with his jewelled eye, And sleek and slim the crafty lynx, Prick-
eared,
like Satan, lurches by. The lion, ruffed in kingly gold, Awakes and
stretches ...
Thank you so much. I dare say you didn't find the poem itself in an
online search. Nice find on the book.
We'll talk percentage if the customer pays me (they often don't--it's
called a "read and run" on that site). Have your people call my people.
Again, I thank you.
Well, you know where to find *me* so just come back here to the Usenet
poetry groups & I'll be here, as I have on and off for almost two
decades now...
But, just give me a credit for "assisting" you on the site & that way
if the customer stiffs us I can at least maybe get in with the site as
another "expert", a reference of sorts.
--
Music & poetry from Will Dockery & Friends:http://www.reverbnation.com/willdockery
Don't quote me assisting or expert. Doing so makes you appear less
serious. I know you're an easy going guy but that doesn't mean you
shouldn't be taken seriously. Finding that poem wasn't easy. Real
experts couldn't find it. Don't diminish your skill with misapplied
modesty. You didn't assist anyone. You did all the work. You deserve
the lion's share of whatever payment comes from it. Penny should get a
referral or agency fee. If she has difficulty collecting from deadbeat
clients, that's a separate issue. You should still get paid.
Personally, I've never had an issue with deadbeat clients. People know
better than to not pay me. I'm too well connected. Not paying me would
be a very bad personal business decision for anybody to make so nobody
ever does. I'm just lucky people see things my way I guess.
Will Dockery
2012-02-17 14:59:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Hieronymous 707
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Will Dockery
Okay, I found it, "In The Jungle" by Martin Armstrong... do I get a
cut of the pay?
http://books.google.com/books?q=%22the+tiger+with+his+jewelled+eye%22...
===
http://tinyurl.com/The-Jungle-Martin-Armstrong
The English review, Volume 49‎ - Page 761Language Arts&  Disciplines -
1929
In The Jungle By Martin Armstrong
Here through the sea-green twilight slinks The
tiger with his jewelled eye, And sleek and slim the crafty lynx, Prick-
eared,
like Satan, lurches by. The lion, ruffed in kingly gold, Awakes and
stretches ...
Thank you so much. I dare say you didn't find the poem itself in an
online search. Nice find on the book.
We'll talk percentage if the customer pays me (they often don't--it's
called a "read and run" on that site). Have your people call my people.
Again, I thank you.
Well, you know where to find *me* so just come back here to the Usenet
poetry groups & I'll be here, as I have on and off for almost two
decades now...
But, just give me a credit for "assisting" you on the site & that way
if the customer stiffs us I can at least maybe get in with the site as
another "expert", a reference of sorts.
Don't quote me assisting or expert. Doing so makes you appear less
serious. I know you're an easy going guy but that doesn't mean you
shouldn't be taken seriously. Finding that poem wasn't easy. Real
experts couldn't find it. Don't diminish your skill with misapplied
modesty. You didn't assist anyone. You did all the work. You deserve
the lion's share of whatever payment comes from it. Penny should get a
referral or agency fee. If she has difficulty collecting from deadbeat
clients, that's a separate issue. You should still get paid.
Personally, I've never had an issue with deadbeat clients. People know
better than to not pay me. I'm too well connected. Not paying me would
be a very bad personal business decision for anybody to make so nobody
ever does. I'm just lucky people see things my way I guess.
As usual, your logic is difficult-to-impossible to argue with, Corey.

--
Music & poetry of Will Dockery & Friends:
http://www.reverbnation.com/willdockery
Will Dockery
2012-02-16 19:15:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Hieronymous 707
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Pennyaline
To the best of recollection, it goes some'at
Here through the seagreen twilight
Slinks the tiger with his jewelled eye
And slick and slim the crafty lynx
Prick eared like satan lurches by
Maybe I need some cake, too.
Interestingly, all I'm getting from searching one of the lines here,
http://www.justanswer.com/general/67bst-trying-years-trace-metaphysic...
I have been trying for some years to trace a metaphysical poem
Customer Question
I have been trying for some years to trace a metaphysical poem
starting
"Here through the seagreen twilight
Slinks the tiger with his jewelled eye
And slick and slim the crafty lynx
Prick eared like satan lurches by"
Can you help me? I do not know the poet
Google Poetry first line services Ask Jeeves etc
Submitted: 10 days and 14 hours ago.
Category: General
Value: £14
Status: AWAITING CUSTOMER ACTION
Expert:  AngelaCM-Mod replied 6 days and 4 hours ago.
Thank you for your patience, your business is very important to us, we
are waiting on the Expert with the right expertise to come online.
Feel free to let us know if you would like us to continue searching
for an Expert or if you would like us to close your question. Thank
you for your understanding!
Customer replied 5 days and 15 hours ago.
Carry on searching
Best wishes
Ros White
 Expert:  Pennyaline replied 3 days and 12 hours ago.
Was it a standard form poem, or an epic like "The Knight in the
Tiger's Skin"? It wasn't Blake's "The Tiger," was it?
Customer replied 3 days and 9 hours ago.
It was a standard form poem. Blake's poem starts "Tyger Tygre burning
bright, in the forests of the night".
The poem I'm looking for is about the fall of man from the garden of
Eden, which is depicted as a jungle
 Expert:  Pennyaline replied 3 days and 9 hours ago.
I know "The Tiger" and I'm asking because lots of people misremember
it as something it isn't. That's what I wanted to establish. But
you've given me more to work with. We're from the same era, but I
don't remember ever reading a poem like the one you're looking for at
all...doesn't mean I won't keep looking though!
 Expert:  Pennyaline replied 1 days and 22 hours ago.
You know, I actually might be onto your poem!
----
Well, as far as the team of experts... we're trying... heh!
--
http://www.reverbnation.com/willdockery
Post by Hieronymous 707
Speak for yourself. I'm not trying to do anything for this person. I'm
no expert
Lighten up, Hi... it was a joke.

--
Thanks to John Charles Griffin & Roasted Cafe and Lounge for setting
up & helping co-ordinate the Macon Georgia debut of the Shadowville
All-Stars on Friday, April 6th. We look forward to weird & wondrous
moments of poetry, art, sound & vision.

Located at:
Roasted Cafe & Lounge
442 Second St.
Macon, GA 31201

https://www.facebook.com/events/255946177814366/#!/events/255946177814366/
Pennyaline
2012-02-16 13:17:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Pennyaline
To the best of recollection, it goes some'at
Here through the seagreen twilight
Slinks the tiger with his jewelled eye
And slick and slim the crafty lynx
Prick eared like satan lurches by
Maybe I need some cake, too.
<Customer interaction snipped>
Post by Will Dockery
Well, as far as the team of experts... we're trying... heh!
I'd searched for this poem for days without result, when at last Google
hit on some of the lines. I was beyond excited, thinking I had finally
found it, but all it was in the end was the JA entry. Oh well.

Thank you again for the tips you offered.
Will Dockery
2012-02-17 03:19:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Pennyaline. from the looks of the timestamps on your posts at the Just
Answer website, you've been looking for the Armstrong poem for around
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Pennyaline
To the best of recollection, it goes some'at
Here through the seagreen twilight
Slinks the tiger with his jewelled eye
And slick and slim the crafty lynx
Prick eared like satan lurches by
Maybe I need some cake, too.
Interestingly, all I'm getting from searching one of the lines here,
http://www.justanswer.com/general/67bst-trying-years-trace-metaphysic...
I have been trying for some years to trace a metaphysical poem
Customer Question
I have been trying for some years to trace a metaphysical poem
starting
"Here through the seagreen twilight
Slinks the tiger with his jewelled eye
And slick and slim the crafty lynx
Prick eared like satan lurches by"
Can you help me? I do not know the poet
Google Poetry first line services Ask Jeeves etc
Submitted: 10 days and 14 hours ago.
Category: General
Value: £14
Status: AWAITING CUSTOMER ACTION
Expert:  AngelaCM-Mod replied 6 days and 4 hours ago.
Thank you for your patience, your business is very important to us, we
are waiting on the Expert with the right expertise to come online.
Feel free to let us know if you would like us to continue searching
for an Expert or if you would like us to close your question. Thank
you for your understanding!
Customer replied 5 days and 15 hours ago.
Carry on searching
Best wishes
Ros White
 Expert:  Pennyaline replied 3 days and 12 hours ago.
Was it a standard form poem, or an epic like "The Knight in the
Tiger's Skin"? It wasn't Blake's "The Tiger," was it?
Customer replied 3 days and 9 hours ago.
It was a standard form poem. Blake's poem starts "Tyger Tygre burning
bright, in the forests of the night".
The poem I'm looking for is about the fall of man from the garden of
Eden, which is depicted as a jungle
 Expert:  Pennyaline replied 3 days and 9 hours ago.
I know "The Tiger" and I'm asking because lots of people misremember
it as something it isn't. That's what I wanted to establish. But
you've given me more to work with. We're from the same era, but I
don't remember ever reading a poem like the one you're looking for at
all...doesn't mean I won't keep looking though!
 Expert:  Pennyaline replied 1 days and 22 hours ago.
You know, I actually might be onto your poem!
----
Well, as far as the team of experts... we're trying... heh!
--
Music & poetry from Will Dockery & Friends:
http://www.reverbnation.com/willdockery
Pennyaline
2012-02-17 03:44:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Pennyaline. from the looks of the timestamps on your posts at the Just
Answer website, you've been looking for the Armstrong poem for around
Mr. Dockery, the question was originally posted on February 5th. I
didn't come into it until February 12th, according to the timestamp on
my first post in that thread.
Will Dockery
2012-02-18 20:32:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Adam Lynn
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Pennyaline
There is, somewhere out there, a poem from the metaphysical era that
Post by Pennyaline
sets the Garden of Eden as a jungle. I am looking for that poem and the
name of its author. Any ideas?
I'll write it for you if the price is right.
What I was hoping for is the one that already exists. Now if you're not
going to be serious about this, there'll be no cake!
Can you remember one line of the poem?
Give me one line, and I'll spend some time
trying to help you find it, but you've got to
give me the cake first, because I'm hungry,
and it's hard to think.....
Alright then. Here's a little bit of your cake.
There. Better now? Okay. To the best of recollection, it goes some'at
Now, now, Penny, we have a "sense of humor", but the above was pretty
dishonest, you have to admit.

And not only does it lead the casual reader to think that you've been
searching for the poem for at /least/ some weeks, but your quoting the
lines from "your" memory, actually makes it look like you may have
been wondering about this poem for /years/, possibly.

It almost looks like you had no idea we'd be able to see your original
posts on Just Answer, Penny... did you?
Post by Pennyaline
Here through the seagreen twilight
Slinks the tiger with his jewelled eye
And slick and slim the crafty lynx
Prick eared like satan lurches by
Maybe I need some cake, too.
And the twenty bucks from Just Answer to buy some of that "cake"
with... hint hint.

--
"Whither goest thou, America, in thy shiny black car in the night?" -
Jack Kerouac
http://www.reverbnation.com/play_now/song_11596860
Will Dockery
2012-02-14 03:51:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pennyaline
There is, somewhere out there, a poem from the metaphysical era that
sets the Garden of Eden as a jungle. I am looking for that poem and the
name of its author. Any ideas?
Jeeze, that's a good one...
DoubleV
2012-02-14 04:17:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pennyaline
There is, somewhere out there, a poem from the metaphysical era that
sets the Garden of Eden as a jungle. I am looking for that poem and the
name of its author. Any ideas?
I couldn't find it.
--
--Vic (;,,; )
Will Dockery
2012-02-14 04:40:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by DoubleV
Post by Pennyaline
There is, somewhere out there, a poem from the metaphysical era that
sets the Garden of Eden as a jungle. I am looking for that poem and the
name of its author. Any ideas?
I couldn't find it.
--
--Vic (;,,; )
I think George Dance might have it in his Public Domain Poetry Page...

Captain Andrew Marvell, perhaps?

--
Music & poetry from Will Dockery & Friends:
http://www.reverbnation.com/willdockery
Pennyaline
2012-02-14 04:59:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by DoubleV
Post by Pennyaline
There is, somewhere out there, a poem from the metaphysical era that
sets the Garden of Eden as a jungle. I am looking for that poem and the
name of its author. Any ideas?
I couldn't find it.
--
--Vic (;,,; )
I think George Dance might have it in his Public Domain Poetry Page...
Captain Andrew Marvell, perhaps?
--
http://www.reverbnation.com/willdockery
I was wondering if it was Marvell but I haven't been able to find it. I
can't find the Public Domain Poetry Page, either. Can you direct me?
Pennyaline
2012-02-14 05:34:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pennyaline
I was wondering if it was Marvell but I haven't been able to find it. I
can't find the Public Domain Poetry Page, either. Can you direct me?
On second thought, I don't think it's Marvell. "The Garden" isn't the
one I'm looking for.
Will Dockery
2012-02-14 08:49:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Pennyaline
There is, somewhere out there, a poem from the metaphysical era that
Post by Pennyaline
sets the Garden of Eden as a jungle. I am looking for that poem and the
name of its author. Any ideas?
I couldn't find it.
--
--Vic (;,,; )
I think George Dance might have it in his Public Domain Poetry Page...
Captain Andrew Marvell, perhaps?
--
http://www.reverbnation.com/willdockery
I was wondering if it was Marvell but I haven't been able to find it. I
can't find the Public Domain Poetry Page, either. Can you direct me?
George Dance is a regular on this newsgroup, and will no doubt be
along here shortly... meanwhile, this is George's Wiki:

http://pennyspoetry.wikia.com/wiki/Penny%27s_poetry_pages_Wiki
Hieronymous Corey
2012-02-14 11:59:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pennyaline
There is, somewhere out there, a poem from the metaphysical era that
sets the Garden of Eden as a jungle. I am looking for that poem and the
name of its author. Any ideas?
No, I have no idea which poem you mean. All of the so called
metaphysical poets wrote poems about the Garden of Eden though,
Marvell wrote The Garden, Treherne Eden, and so forth. The list of
metaphysical era English poets is relatively short. It shouldn't take
much time at all to go down the list one by one until you find the
poet and poem you're looking for. I wrote a poem titled The Garden Off
My Den about my own backyard but it's not metaphysical or anything.
Will Dockery
2012-02-14 14:37:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Hieronymous Corey
Post by Pennyaline
There is, somewhere out there, a poem from the metaphysical era that
sets the Garden of Eden as a jungle. I am looking for that poem and the
name of its author. Any ideas?
No, I have no idea which poem you mean. All of the so called
metaphysical poets wrote poems about the Garden of Eden though,
Marvell wrote The Garden, Treherne Eden, and so forth. The list of
metaphysical era English poets is relatively short. It shouldn't take
much time at all to go down the list one by one until you find the
poet and poem you're looking for. I wrote a poem titled The Garden Off
My Den about my own backyard but it's not metaphysical or anything.
I wrote "Grove of Mystery", which isn't the Garden of Eden or a jungle
but really a little bit of underbrush behind Books-A-Million on Macon
Road where the poetry reading folks used to sneak off to for private
moments before during and after the readings... that was way back in
the 1990s when things were a lot more "metaphysical":

http://groups.google.com/group/rec.arts.poems/msg/284b45b424059df4?hl=en

Grove Of Mystery

So many memories here,
in this grove of mystery.
Smoke floats gently, kind of sad,
big green and little Miss Olive,
green eyes impossibly unique.
We're down by law.

On this walkabout, hot, stoned, heartsick.
We all know this is the time to be wise,
when to hone and think on my feet.
Pieces of Eight vanish from Poseidon,
ninety percent law, ten percent water.

Passing through underground Shadowville,
heartbreaks as far as eye can see.
Lady Abi cooking in her tent,
shopping cart and umbrella,
behind the shut down International club.
She's plotting out miniscule facts,
and directions.

Love unconditionally,
the direction the heart must take.
In set adrift,
clear light in my eyes when I wake.

My heart's just not in it,
Raven is chained away in the infirmary.
Soul float through clouds,
enforced separation,
just a bunch of too much junkie buisness.
I's spellbound, now struck dumb.

In the lighted corridors,
the trees make shadows.
The cars and airplanes in a montage,
constantly changing and in motion.
Moon is good to have back,
if this was ever really true.
So many memories here,
in this grove of mystery.

-Will Dockery 5/25/99

--
Music & poetry of Will Dockery & Friends:
http://www.reverbnation.com/willdockery
Pennyaline
2012-02-14 19:33:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Hieronymous Corey
Post by Pennyaline
There is, somewhere out there, a poem from the metaphysical era that
sets the Garden of Eden as a jungle. I am looking for that poem and the
name of its author. Any ideas?
No, I have no idea which poem you mean. All of the so called
metaphysical poets wrote poems about the Garden of Eden though,
Marvell wrote The Garden, Treherne Eden, and so forth. The list of
metaphysical era English poets is relatively short. It shouldn't take
much time at all to go down the list one by one until you find the
poet and poem you're looking for. I wrote a poem titled The Garden Off
My Den about my own backyard but it's not metaphysical or anything.
It's neither Marvell nor Traherne. You're right, the list of
metaphysical poets is short, but I don't have the collected works of
each one at hand. If I had, I wouldn't be asking for help. Thanks
anyway, and if anyone does know, I'd appreciate it if you'd pass it this
way!
Hieronymous Corey
2012-02-14 20:09:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Hieronymous Corey
Post by Pennyaline
There is, somewhere out there, a poem from the metaphysical era that
sets the Garden of Eden as a jungle. I am looking for that poem and the
name of its author. Any ideas?
No, I have no idea which poem you mean. All of the so called
metaphysical poets wrote poems about the Garden of Eden though,
Marvell wrote The Garden, Treherne Eden, and so forth. The list of
metaphysical era English poets is relatively short. It shouldn't take
much time at all to go down the list one by one until you find the
poet and poem you're looking for. I wrote a poem titled The Garden Off
My Den about my own backyard but it's not metaphysical or anything.
It's neither Marvell nor Traherne. You're right, the list of
metaphysical poets is short, but I don't have the collected works of
each one at hand. If I had, I wouldn't be asking for help. Thanks
anyway, and if anyone does know, I'd appreciate it if you'd pass it this
way!
Good Hunting!

John Donne (1572–1631) http://www.luminarium.org/sevenlit/donne/donnebib.htm
George Herbert (1593–1633) http://www.luminarium.org/sevenlit/herbert/herbbib.htm
Andrew Marvell (1621–1678) http://www.luminarium.org/sevenlit/marvell/marvbib.htm
Saint Robert Southwell (c. 1561–1595) http://www.luminarium.org/renlit/southbib.htm
Richard Crashaw (c. 1613–1649) http://www.poemhunter.com/richard-crashaw/
Thomas Traherne (1636 or 1637 – 1674) http://www.poemhunter.com/thomas-traherne/
Henry Vaughan (1622–1695) http://www.poemhunter.com/henry-vaughan/

The following poets have also been sometimes considered metaphysical
poets[citation needed]:

George Chapman (c. 1559–1634) http://www.poemhunter.com/george-chapman/
Thomas Carew (1595–1640) http://www.poemhunter.com/thomas-carew/
Abraham Cowley (1618–1667) http://www.poemhunter.com/abraham-cowley/
Edward Herbert (1583–1648) http://www.luminarium.org/sevenlit/chirbury/chirbio.htm
Richard Leigh http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Leigh_(poet)
Katherine Philips (1632–1664), http://www.poemhunter.com/katherine-philips/
Sir John Suckling (1609–1642) http://www.poemhunter.com/sir-john-suckling/poems/
Edward Taylor (c. 1642–1729) http://www.poemhunter.com/edward-taylor/poems/
Anne Bradstreet (c. 1612–1672) http://www.annebradstreet.com/anne_bradstreet_poems.htm
John Wilmot, 2nd Earl of Rochester (1647–1680)
http://www.poemhunter.com/lord-john-wilmot/poems/
Will Dockery
2012-02-15 00:39:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Hieronymous Corey
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Hieronymous Corey
Post by Pennyaline
There is, somewhere out there, a poem from the metaphysical era that
sets the Garden of Eden as a jungle. I am looking for that poem and the
name of its author. Any ideas?
No, I have no idea which poem you mean. All of the so called
metaphysical poets wrote poems about the Garden of Eden though,
Marvell wrote The Garden, Treherne Eden, and so forth. The list of
metaphysical era English poets is relatively short. It shouldn't take
much time at all to go down the list one by one until you find the
poet and poem you're looking for. I wrote a poem titled The Garden Off
My Den about my own backyard but it's not metaphysical or anything.
It's neither Marvell nor Traherne. You're right, the list of
metaphysical poets is short, but I don't have the collected works of
each one at hand. If I had, I wouldn't be asking for help. Thanks
anyway, and if anyone does know, I'd appreciate it if you'd pass it this
way!
Good Hunting!
John Donne (1572–1631)http://www.luminarium.org/sevenlit/donne/donnebib.htm
George Herbert (1593–1633)http://www.luminarium.org/sevenlit/herbert/herbbib.htm
Andrew Marvell (1621–1678)http://www.luminarium.org/sevenlit/marvell/marvbib.htm
Saint Robert Southwell (c. 1561–1595)http://www.luminarium.org/renlit/southbib.htm
Richard Crashaw (c. 1613–1649)http://www.poemhunter.com/richard-crashaw/
Thomas Traherne (1636 or 1637 – 1674)http://www.poemhunter.com/thomas-traherne/
Henry Vaughan (1622–1695)http://www.poemhunter.com/henry-vaughan/
The following poets have also been sometimes considered metaphysical
George Chapman (c. 1559–1634)http://www.poemhunter.com/george-chapman/
Thomas Carew (1595–1640)http://www.poemhunter.com/thomas-carew/
Abraham Cowley (1618–1667)http://www.poemhunter.com/abraham-cowley/
Edward Herbert (1583–1648)http://www.luminarium.org/sevenlit/chirbury/chirbio.htm
Richard Leighhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Leigh_(poet)
Katherine Philips (1632–1664),http://www.poemhunter.com/katherine-philips/
Sir John Suckling (1609–1642)http://www.poemhunter.com/sir-john-suckling/poems/
Edward Taylor (c. 1642–1729)http://www.poemhunter.com/edward-taylor/poems/
Anne Bradstreet (c. 1612–1672)http://www.annebradstreet.com/anne_bradstreet_poems.htm
John Wilmot, 2nd Earl of Rochester (1647–1680)http://www.poemhunter.com/lord-john-wilmot/poems/
Great list, thanks Corey!

--
Gone Too Far / Will Dockery & The Shadowville All-Stars:
http://www.reverbnation.com/play_now/song_11596860
Pennyaline
2012-02-15 05:39:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Hieronymous Corey
Good Hunting!
John Donne (1572–1631)http://www.luminarium.org/sevenlit/donne/donnebib.htm
George Herbert (1593–1633)http://www.luminarium.org/sevenlit/herbert/herbbib.htm
Andrew Marvell (1621–1678)http://www.luminarium.org/sevenlit/marvell/marvbib.htm
Saint Robert Southwell (c. 1561–1595)http://www.luminarium.org/renlit/southbib.htm
Richard Crashaw (c. 1613–1649)http://www.poemhunter.com/richard-crashaw/
Thomas Traherne (1636 or 1637 – 1674)http://www.poemhunter.com/thomas-traherne/
Henry Vaughan (1622–1695)http://www.poemhunter.com/henry-vaughan/
The following poets have also been sometimes considered metaphysical
George Chapman (c. 1559–1634)http://www.poemhunter.com/george-chapman/
Thomas Carew (1595–1640)http://www.poemhunter.com/thomas-carew/
Abraham Cowley (1618–1667)http://www.poemhunter.com/abraham-cowley/
Edward Herbert (1583–1648)http://www.luminarium.org/sevenlit/chirbury/chirbio.htm
Richard Leighhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Leigh_(poet)
Katherine Philips (1632–1664),http://www.poemhunter.com/katherine-philips/
Sir John Suckling (1609–1642)http://www.poemhunter.com/sir-john-suckling/poems/
Edward Taylor (c. 1642–1729)http://www.poemhunter.com/edward-taylor/poems/
Anne Bradstreet (c. 1612–1672)http://www.annebradstreet.com/anne_bradstreet_poems.htm
John Wilmot, 2nd Earl of Rochester (1647–1680)http://www.poemhunter.com/lord-john-wilmot/poems/
Great list, thanks Corey!
Yes, thanks! It's straight from Wikipedia's Metaphysical Poets listing.
I had already started to go through it before consulting this forum, but
it is somewhat... how can I put this?

Well anyway, it seems that this is as good as it's going to get. I was
really hoping that someone would know. Thanks anyway!
Adam Lynn
2012-02-15 06:51:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Hieronymous Corey
Good Hunting!
John Donne (1572–1631)http://www.luminarium.org/sevenlit/donne/donnebib.htm
George Herbert (1593–1633)http://www.luminarium.org/sevenlit/herbert/herbbib.htm
Andrew Marvell (1621–1678)http://www.luminarium.org/sevenlit/marvell/marvbib.htm
Saint Robert Southwell (c. 1561–1595)http://www.luminarium.org/renlit/southbib.htm
Richard Crashaw (c. 1613–1649)http://www.poemhunter.com/richard-crashaw/
Thomas Traherne (1636 or 1637 – 1674)http://www.poemhunter.com/thomas-traherne/
Henry Vaughan (1622–1695)http://www.poemhunter.com/henry-vaughan/
The following poets have also been sometimes considered metaphysical
George Chapman (c. 1559–1634)http://www.poemhunter.com/george-chapman/
Thomas Carew (1595–1640)http://www.poemhunter.com/thomas-carew/
Abraham Cowley (1618–1667)http://www.poemhunter.com/abraham-cowley/
Edward Herbert (1583–1648)http://www.luminarium.org/sevenlit/chirbury/chirbio.htm
Richard Leighhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Leigh_(poet)
Katherine Philips (1632–1664),http://www.poemhunter.com/katherine-philips/
Sir John Suckling (1609–1642)http://www.poemhunter.com/sir-john-suckling/poems/
Edward Taylor (c. 1642–1729)http://www.poemhunter.com/edward-taylor/poems/
Anne Bradstreet (c. 1612–1672)http://www.annebradstreet.com/anne_bradstreet_poems.htm
John Wilmot, 2nd Earl of Rochester (1647–1680)http://www.poemhunter.com/lord-john-wilmot/poems/
Great list, thanks Corey!
Yes, thanks! It's straight from Wikipedia's Metaphysical Poets listing.
I had already started to go through it before consulting this forum, but
it is somewhat... how can I put this?
Well anyway, it seems that this is as good as it's going to get. I was
really hoping that someone would know. Thanks anyway!
Sorry I couldn't help. Thanks for the cake though;
it tasted good.
Hieronymous Corey
2012-02-15 09:29:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Hieronymous Corey
Good Hunting!
John Donne (1572–1631)http://www.luminarium.org/sevenlit/donne/donnebib.htm
George Herbert (1593–1633)http://www.luminarium.org/sevenlit/herbert/herbbib.htm
Andrew Marvell (1621–1678)http://www.luminarium.org/sevenlit/marvell/marvbib.htm
Saint Robert Southwell (c. 1561–1595)http://www.luminarium.org/renlit/southbib.htm
Richard Crashaw (c. 1613–1649)http://www.poemhunter.com/richard-crashaw/
Thomas Traherne (1636 or 1637 – 1674)http://www.poemhunter.com/thomas-traherne/
Henry Vaughan (1622–1695)http://www.poemhunter.com/henry-vaughan/
The following poets have also been sometimes considered metaphysical
George Chapman (c. 1559–1634)http://www.poemhunter.com/george-chapman/
Thomas Carew (1595–1640)http://www.poemhunter.com/thomas-carew/
Abraham Cowley (1618–1667)http://www.poemhunter.com/abraham-cowley/
Edward Herbert (1583–1648)http://www.luminarium.org/sevenlit/chirbury/chirbio.htm
Richard Leighhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Leigh_(poet)
Katherine Philips (1632–1664),http://www.poemhunter.com/katherine-philips/
Sir John Suckling (1609–1642)http://www.poemhunter.com/sir-john-suckling/poems/
Edward Taylor (c. 1642–1729)http://www.poemhunter.com/edward-taylor/poems/
Anne Bradstreet (c. 1612–1672)http://www.annebradstreet.com/anne_bradstreet_poems.htm
John Wilmot, 2nd Earl of Rochester (1647–1680)http://www.poemhunter.com/lord-john-wilmot/poems/
Great list, thanks Corey!
Yes, thanks! It's straight from Wikipedia's Metaphysical Poets listing.
I had already started to go through it before consulting this forum, but
it is somewhat... how can I put this?
Well anyway, it seems that this is as good as it's going to get. I was
really hoping that someone would know. Thanks anyway!
I know exactly which poem you're looking for. I found it while putting
that list of links together with the names of metaphysical poets. I
won't say what it is though because I'm a heartless uncaring SOB.
Pennyaline
2012-02-15 19:13:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Hieronymous Corey
I know exactly which poem you're looking for. I found it while putting
that list of links together with the names of metaphysical poets. I
won't say what it is though because I'm a heartless uncaring SOB.
I could tell at once. You're very good at it!
Hieronymous Corey
2012-02-15 19:40:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Hieronymous Corey
I know exactly which poem you're looking for. I found it while putting
that list of links together with the names of metaphysical poets. I
won't say what it is though because I'm a heartless uncaring SOB.
I could tell at once. You're very good at it!
I am exceedingly well practiced in the fine art of heartless uncaring
SOBness. My technique is quite sophistcated. Please excuse that I feel
I must talk down to you. You seem short to me.
Pennyaline
2012-02-16 02:14:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Hieronymous Corey
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Hieronymous Corey
I know exactly which poem you're looking for. I found it while putting
that list of links together with the names of metaphysical poets. I
won't say what it is though because I'm a heartless uncaring SOB.
I could tell at once. You're very good at it!
I am exceedingly well practiced in the fine art of heartless uncaring
SOBness. My technique is quite sophistcated. Please excuse that I feel
I must talk down to you. You seem short to me.
Not really. It's that pedestal everyone has you on, you see.
Hieronymous C
2012-02-16 02:19:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Hieronymous Corey
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Hieronymous Corey
I know exactly which poem you're looking for. I found it while putting
that list of links together with the names of metaphysical poets. I
won't say what it is though because I'm a heartless uncaring SOB.
I could tell at once. You're very good at it!
I am exceedingly well practiced in the fine art of heartless uncaring
SOBness. My technique is quite sophistcated. Please excuse that I feel
I must talk down to you. You seem short to me.
Not really. It's that pedestal everyone has you on, you see.
Am I statueque? I don't mean to be. Pigeons, you know.
Peter J Ross
2012-02-15 20:15:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
In alt.arts.poetry.comments on Tue, 14 Feb 2012 22:39:00 -0700,
Post by Pennyaline
Well anyway, it seems that this is as good as it's going to get. I was
really hoping that someone would know. Thanks anyway!
Not everybody visits Usenet every day. Wait a while. So far, some of
our resident trolls and kooks have informed you of what Google tells
them. It will take longer to look your question up in books.

While you're waiting, here's George Herbert's metaphysical Eden:

Paradise
--------

I blesse Thee, Lord, because I GROW
Among Thy trees, which in a ROW
To Thee both fruit and order OW.

What open force or hidden CHARM
Can blast my fruit, or bring me HARM,
While the inclosure is Thine ARM?

Inclose me still, for fear I START;
Be to me rather sharp and TART
Then let me want Thy hand and ART.

When Thou dost greater judgements SPARE,
And with Thy knife but prune and PARE,
Ev'n fruitful trees more fruitfull ARE:

Such sharpnes shows the sweetest FREND:
Such cuttings rather heal then REND,
And such beginnings touch their END.
--
PJR :-)
μέτρα φυλάσσεσθαι: καιρὸς δ' ἐπὶ πᾶσιν ἄριστος. (Hesiod)
Adam Lynn
2012-02-15 21:32:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter J Ross
In alt.arts.poetry.comments on Tue, 14 Feb 2012 22:39:00 -0700,
Post by Pennyaline
Well anyway, it seems that this is as good as it's going to get. I was
really hoping that someone would know. Thanks anyway!
Not everybody visits Usenet every day. Wait a while. So far, some of
our resident trolls and kooks have informed you of what Google tells
them. It will take longer to look your question up in books.
Paradise
--------
I blesse Thee, Lord, because I GROW
Among Thy trees, which in a ROW
To Thee both fruit and order OW.
What open force or hidden CHARM
Can blast my fruit, or bring me HARM,
While the inclosure is Thine ARM?
Inclose me still, for fear I START;
Be to me rather sharp and TART
Then let me want Thy hand and ART.
When Thou dost greater judgements SPARE,
And with Thy knife but prune and PARE,
Such cuttings rather heal then REND,
And such beginnings touch their END.
--
PJR :-)
μέτρα φυλάσσεσθαι: καιρὸς δ' ἐπὶ πᾶσιν ἄριστος. (Hesiod)
So? Walking is great, yes,
but for research, really,
Peter, how pedestrian.
George Dance
2012-02-16 01:07:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter J Ross
In alt.arts.poetry.comments on Tue, 14 Feb 2012 22:39:00 -0700,
Post by Pennyaline
Well anyway, it seems that this is as good as it's going to get. I was
really hoping that someone would know. Thanks anyway!
Not everybody visits Usenet every day. Wait a while. So far, some of
our resident trolls and kooks have informed you of what Google tells
them. It will take longer to look your question up in books.
Stupid ~PJ~ troll: Google has hundreds more books, online, than you've
ever owned, read, or (most likely) even seen. The same for Project
Gutenberg, for Bartleby.com, and for at least two dozen universities.
The chances of you or Gwythera having it in your library, when
Pannyaline has already struck out at all of these major sources, is as
small as is your talent: virtually nil.
Post by Peter J Ross
Paradise
snip - I'm sure Pennyaline doesn't need you to copy-and-paste
something as well known as that for her.
Pennyaline
2012-02-16 02:22:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by George Dance
Post by Peter J Ross
In alt.arts.poetry.comments on Tue, 14 Feb 2012 22:39:00 -0700,
Post by Pennyaline
Well anyway, it seems that this is as good as it's going to get. I was
really hoping that someone would know. Thanks anyway!
Not everybody visits Usenet every day. Wait a while. So far, some of
our resident trolls and kooks have informed you of what Google tells
them. It will take longer to look your question up in books.
Stupid ~PJ~ troll: Google has hundreds more books, online, than you've
ever owned, read, or (most likely) even seen. The same for Project
Gutenberg, for Bartleby.com, and for at least two dozen universities.
The chances of you or Gwythera having it in your library, when
Pannyaline has already struck out at all of these major sources, is as
small as is your talent: virtually nil.
Post by Peter J Ross
Paradise
snip - I'm sure Pennyaline doesn't need you to copy-and-paste
something as well known as that for her.
You're correct. I've read it in the past, and again just a few days ago
in the course of my hunt.

Frankly, I have no memory of a metaphysical poem that portrays Eden as a
jungle the way the sought after poem purportedly does. The idea is
right, but the language and style are not. Still, I'll exhaust the
metaphysical sources before I move the search to another era.
George Dance
2012-02-16 00:58:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Hieronymous Corey
Good Hunting!
John Donne (1572–1631)http://www.luminarium.org/sevenlit/donne/donnebib.htm
George Herbert (1593–1633)http://www.luminarium.org/sevenlit/herbert/herbbib.htm
Andrew Marvell (1621–1678)http://www.luminarium.org/sevenlit/marvell/marvbib.htm
Saint Robert Southwell (c. 1561–1595)http://www.luminarium.org/renlit/southbib.htm
Richard Crashaw (c. 1613–1649)http://www.poemhunter.com/richard-crashaw/
Thomas Traherne (1636 or 1637 – 1674)http://www.poemhunter.com/thomas-traherne/
Henry Vaughan (1622–1695)http://www.poemhunter.com/henry-vaughan/
The following poets have also been sometimes considered metaphysical
George Chapman (c. 1559–1634)http://www.poemhunter.com/george-chapman/
Thomas Carew (1595–1640)http://www.poemhunter.com/thomas-carew/
Abraham Cowley (1618–1667)http://www.poemhunter.com/abraham-cowley/
Edward Herbert (1583–1648)http://www.luminarium.org/sevenlit/chirbury/chirbio.htm
Richard Leighhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Leigh_(poet)
Katherine Philips (1632–1664),http://www.poemhunter.com/katherine-philips/
Sir John Suckling (1609–1642)http://www.poemhunter.com/sir-john-suckling/poems/
Edward Taylor (c. 1642–1729)http://www.poemhunter.com/edward-taylor/poems/
Anne Bradstreet (c. 1612–1672)http://www.annebradstreet.com/anne_bradstreet_poems.htm
John Wilmot, 2nd Earl of Rochester (1647–1680)http://www.poemhunter.com/lord-john-wilmot/poems/
Great list, thanks Corey!
Yes, thanks! It's straight from Wikipedia's Metaphysical Poets listing.
I had already started to go through it before consulting this forum, but
it is somewhat... how can I put this?
Well anyway, it seems that this is as good as it's going to get. I was
really hoping that someone would know. Thanks anyway!
Actually, it might be a good idea to drop a line to Anniina Jokinen at
Luminarium. Her website page on British literature from the 14th to
18th centuries is one of the best of its kind on the web -- she has
done a tremendous amount of research to find the poems and articles
that grace it. Considering her area of specialization, she is the
person I can think of online most likely to have come across this poem
-- or at least to know of someone with the specialized knowledge that
you'd need in this case.

http://www.luminarium.org
Pennyaline
2012-02-16 02:23:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by George Dance
Actually, it might be a good idea to drop a line to Anniina Jokinen at
Luminarium. Her website page on British literature from the 14th to
18th centuries is one of the best of its kind on the web -- she has
done a tremendous amount of research to find the poems and articles
that grace it. Considering her area of specialization, she is the
person I can think of online most likely to have come across this poem
-- or at least to know of someone with the specialized knowledge that
you'd need in this case.
http://www.luminarium.org
Thanks so much. I appreciate that!
Will Dockery
2016-03-13 16:17:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Hieronymous Corey
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Hieronymous Corey
Post by Pennyaline
There is, somewhere out there, a poem from the metaphysical era that
sets the Garden of Eden as a jungle. I am looking for that poem and the
name of its author. Any ideas?
No, I have no idea which poem you mean. All of the so called
metaphysical poets wrote poems about the Garden of Eden though,
Marvell wrote The Garden, Treherne Eden, and so forth. The list of
metaphysical era English poets is relatively short. It shouldn't take
much time at all to go down the list one by one until you find the
poet and poem you're looking for. I wrote a poem titled The Garden Off
My Den about my own backyard but it's not metaphysical or anything.
It's neither Marvell nor Traherne. You're right, the list of
metaphysical poets is short, but I don't have the collected works of
each one at hand. If I had, I wouldn't be asking for help. Thanks
anyway, and if anyone does know, I'd appreciate it if you'd pass it this
way!
Good Hunting!
John Donne (1572-1631) http://www.luminarium.org/sevenlit/donne/donnebib.htm
George Herbert (1593-1633) http://www.luminarium.org/sevenlit/herbert/herbbib.htm
Andrew Marvell (1621-1678) http://www.luminarium.org/sevenlit/marvell/marvbib.htm
Saint Robert Southwell (c. 1561-1595) http://www.luminarium.org/renlit/southbib.htm
Richard Crashaw (c. 1613-1649) http://www.poemhunter.com/richard-crashaw/
Thomas Traherne (1636 or 1637 - 1674) http://www.poemhunter.com/thomas-traherne/
Henry Vaughan (1622-1695) http://www.poemhunter.com/henry-vaughan/
The following poets have also been sometimes considered metaphysical
George Chapman (c. 1559-1634) http://www.poemhunter.com/george-chapman/
Thomas Carew (1595-1640) http://www.poemhunter.com/thomas-carew/
Abraham Cowley (1618-1667) http://www.poemhunter.com/abraham-cowley/
Edward Herbert (1583-1648) http://www.luminarium.org/sevenlit/chirbury/chirbio.htm
Richard Leigh http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Leigh_(poet)
Katherine Philips (1632-1664), http://www.poemhunter.com/katherine-philips/
Sir John Suckling (1609-1642) http://www.poemhunter.com/sir-john-suckling/poems/
Edward Taylor (c. 1642-1729) http://www.poemhunter.com/edward-taylor/poems/
Anne Bradstreet (c. 1612-1672) http://www.annebradstreet.com/anne_bradstreet_poems.htm
John Wilmot, 2nd Earl of Rochester (1647-1680)
http://www.poemhunter.com/lord-john-wilmot/poems/
This listing and collection of links should be of great use to future seekers of all things Metaphysical.
Blackbeard
2019-03-07 05:38:27 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Post by Hieronymous Corey
Post by Pennyaline
Post by Hieronymous Corey
Post by Pennyaline
There is, somewhere out there, a poem from the metaphysical era that
sets the Garden of Eden as a jungle. I am looking for that poem and the
name of its author. Any ideas?
No, I have no idea which poem you mean. All of the so called
metaphysical poets wrote poems about the Garden of Eden though,
Marvell wrote The Garden, Treherne Eden, and so forth. The list of
metaphysical era English poets is relatively short. It shouldn't take
much time at all to go down the list one by one until you find the
poet and poem you're looking for. I wrote a poem titled The Garden Off
My Den about my own backyard but it's not metaphysical or anything.
It's neither Marvell nor Traherne. You're right, the list of
metaphysical poets is short, but I don't have the collected works of
each one at hand. If I had, I wouldn't be asking for help. Thanks
anyway, and if anyone does know, I'd appreciate it if you'd pass it this
way!
Good Hunting!
John Donne (1572-1631) http://www.luminarium.org/sevenlit/donne/donnebib.htm
George Herbert (1593-1633) http://www.luminarium.org/sevenlit/herbert/herbbib.htm
Andrew Marvell (1621-1678) http://www.luminarium.org/sevenlit/marvell/marvbib.htm
Saint Robert Southwell (c. 1561-1595) http://www.luminarium.org/renlit/southbib.htm
Richard Crashaw (c. 1613-1649) http://www.poemhunter.com/richard-crashaw/
Thomas Traherne (1636 or 1637 - 1674) http://www.poemhunter.com/thomas-traherne/
Henry Vaughan (1622-1695) http://www.poemhunter.com/henry-vaughan/
The following poets have also been sometimes considered metaphysical
George Chapman (c. 1559-1634) http://www.poemhunter.com/george-chapman/
Thomas Carew (1595-1640) http://www.poemhunter.com/thomas-carew/
Abraham Cowley (1618-1667) http://www.poemhunter.com/abraham-cowley/
Edward Herbert (1583-1648) http://www.luminarium.org/sevenlit/chirbury/chirbio.htm
Richard Leigh http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Leigh_(poet)
Katherine Philips (1632-1664), http://www.poemhunter.com/katherine-philips/
Sir John Suckling (1609-1642) http://www.poemhunter.com/sir-john-suckling/poems/
Edward Taylor (c. 1642-1729) http://www.poemhunter.com/edward-taylor/poems/
Anne Bradstreet (c. 1612-1672) http://www.annebradstreet.com/anne_bradstreet_poems.htm
John Wilmot, 2nd Earl of Rochester (1647-1680)
http://www.poemhunter.com/lord-john-wilmot/poems/
This listing and collection of links should be of great use to future seekers of all things Metaphysical.
Outstanding..........
Will Dockery
2016-02-17 04:33:25 UTC
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Post by Pennyaline
There is, somewhere out there, a poem from the metaphysical era that
sets the Garden of Eden as a jungle. I am looking for that poem and the
name of its author. Any ideas?
Nobody ever tracked this one down?
Will Dockery
2018-07-22 15:06:38 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Post by Hieronymous Corey
Post by Pennyaline
There is, somewhere out there, a poem from the metaphysical era that
sets the Garden of Eden as a jungle. I am looking for that poem and the
name of its author. Any ideas?
No, I have no idea which poem you mean. All of the so called
metaphysical poets wrote poems about the Garden of Eden though,
Marvell wrote The Garden, Treherne Eden, and so forth. The list of
metaphysical era English poets is relatively short. It shouldn't take
much time at all to go down the list one by one until you find the
poet and poem you're looking for. I wrote a poem titled The Garden Off
My Den about my own backyard but it's not metaphysical or anything.
I wrote "Grove of Mystery", which isn't the Garden of Eden or a jungle
but really a little bit of underbrush behind Books-A-Million on Macon
Road where the poetry reading folks used to sneak off to for private
moments before during and after the readings... that was way back in
http://groups.google.com/group/rec.arts.poems/msg/284b45b424059df4?hl=en
Grove Of Mystery
So many memories here,
in this grove of mystery.
Smoke floats gently, kind of sad,
big green and little Miss Olive,
green eyes impossibly unique.
We're down by law.
On this walkabout, hot, stoned, heartsick.
We all know this is the time to be wise,
when to hone and think on my feet.
Pieces of Eight vanish from Poseidon,
ninety percent law, ten percent water.
Passing through underground Shadowville,
heartbreaks as far as eye can see.
Lady Abi cooking in her tent,
shopping cart and umbrella,
behind the shut down International club.
She's plotting out miniscule facts,
and directions.
Love unconditionally,
the direction the heart must take.
In set adrift,
clear light in my eyes when I wake.
My heart's just not in it,
Raven is chained away in the infirmary.
Soul float through clouds,
enforced separation,
just a bunch of too much junkie buisness.
I's spellbound, now struck dumb.
In the lighted corridors,
the trees make shadows.
The cars and airplanes in a montage,
constantly changing and in motion.
Moon is good to have back,
if this was ever really true.
So many memories here,
in this grove of mystery.
-Will Dockery 5/25/99
--
http://www.reverbnation.com/willdockery
...
Bad Bad Leroy Brown
2018-12-28 22:33:49 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Post by Hieronymous Corey
Post by Pennyaline
There is, somewhere out there, a poem from the metaphysical era that
sets the Garden of Eden as a jungle. I am looking for that poem and the
name of its author. Any ideas?
No, I have no idea which poem you mean. All of the so called
metaphysical poets wrote poems about the Garden of Eden though,
Marvell wrote The Garden, Treherne Eden, and so forth. The list of
metaphysical era English poets is relatively short. It shouldn't take
much time at all to go down the list one by one until you find the
poet and poem you're looking for. I wrote a poem titled The Garden Off
My Den about my own backyard but it's not metaphysical or anything.
I wrote "Grove of Mystery", which isn't the Garden of Eden or a jungle
but really a little bit of underbrush behind Books-A-Million on Macon
Road where the poetry reading folks used to sneak off to for private
moments before during and after the readings... that was way back in
http://groups.google.com/group/rec.arts.poems/msg/284b45b424059df4?hl=en
Grove Of Mystery
So many memories here,
in this grove of mystery.
Smoke floats gently, kind of sad,
big green and little Miss Olive,
green eyes impossibly unique.
We're down by law.
On this walkabout, hot, stoned, heartsick.
We all know this is the time to be wise,
when to hone and think on my feet.
Pieces of Eight vanish from Poseidon,
ninety percent law, ten percent water.
Passing through underground Shadowville,
heartbreaks as far as eye can see.
Lady Abi cooking in her tent,
shopping cart and umbrella,
behind the shut down International club.
She's plotting out miniscule facts,
and directions.
Love unconditionally,
the direction the heart must take.
In set adrift,
clear light in my eyes when I wake.
My heart's just not in it,
Raven is chained away in the infirmary.
Soul float through clouds,
enforced separation,
just a bunch of too much junkie buisness.
I's spellbound, now struck dumb.
In the lighted corridors,
the trees make shadows.
The cars and airplanes in a montage,
constantly changing and in motion.
Moon is good to have back,
if this was ever really true.
So many memories here,
in this grove of mystery.
-Will Dockery 5/25/99
--
http://www.reverbnation.com/willdockery
...
Splendid and fabulous....................
Will Dockery
2018-07-23 03:58:01 UTC
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A sidebar on the "Karma Bombs" story, if anyone still cares...

😀
Mr. Spacey
2018-10-02 22:27:17 UTC
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Post by Pennyaline
There is, somewhere out there, a poem from the metaphysical era that
sets the Garden of Eden as a jungle. I am looking for that poem and the
name of its author. Any ideas?
I remember that poem almost.....................
Will Dockery
2018-10-15 08:19:33 UTC
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Illuminating investigation, folks.

:)
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