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This Old Cottage
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Antti
2020-06-24 10:36:51 UTC
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This Old Cottage


This old cottage
a survivor from 1930's.

Still standing on the rock
where it was built
on a distant another world.

Back when Hitler was burning books
here it stood.

The professor from Helsinki
taking a break
with his family.

On the doorway the names are written
with fading led, along with the year:

The 1940's featured strongly
as the bombs fell in Helsinki
here it stood.

The war ended, the people aged
the wooden beams were treated to stand the rain
again and again.

One family selling it to another.

50's - 60's - 70's
here it stood.

Through Vietnam war
computer revolution
and then there was me.

Hanging pike heads on a tree.

Now sitting in silence
looking back at my own life
and that of this old cottage.

If only we could treat our skin
and the insides would not rot
as the years go by
with the memories.

I listen to the crow
to the fly
to the distant neighbor
who does not realize how well his voice carries.

One day
this old cottage will stand
and my name will be;
on that doorway - just another memory
in a future that will be, what it will be.

--
Michael Pendragon
2020-06-24 14:03:39 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Antti
This Old Cottage
This old cottage
a survivor from 1930's.
Two fragments do not a sentence make.
Post by Antti
Still standing on the rock
where it was built
on a distant another world.
"Distant another" is gibberish. You can say "on a distant world" or you can say "on another world," but you cannot say "on a distant another world."
Post by Antti
Back when Hitler was burning books
here it stood.
"Here" connotes the present moment (as in "the here and now"). It should not be used in conjunction with past tense word forms ("Back when," "stood").
Post by Antti
The professor from Helsinki
taking a break
with his family.
This is not a sentence.

"The professor" is the subject. You have described the subject as being "from Helsinki" and as "taking a break with his family." Both, as used in your poem, serve as descriptions, not as verbs. EXAMPLE: The professor who was taking a break with his family *went to* the beach.
Post by Antti
On the doorway the names are written
The 1940's featured strongly
as the bombs fell in Helsinki
here it stood.
Two run-on strophes do not a sentence make.

I don't know what "led" means in Finnish, but it is not even remotely a writing implement in English.

The entire second strophe is pure gibberish. How does a decade "feature strongly" in an event?
Post by Antti
The war ended, the people aged
the wooden beams were treated to stand the rain
again and again.
Bravo! A sentence! The proverbial broken clock has struck!
Post by Antti
One family selling it to another.
This is not a sentence. "Selling" is used as a description, not as a verb.

You can say "One family sold it another," or you can say that "One family would sell it to another. But you cannot say "One family selling it another," because there is no verb.
Post by Antti
50's - 60's - 70's
here it stood.
This is not a sentence. The present tense, "here," again, is mismated with the past tense "stood."
Post by Antti
Through Vietnam war
This is an example of "Tarzan-speak." Civilized men and women say "Throughout the Vietnam war."
Post by Antti
computer revolution
and then there was me.
This strophe comprises three separate and unrelated fragments. Three fragments do not a sentence make.
Post by Antti
Hanging pike heads on a tree.
A pike head is either the head of a fish, or the end of a spear-like weapon. I can't imagine why anyone would be hanging either on a tree.

And, once again, you are writing in sentence fragments. This time you've left out the subject.

HINT: Once you end a "sentence" with a period, the subject of the finished "sentence" does not carry over to the following one.
Post by Antti
Now sitting in silence
looking back at my own life
and that of this old cottage.
Did you go to the same school as Will Dockery?

You've managed to leave both the subject and the verb out of this fragment.
Post by Antti
If only we could treat our skin
and the insides would not rot
as the years go by
with the memories.
I think you mean "so that our insides would not rot," but that's only an educated guess.
Post by Antti
I listen to the crow
to the fly
to the distant neighbor
who does not realize how well his voice carries.
The proverbial clock strikes a second time!
Post by Antti
One day
this old cottage will stand
and my name will be;
on that doorway - just another memory
in a future that will be, what it will be.
This is almost a sentence, although I cannot fathom what that semicolon is doing after be.

Once we get past the faulty English, we're left with a cliched thought (the house will outlive its occupants), that is expressed in cliched terms.
k***@gmail.com
2020-06-24 14:37:44 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Antti
This Old Cottage
This old cottage
a survivor from 1930's.
Two fragments do not a sentence make.
Just add "is" after cottage.
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Antti
Still standing on the rock
where it was built
on a distant another world.
"Distant another" is gibberish. You can say "on a distant world" or you can say "on another world," but you cannot say "on a distant another world."
Post by Antti
Back when Hitler was burning books
here it stood.
"Here" connotes the present moment (as in "the here and now"). It should not be used in conjunction with past tense word forms ("Back when," "stood").
Post by Antti
The professor from Helsinki
taking a break
with his family.
This is not a sentence.
"The professor" is the subject. You have described the subject as being "from Helsinki" and as "taking a break with his family." Both, as used in your poem, serve as descriptions, not as verbs. EXAMPLE: The professor who was taking a break with his family *went to* the beach.
Post by Antti
On the doorway the names are written
The 1940's featured strongly
as the bombs fell in Helsinki
here it stood.
Two run-on strophes do not a sentence make.
I don't know what "led" means in Finnish, but it is not even remotely a writing implement in English.
The entire second strophe is pure gibberish. How does a decade "feature strongly" in an event?
Post by Antti
The war ended, the people aged
the wooden beams were treated to stand the rain
again and again.
Bravo! A sentence! The proverbial broken clock has struck!
Post by Antti
One family selling it to another.
This is not a sentence. "Selling" is used as a description, not as a verb.
You can say "One family sold it another," or you can say that "One family would sell it to another. But you cannot say "One family selling it another," because there is no verb.
Post by Antti
50's - 60's - 70's
here it stood.
This is not a sentence. The present tense, "here," again, is mismated with the past tense "stood."
Post by Antti
Through Vietnam war
This is an example of "Tarzan-speak." Civilized men and women say "Throughout the Vietnam war."
Post by Antti
computer revolution
and then there was me.
This strophe comprises three separate and unrelated fragments. Three fragments do not a sentence make.
Post by Antti
Hanging pike heads on a tree.
A pike head is either the head of a fish, or the end of a spear-like weapon. I can't imagine why anyone would be hanging either on a tree.
And, once again, you are writing in sentence fragments. This time you've left out the subject.
HINT: Once you end a "sentence" with a period, the subject of the finished "sentence" does not carry over to the following one.
Post by Antti
Now sitting in silence
looking back at my own life
and that of this old cottage.
Did you go to the same school as Will Dockery?
You've managed to leave both the subject and the verb out of this fragment.
Post by Antti
If only we could treat our skin
and the insides would not rot
as the years go by
with the memories.
I think you mean "so that our insides would not rot," but that's only an educated guess.
Post by Antti
I listen to the crow
to the fly
to the distant neighbor
who does not realize how well his voice carries.
The proverbial clock strikes a second time!
Post by Antti
One day
this old cottage will stand
and my name will be;
on that doorway - just another memory
in a future that will be, what it will be.
This is almost a sentence, although I cannot fathom what that semicolon is doing after be.
Once we get past the faulty English, we're left with a cliched thought (the house will outlive its occupants), that is expressed in cliched terms.
English is Antti's second language. The poem definitely needs some help; it's a nice little bit of nostalgia, if a bit cliched. "led" probably refers to pencil marks. I've never heard of hanging fish heads from a tree, but it might be a custom elsewhere.
Antti
2020-06-24 15:01:25 UTC
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It was a weird thing I did as a kid.

My language skills are deterioriating. English faster than Finnish. My memory is getting worse too.

Antti
Will Dockery
2020-06-24 18:30:38 UTC
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Post by Antti
It was a weird thing I did as a kid.
My language skills are deterioriating. English faster than Finnish. My memory is getting worse too.
Antti
The poem is good, just needs some editing.

George Dance, are you out there?

;)
Michael Pendragon
2020-06-24 18:48:55 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Antti
It was a weird thing I did as a kid.
My language skills are deterioriating. English faster than Finnish. My memory is getting worse too.
Antti
The poem is good, just needs some editing.
George Dance, are you out there?
What's good about it, Will?

Please be specific. Thank you.
Will Dockery
2020-06-24 18:53:20 UTC
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Post by k***@gmail.com
English is Antti's second language. The poem definitely needs some help; it's a nice little bit of nostalgia, if a bit cliched. "led" probably refers to pencil marks. I've never heard of hanging fish heads from a tree, but it might be a custom elsewhere.
Sure, it needs a bit of editing, but the poem is a worthwhile read.
Michael Pendragon
2020-06-24 18:56:19 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Post by k***@gmail.com
English is Antti's second language. The poem definitely needs some help; it's a nice little bit of nostalgia, if a bit cliched. "led" probably refers to pencil marks. I've never heard of hanging fish heads from a tree, but it might be a custom elsewhere.
Sure, it needs a bit of editing, but the poem is a worthwhile read.
What, specifically, makes it a worthwhile read, Will?

Please be specific. Thank you.
Will Dockery
2020-06-25 03:33:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by k***@gmail.com
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Antti
This Old Cottage
This old cottage
a survivor from 1930's.
Two fragments do not a sentence make.
Just add "is" after cottage.
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Antti
Still standing on the rock
where it was built
on a distant another world.
"Distant another" is gibberish. You can say "on a distant world" or you can say "on another world," but you cannot say "on a distant another world."
Post by Antti
Back when Hitler was burning books
here it stood.
"Here" connotes the present moment (as in "the here and now"). It should not be used in conjunction with past tense word forms ("Back when," "stood").
Post by Antti
The professor from Helsinki
taking a break
with his family.
This is not a sentence.
"The professor" is the subject. You have described the subject as being "from Helsinki" and as "taking a break with his family." Both, as used in your poem, serve as descriptions, not as verbs. EXAMPLE: The professor who was taking a break with his family *went to* the beach.
Post by Antti
On the doorway the names are written
The 1940's featured strongly
as the bombs fell in Helsinki
here it stood.
Two run-on strophes do not a sentence make.
I don't know what "led" means in Finnish, but it is not even remotely a writing implement in English.
The entire second strophe is pure gibberish. How does a decade "feature strongly" in an event?
Post by Antti
The war ended, the people aged
the wooden beams were treated to stand the rain
again and again.
Bravo! A sentence! The proverbial broken clock has struck!
Post by Antti
One family selling it to another.
This is not a sentence. "Selling" is used as a description, not as a verb.
You can say "One family sold it another," or you can say that "One family would sell it to another. But you cannot say "One family selling it another," because there is no verb.
Post by Antti
50's - 60's - 70's
here it stood.
This is not a sentence. The present tense, "here," again, is mismated with the past tense "stood."
Post by Antti
Through Vietnam war
This is an example of "Tarzan-speak." Civilized men and women say "Throughout the Vietnam war."
Post by Antti
computer revolution
and then there was me.
This strophe comprises three separate and unrelated fragments. Three fragments do not a sentence make.
Post by Antti
Hanging pike heads on a tree.
A pike head is either the head of a fish, or the end of a spear-like weapon. I can't imagine why anyone would be hanging either on a tree.
And, once again, you are writing in sentence fragments. This time you've left out the subject.
HINT: Once you end a "sentence" with a period, the subject of the finished "sentence" does not carry over to the following one.
Post by Antti
Now sitting in silence
looking back at my own life
and that of this old cottage.
Did you go to the same school as Will Dockery?
You've managed to leave both the subject and the verb out of this fragment.
Post by Antti
If only we could treat our skin
and the insides would not rot
as the years go by
with the memories.
I think you mean "so that our insides would not rot," but that's only an educated guess.
Post by Antti
I listen to the crow
to the fly
to the distant neighbor
who does not realize how well his voice carries.
The proverbial clock strikes a second time!
Post by Antti
One day
this old cottage will stand
and my name will be;
on that doorway - just another memory
in a future that will be, what it will be.
This is almost a sentence, although I cannot fathom what that semicolon is doing after be.
Once we get past the faulty English, we're left with a cliched thought (the house will outlive its occupants), that is expressed in cliched terms.
English is Antti's second language. The poem definitely needs some help; it's a nice little bit of nostalgia, if a bit cliched. "led" probably refers to pencil marks. I've never heard of hanging fish heads from a tree, but it might be a custom elsewhere.
I think Antti could probably get a pretty good poem just in describing the "fish heads hanging from a tree" custom.
Michael Pendragon
2020-06-25 05:43:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by k***@gmail.com
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Antti
This Old Cottage
This old cottage
a survivor from 1930's.
Two fragments do not a sentence make.
Just add "is" after cottage.
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Antti
Still standing on the rock
where it was built
on a distant another world.
"Distant another" is gibberish. You can say "on a distant world" or you can say "on another world," but you cannot say "on a distant another world."
Post by Antti
Back when Hitler was burning books
here it stood.
"Here" connotes the present moment (as in "the here and now"). It should not be used in conjunction with past tense word forms ("Back when," "stood").
Post by Antti
The professor from Helsinki
taking a break
with his family.
This is not a sentence.
"The professor" is the subject. You have described the subject as being "from Helsinki" and as "taking a break with his family." Both, as used in your poem, serve as descriptions, not as verbs. EXAMPLE: The professor who was taking a break with his family *went to* the beach.
Post by Antti
On the doorway the names are written
The 1940's featured strongly
as the bombs fell in Helsinki
here it stood.
Two run-on strophes do not a sentence make.
I don't know what "led" means in Finnish, but it is not even remotely a writing implement in English.
The entire second strophe is pure gibberish. How does a decade "feature strongly" in an event?
Post by Antti
The war ended, the people aged
the wooden beams were treated to stand the rain
again and again.
Bravo! A sentence! The proverbial broken clock has struck!
Post by Antti
One family selling it to another.
This is not a sentence. "Selling" is used as a description, not as a verb.
You can say "One family sold it another," or you can say that "One family would sell it to another. But you cannot say "One family selling it another," because there is no verb.
Post by Antti
50's - 60's - 70's
here it stood.
This is not a sentence. The present tense, "here," again, is mismated with the past tense "stood."
Post by Antti
Through Vietnam war
This is an example of "Tarzan-speak." Civilized men and women say "Throughout the Vietnam war."
Post by Antti
computer revolution
and then there was me.
This strophe comprises three separate and unrelated fragments. Three fragments do not a sentence make.
Post by Antti
Hanging pike heads on a tree.
A pike head is either the head of a fish, or the end of a spear-like weapon. I can't imagine why anyone would be hanging either on a tree.
And, once again, you are writing in sentence fragments. This time you've left out the subject.
HINT: Once you end a "sentence" with a period, the subject of the finished "sentence" does not carry over to the following one.
Post by Antti
Now sitting in silence
looking back at my own life
and that of this old cottage.
Did you go to the same school as Will Dockery?
You've managed to leave both the subject and the verb out of this fragment.
Post by Antti
If only we could treat our skin
and the insides would not rot
as the years go by
with the memories.
I think you mean "so that our insides would not rot," but that's only an educated guess.
Post by Antti
I listen to the crow
to the fly
to the distant neighbor
who does not realize how well his voice carries.
The proverbial clock strikes a second time!
Post by Antti
One day
this old cottage will stand
and my name will be;
on that doorway - just another memory
in a future that will be, what it will be.
This is almost a sentence, although I cannot fathom what that semicolon is doing after be.
Once we get past the faulty English, we're left with a cliched thought (the house will outlive its occupants), that is expressed in cliched terms.
English is Antti's second language. The poem definitely needs some help; it's a nice little bit of nostalgia, if a bit cliched. "led" probably refers to pencil marks. I've never heard of hanging fish heads from a tree, but it might be a custom elsewhere.
I think Antti could probably get a pretty good poem just in describing the "fish heads hanging from a tree" custom.
1) It's not a Finnish custom; it's something Antti did when he was a boy.

2) Such a poem would be too similar to "Dead Cats" (about the dead cats hanging from the infamous "Pussy Willow" tree in Australia).
Peter J Ross
2020-06-27 00:16:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
In alt.arts.poetry.comments on Wed, 24 Jun 2020 07:37:44 -0700 (PDT),
Post by k***@gmail.com
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Antti
This Old Cottage
This old cottage
a survivor from 1930's.
Two fragments do not a sentence make.
Just add "is" after cottage.
But a "the" would still be missing.

<...>
Post by k***@gmail.com
English is Antti's second language.
But Antti's English prose is nowhere near as bad as his English verse.
He shares with thousands of native speakers of English the delusion
that poetry differs from prose in including the kind of bad grammar
and bad syntax that even the author would laugh at if it were included
in a passage of prose.
--
PJR :-)

μεγάλη ἡ ἀλήθεια καὶ ὑπερισχύει.
- Esdras A 4.41
ME
2020-06-27 00:23:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter J Ross
In alt.arts.poetry.comments on Wed, 24 Jun 2020 07:37:44 -0700 (PDT),
ktel
Post by k***@gmail.com
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Antti
This Old Cottage
This old cottage
a survivor from 1930's.
Two fragments do not a sentence make.
Just add "is" after cottage.
But a "the" would still be missing.
<...>
Post by k***@gmail.com
English is Antti's second language.
But Antti's English prose is nowhere near as bad as his English verse.
He shares with thousands of native speakers of English the delusion
that poetry differs from prose in including the kind of bad grammar
and bad syntax that even the author would laugh at if it were included
in a passage of prose.
--
PJR :-)
μεγάλη ἡ ἀλήθεια καὶ ὑπερισχύει.
- Esdras A 4.41
Pjr, you give Antti way too much credit.
NancyGene
2020-06-27 00:29:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by ME
Post by Peter J Ross
In alt.arts.poetry.comments on Wed, 24 Jun 2020 07:37:44 -0700 (PDT),
ktel
Post by k***@gmail.com
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Antti
This Old Cottage
This old cottage
a survivor from 1930's.
Two fragments do not a sentence make.
Just add "is" after cottage.
But a "the" would still be missing.
<...>
Post by k***@gmail.com
English is Antti's second language.
But Antti's English prose is nowhere near as bad as his English verse.
He shares with thousands of native speakers of English the delusion
that poetry differs from prose in including the kind of bad grammar
and bad syntax that even the author would laugh at if it were included
in a passage of prose.
--
PJR :-)
μεγάλη ἡ ἀλήθεια καὶ ὑπερισχύει.
- Esdras A 4.41
Pjr, you give Antti way too much credit.
What we paused at is Will's claim (again) that he plays the guitar. "This one was actually one of my early songs, recordings exist of this and others with P.D. Wilson on flute and me on acoustic guitar."
Will Dockery
2020-06-27 19:09:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by NancyGene
Post by ME
Post by Peter J Ross
In alt.arts.poetry.comments on Wed, 24 Jun 2020 07:37:44 -0700 (PDT),
Post by k***@gmail.com
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Antti
This Old Cottage
This old cottage
a survivor from 1930's.
Two fragments do not a sentence make.
Just add "is" after cottage.
But a "the" would still be missing.
<...>
Post by k***@gmail.com
English is Antti's second language.
But Antti's English prose is nowhere near as bad as his English verse.
He shares with thousands of native speakers of English the delusion
that poetry differs from prose in including the kind of bad grammar
and bad syntax that even the author would laugh at if it were included
in a passage of prose.
--
PJR :-)
μεγάλη ἡ ἀλήθεια καὶ ὑπερισχύει.
- Esdras A 4.41
Pjr, you give Antti way too much credit.
What we paused at is Will's claim (again) that he plays the guitar. "This one was actually one of my early songs, recordings exist of this and others with P.D. Wilson on flute and me on acoustic guitar."
I play both guitar and piano... not very good, though.

;)
Michael Pendragon
2020-06-27 19:12:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by NancyGene
Post by ME
Post by Peter J Ross
In alt.arts.poetry.comments on Wed, 24 Jun 2020 07:37:44 -0700 (PDT),
Post by k***@gmail.com
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Antti
This Old Cottage
This old cottage
a survivor from 1930's.
Two fragments do not a sentence make.
Just add "is" after cottage.
But a "the" would still be missing.
<...>
Post by k***@gmail.com
English is Antti's second language.
But Antti's English prose is nowhere near as bad as his English verse.
He shares with thousands of native speakers of English the delusion
that poetry differs from prose in including the kind of bad grammar
and bad syntax that even the author would laugh at if it were included
in a passage of prose.
--
PJR :-)
μεγάλη ἡ ἀλήθεια καὶ ὑπερισχύει.
- Esdras A 4.41
Pjr, you give Antti way too much credit.
What we paused at is Will's claim (again) that he plays the guitar. "This one was actually one of my early songs, recordings exist of this and others with P.D. Wilson on flute and me on acoustic guitar."
I play both guitar and piano... not very good, though.
You also don't write very well.

[HINT: Focus on the final word in my sentence, and see if you can figure out where you made your mistake.]
Will Dockery
2020-06-27 19:15:11 UTC
Reply
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Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Peter J Ross
In alt.arts.poetry.comments on Wed, 24 Jun 2020 07:37:44 -0700 (PDT),
Post by ME
Post by Peter J Ross
Post by k***@gmail.com
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Antti
This Old Cottage
This old cottage
a survivor from 1930's.
Two fragments do not a sentence make.
Just add "is" after cottage.
But a "the" would still be missing.
<...>
Post by k***@gmail.com
English is Antti's second language.
But Antti's English prose is nowhere near as bad as his English verse.
He shares with thousands of native speakers of English the delusion
that poetry differs from prose in including the kind of bad grammar
and bad syntax that even the author would laugh at if it were included
in a passage of prose.
--
PJR :-)
μεγάλη ἡ ἀλήθεια καὶ ὑπερισχύει.
- Esdras A 4.41
Pjr, you give Antti way too much credit.
What we paused at is Will's claim (again) that he plays the guitar. "This one was actually one of my early songs, recordings exist of this and others with P.D. Wilson on flute and me on acoustic guitar."
I play both guitar and piano... not very good, though.
You also don't write very well.
[HINT: Focus on the final word in my sentence, and see if you can figure out where you made your mistake.]
Okay, thanks for the correction.

;)
Will Dockery
2020-07-04 10:37:18 UTC
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Post by Michael Pendragon
You also don't write very well
<snip>

Again, again with your lack of understanding/appreciation of the best of modern poetry, your judgement is worthless to me:

https://groups.google.com/d/msg/alt.arts.poetry.comments/49a7-W02I0E/ydzf1mrlCgAJ

"I'd simply burn the garbage churned out by no-talent phonies like Bukowski, Kerouac and Ginsberg." -Michael Pendragon

HTH & HAND.
ME
2020-07-04 11:44:14 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
You also don't write very well
<snip>
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/alt.arts.poetry.comments/49a7-W02I0E/ydzf1mrlCgAJ
"I'd simply burn the garbage churned out by no-talent phonies like Bukowski, Kerouac and Ginsberg." -Michael Pendragon
HTH & HAND.
Will, your mistaken claim that Michael doesn’t understand or knows what modern poetry is ludicrous.
As Karen has pointed out to you, Michael has studied modern poetry in college and is an editor of poetry. How many college courses on poetry have you taken?
So don’t make that statement again.
Will Dockery
2020-07-04 12:06:35 UTC
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Post by ME
Michael doesn’t understand or knows what modern poetry is
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/alt.arts.poetry.comments/49a7-W02I0E/ydzf1mrlCgAJ

"I'd simply burn the garbage churned out by no-talent phonies like Bukowski, Kerouac and Ginsberg." -Michael Pendragon

His statement above proves my point for me.

;)
ME
2020-07-04 12:09:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by ME
Michael doesn’t understand or knows what modern poetry is
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/alt.arts.poetry.comments/49a7-W02I0E/ydzf1mrlCgAJ
"I'd simply burn the garbage churned out by no-talent phonies like Bukowski, Kerouac and Ginsberg." -Michael Pendragon
His statement above proves my point for me.
;)
He doesn’t like those poets. That’s his prerogative.
Will Dockery
2020-07-04 12:16:38 UTC
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Post by ME
Post by Will Dockery
Post by ME
Michael doesn’t understand or knows what modern poetry is
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/alt.arts.poetry.comments/49a7-W02I0E/ydzf1mrlCgAJ
"I'd simply burn the garbage churned out by no-talent phonies like Bukowski, Kerouac and Ginsberg." -Michael Pendragon
His statement above proves my point for me.
;)
He doesn’t like those poets
Right, he doesn't understand/appreciate modern poetry, since those three poets named above, Charles Bukowski, Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg, are widely known as three of the best poets of the 20th Century.

Look it up.

;)
ME
2020-07-04 12:48:26 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Post by ME
Post by Will Dockery
Post by ME
Michael doesn’t understand or knows what modern poetry is
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/alt.arts.poetry.comments/49a7-W02I0E/ydzf1mrlCgAJ
"I'd simply burn the garbage churned out by no-talent phonies like Bukowski, Kerouac and Ginsberg." -Michael Pendragon
His statement above proves my point for me.
;)
He doesn’t like those poets
Right, he doesn't understand/appreciate modern poetry, since those three poets named above, Charles Bukowski, Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg, are widely known as three of the best poets of the 20th Century.
Look it up.
;)
Maybe in your world they are. But not everyone believes that, will.
Van (Van Couver)
2020-07-02 23:44:58 UTC
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Post by k***@gmail.com
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Antti
This Old Cottage
This old cottage
a survivor from 1930's.
Two fragments do not a sentence make.
Just add "is" after cottage.
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Antti
Still standing on the rock
where it was built
on a distant another world.
"Distant another" is gibberish. You can say "on a distant world" or you can say "on another world," but you cannot say "on a distant another world."
Post by Antti
Back when Hitler was burning books
here it stood.
"Here" connotes the present moment (as in "the here and now"). It should not be used in conjunction with past tense word forms ("Back when," "stood").
Post by Antti
The professor from Helsinki
taking a break
with his family.
This is not a sentence.
"The professor" is the subject. You have described the subject as being "from Helsinki" and as "taking a break with his family." Both, as used in your poem, serve as descriptions, not as verbs. EXAMPLE: The professor who was taking a break with his family *went to* the beach.
Post by Antti
On the doorway the names are written
The 1940's featured strongly
as the bombs fell in Helsinki
here it stood.
Two run-on strophes do not a sentence make.
I don't know what "led" means in Finnish, but it is not even remotely a writing implement in English.
The entire second strophe is pure gibberish. How does a decade "feature strongly" in an event?
Post by Antti
The war ended, the people aged
the wooden beams were treated to stand the rain
again and again.
Bravo! A sentence! The proverbial broken clock has struck!
Post by Antti
One family selling it to another.
This is not a sentence. "Selling" is used as a description, not as a verb.
You can say "One family sold it another," or you can say that "One family would sell it to another. But you cannot say "One family selling it another," because there is no verb.
Post by Antti
50's - 60's - 70's
here it stood.
This is not a sentence. The present tense, "here," again, is mismated with the past tense "stood."
Post by Antti
Through Vietnam war
This is an example of "Tarzan-speak." Civilized men and women say "Throughout the Vietnam war."
Post by Antti
computer revolution
and then there was me.
This strophe comprises three separate and unrelated fragments. Three fragments do not a sentence make.
Post by Antti
Hanging pike heads on a tree.
A pike head is either the head of a fish, or the end of a spear-like weapon. I can't imagine why anyone would be hanging either on a tree.
And, once again, you are writing in sentence fragments. This time you've left out the subject.
HINT: Once you end a "sentence" with a period, the subject of the finished "sentence" does not carry over to the following one.
Post by Antti
Now sitting in silence
looking back at my own life
and that of this old cottage.
Did you go to the same school as Will Dockery?
You've managed to leave both the subject and the verb out of this fragment.
Post by Antti
If only we could treat our skin
and the insides would not rot
as the years go by
with the memories.
I think you mean "so that our insides would not rot," but that's only an educated guess.
Post by Antti
I listen to the crow
to the fly
to the distant neighbor
who does not realize how well his voice carries.
The proverbial clock strikes a second time!
Post by Antti
One day
this old cottage will stand
and my name will be;
on that doorway - just another memory
in a future that will be, what it will be.
This is almost a sentence, although I cannot fathom what that semicolon is doing after be.
Once we get past the faulty English, we're left with a cliched thought (the house will outlive its occupants), that is expressed in cliched terms.
English is Antti's second language. The poem definitely needs some help; it's a nice little bit of nostalgia, if a bit cliched. "led" probably refers to pencil marks. I've never heard of hanging fish heads from a tree, but it might be a custom elsewhere.
Interesting read.....
Sherwood
2020-07-06 00:27:38 UTC
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A favorite from Antti...
Sherwood
2020-07-04 00:21:50 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Antti
This Old Cottage
This old cottage
a survivor from 1930's.
Two fragments do not a sentence make.
Post by Antti
Still standing on the rock
where it was built
on a distant another world.
"Distant another" is gibberish. You can say "on a distant world" or you can say "on another world," but you cannot say "on a distant another world."
Post by Antti
Back when Hitler was burning books
here it stood.
"Here" connotes the present moment (as in "the here and now"). It should not be used in conjunction with past tense word forms ("Back when," "stood")..
Post by Antti
The professor from Helsinki
taking a break
with his family.
This is not a sentence.
"The professor" is the subject. You have described the subject as being "from Helsinki" and as "taking a break with his family." Both, as used in your poem, serve as descriptions, not as verbs. EXAMPLE: The professor who was taking a break with his family *went to* the beach.
Post by Antti
On the doorway the names are written
The 1940's featured strongly
as the bombs fell in Helsinki
here it stood.
Two run-on strophes do not a sentence make.
I don't know what "led" means in Finnish, but it is not even remotely a writing implement in English.
The entire second strophe is pure gibberish. How does a decade "feature strongly" in an event?
Post by Antti
The war ended, the people aged
the wooden beams were treated to stand the rain
again and again.
Bravo! A sentence! The proverbial broken clock has struck!
Post by Antti
One family selling it to another.
This is not a sentence. "Selling" is used as a description, not as a verb.
You can say "One family sold it another," or you can say that "One family would sell it to another. But you cannot say "One family selling it another," because there is no verb.
Post by Antti
50's - 60's - 70's
here it stood.
This is not a sentence. The present tense, "here," again, is mismated with the past tense "stood."
Post by Antti
Through Vietnam war
This is an example of "Tarzan-speak." Civilized men and women say "Throughout the Vietnam war."
Post by Antti
computer revolution
and then there was me.
This strophe comprises three separate and unrelated fragments. Three fragments do not a sentence make.
Post by Antti
Hanging pike heads on a tree.
A pike head is either the head of a fish, or the end of a spear-like weapon.. I can't imagine why anyone would be hanging either on a tree.
And, once again, you are writing in sentence fragments. This time you've left out the subject.
HINT: Once you end a "sentence" with a period, the subject of the finished "sentence" does not carry over to the following one.
Post by Antti
Now sitting in silence
looking back at my own life
and that of this old cottage.
Did you go to the same school as Will Dockery?
You've managed to leave both the subject and the verb out of this fragment.
Post by Antti
If only we could treat our skin
and the insides would not rot
as the years go by
with the memories.
I think you mean "so that our insides would not rot," but that's only an educated guess.
Post by Antti
I listen to the crow
to the fly
to the distant neighbor
who does not realize how well his voice carries.
The proverbial clock strikes a second time!
Post by Antti
One day
this old cottage will stand
and my name will be;
on that doorway - just another memory
in a future that will be, what it will be.
This is almost a sentence, although I cannot fathom what that semicolon is doing after be.
Once we get past the faulty English, we're left with a cliched thought (the house will outlive its occupants), that is expressed in cliched terms.
Pen is obviously clueless again...
Michael Pendragon
2020-07-04 03:30:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Sherwood
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Antti
This Old Cottage
This old cottage
a survivor from 1930's.
Two fragments do not a sentence make.
Post by Antti
Still standing on the rock
where it was built
on a distant another world.
"Distant another" is gibberish. You can say "on a distant world" or you can say "on another world," but you cannot say "on a distant another world."
Post by Antti
Back when Hitler was burning books
here it stood.
"Here" connotes the present moment (as in "the here and now"). It should not be used in conjunction with past tense word forms ("Back when," "stood")..
Post by Antti
The professor from Helsinki
taking a break
with his family.
This is not a sentence.
"The professor" is the subject. You have described the subject as being "from Helsinki" and as "taking a break with his family." Both, as used in your poem, serve as descriptions, not as verbs. EXAMPLE: The professor who was taking a break with his family *went to* the beach.
Post by Antti
On the doorway the names are written
The 1940's featured strongly
as the bombs fell in Helsinki
here it stood.
Two run-on strophes do not a sentence make.
I don't know what "led" means in Finnish, but it is not even remotely a writing implement in English.
The entire second strophe is pure gibberish. How does a decade "feature strongly" in an event?
Post by Antti
The war ended, the people aged
the wooden beams were treated to stand the rain
again and again.
Bravo! A sentence! The proverbial broken clock has struck!
Post by Antti
One family selling it to another.
This is not a sentence. "Selling" is used as a description, not as a verb.
You can say "One family sold it another," or you can say that "One family would sell it to another. But you cannot say "One family selling it another," because there is no verb.
Post by Antti
50's - 60's - 70's
here it stood.
This is not a sentence. The present tense, "here," again, is mismated with the past tense "stood."
Post by Antti
Through Vietnam war
This is an example of "Tarzan-speak." Civilized men and women say "Throughout the Vietnam war."
Post by Antti
computer revolution
and then there was me.
This strophe comprises three separate and unrelated fragments. Three fragments do not a sentence make.
Post by Antti
Hanging pike heads on a tree.
A pike head is either the head of a fish, or the end of a spear-like weapon.. I can't imagine why anyone would be hanging either on a tree.
And, once again, you are writing in sentence fragments. This time you've left out the subject.
HINT: Once you end a "sentence" with a period, the subject of the finished "sentence" does not carry over to the following one.
Post by Antti
Now sitting in silence
looking back at my own life
and that of this old cottage.
Did you go to the same school as Will Dockery?
You've managed to leave both the subject and the verb out of this fragment.
Post by Antti
If only we could treat our skin
and the insides would not rot
as the years go by
with the memories.
I think you mean "so that our insides would not rot," but that's only an educated guess.
Post by Antti
I listen to the crow
to the fly
to the distant neighbor
who does not realize how well his voice carries.
The proverbial clock strikes a second time!
Post by Antti
One day
this old cottage will stand
and my name will be;
on that doorway - just another memory
in a future that will be, what it will be.
This is almost a sentence, although I cannot fathom what that semicolon is doing after be.
Once we get past the faulty English, we're left with a cliched thought (the house will outlive its occupants), that is expressed in cliched terms.
Pen is obviously clueless again...
Then tell us what you think it all means, Stink.
Will Dockery
2020-07-04 03:37:09 UTC
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Post by Michael Pendragon
Then tell us what you think it all means
I'll tell you:

It is a poem about Antti's house, and pretty good poetry, at that.

;)
Michael Pendragon
2020-07-04 03:44:50 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Then tell us what you think it all means
It is a poem about Antti's house, and pretty good poetry, at that.
And, since I'd said that it was a poem about a house, Will. How does your explanation add anything to mine?

All that you've done is to specify that it was Antti's house -- conveniently forgetting Karla's Rule in the process.
Will Dockery
2020-07-04 04:03:58 UTC
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Post by Michael Pendragon
How does your explanation add anything to mine?
Like you with Bukowski, Kerouac and Ginsberg... I try not to read your garbage.

;)
Michael Pendragon
2020-07-04 04:35:30 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
How does your explanation add anything to mine?
Like you with Bukowski, Kerouac and Ginsberg... I try not to read your garbage.
RECAP:

MMP: Once we get past the faulty English, we're left with a cliched thought (the house will outlive its occupants), that is expressed in cliched terms.

STINK: Pen is obviously clueless again...

MMP: Then tell us what you think it all means, Stink.

WILL: I'll tell you: It is a poem about Antti's house, and pretty good poetry, at that.

***

Now that you've been brought up to speed, let's see if you can answer my question.
Will Dockery
2020-07-04 04:55:18 UTC
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RECAP
As I wrote earlier, like you with Bukowski, Kerouac and Ginsberg... I try not to read your garbage, Pendragon.

So spare me.

;)
Michael Pendragon
2020-07-04 05:27:18 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
RECAP
As I wrote earlier, like you with Bukowski, Kerouac and Ginsberg... I try not to read your garbage, Pendragon.
So spare me.
You responded to my post, Will. (And I had addressed it to Stink.)
Will Dockery
2020-07-04 05:34:13 UTC
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Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
As I wrote earlier, like you with Bukowski, Kerouac and Ginsberg... I try not to read your garbage, Pendragon.
So spare me.
You responded
Why not, nothing better to do, right?

;)
Michael Pendragon
2020-07-04 05:39:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
As I wrote earlier, like you with Bukowski, Kerouac and Ginsberg... I try not to read your garbage, Pendragon.
So spare me.
You responded
Why not, nothing better to do, right?
Please explain how you can possibly have responded to my post without first having read it.
Will Dockery
2020-07-04 05:46:03 UTC
Reply
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Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
As I wrote earlier, like you with Bukowski, Kerouac and Ginsberg... I try not to read your garbage, Pendragon.
So spare me.
You responded
Why not, nothing better to do, right?
Please explain how you can possibly have responded to my post without first having read it.
I wrote that, like you with Bukowski, Kerouac and Ginsberg... I /try/ not to read your garbage, Pendragon.

;)
k***@gmail.com
2020-07-04 13:14:57 UTC
Reply
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Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
As I wrote earlier, like you with Bukowski, Kerouac and Ginsberg... I try not to read your garbage, Pendragon.
So spare me.
You responded
Why not, nothing better to do, right?
Please explain how you can possibly have responded to my post without first having read it.
I wrote that, like you with Bukowski, Kerouac and Ginsberg... I /try/ not to read your garbage, Pendragon.
;)
I like Michael's poetry. I sometimes like your poetry; it's very imagistic, but often I think your work could be more disciplined.

Michael is entitled to his opinion concerning the Beats.
Will Dockery
2020-07-05 17:25:41 UTC
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Post by k***@gmail.com
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
As I wrote earlier, like you with Bukowski, Kerouac and Ginsberg... I try not to read your garbage, Pendragon.
So spare me.
You responded
Why not, nothing better to do, right?
Please explain how you can possibly have responded to my post without first having read it.
I wrote that, like you with Bukowski, Kerouac and Ginsberg... I /try/ not to read your garbage, Pendragon.
;)
I like Michael's poetry. I sometimes like your poetry; it's very imagistic, but often I think your work could be more disciplined.
Michael is entitled to his opinion concerning the Beats.
He's not just clueless about the Beats, though.

;)
ME
2020-07-05 18:04:56 UTC
Reply
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Post by k***@gmail.com
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
As I wrote earlier, like you with Bukowski, Kerouac and Ginsberg... I try not to read your garbage, Pendragon.
So spare me.
You responded
Why not, nothing better to do, right?
Please explain how you can possibly have responded to my post without first having read it.
I wrote that, like you with Bukowski, Kerouac and Ginsberg... I /try/ not to read your garbage, Pendragon.
;)
I like Michael's poetry. I sometimes like your poetry; it's very imagistic, but often I think your work could be more disciplined.
Michael is entitled to his opinion concerning the Beats.
He's not clueless about the Beats, though.
;)
Thank you for finally admitting that will!!
Kudos.
Will Dockery
2020-07-05 21:21:17 UTC
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Post by ME
Post by Will Dockery
Post by k***@gmail.com
Post by Will Dockery
I wrote that, like you with Bukowski, Kerouac and Ginsberg... I /try/ not to read your garbage, Pendragon.
I like Michael's poetry. I sometimes like your poetry; it's very imagistic, but often I think your work could be more disciplined.
Michael is entitled to his opinion concerning the Beats.
He's not just clueless about the Beats, though.
Thank you for finally admitting that will!!
Kudos.
No, he's clueless about quite a few poets, Emily Dickinson and Bob Dylan, to name two more.

;)
Michael Pendragon
2020-07-05 22:26:38 UTC
Reply
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Post by Will Dockery
Post by ME
Post by Will Dockery
Post by k***@gmail.com
Post by Will Dockery
I wrote that, like you with Bukowski, Kerouac and Ginsberg... I /try/ not to read your garbage, Pendragon.
I like Michael's poetry. I sometimes like your poetry; it's very imagistic, but often I think your work could be more disciplined.
Michael is entitled to his opinion concerning the Beats.
He's not just clueless about the Beats, though.
Thank you for finally admitting that will!!
Kudos.
No, he's clueless about quite a few poets, Emily Dickinson and Bob Dylan, to name two more.
I've read the complete Dickinson, Will. If you want to discuss her poetry, I'll take you own any time.

As to Bob Dylan: he's a folk rock singer/composer.

Song lyrics can rarely stand on their own as poetry and his are no exception.
Will Dockery
2020-07-05 22:46:44 UTC
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Post by Michael Pendragon
As to Bob Dylan: he's a folk rock singer/composer.
"Dylan was awarded the 2016 Nobel Prize in Literature on October 13, 2016, for having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition..."

:)
Michael Pendragon
2020-07-05 22:49:27 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
As to Bob Dylan: he's a folk rock singer/composer.
"Dylan was awarded the 2016 Nobel Prize in Literature on October 13, 2016, for having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition..."
Do you understand what the phrase "within the great American song tradition" means, Will? (He asked rhetorically.)

HINT: The operative word is "within."

ANSWER: His songs contain poetic qualities.

That doesn't transform them into poetry. It simply means that they are poetic SONGS.
Will Dockery
2020-07-05 23:00:47 UTC
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Song lyrics are poetry, though.

:)
Michael Pendragon
2020-07-06 03:41:15 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Song lyrics are poetry, though.
They are differentiated from song lyrics in the quote you've provided for a reason, Will.

Song lyrics and poetry are both forms of *writing.*

Sometimes a poem can be set to music.

Sometimes a song lyric can stand alone as a written poem.

However, in the vast majority of the cases, they cannot.

You need to learn how to differentiate between the two.
Will Dockery
2020-07-06 03:52:17 UTC
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Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Song lyrics are poetry, though.
They are differentiated from song lyrics in the quote you've provided for a reason, Will.
Song lyrics and poetry are both forms of *writing.*
Sometimes a poem can be set to music.
Sometimes a song lyric can stand alone as a written poem.
However, in the vast majority of the cases, they cannot.
You need to learn how to differentiate between the two.
Dylan's lyrics are agreed to make the grade as poetry by the majority, including those giving out the Nobel Prize.

;)
Michael Pendragon
2020-07-06 03:56:16 UTC
Reply
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Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Song lyrics are poetry, though.
They are differentiated from song lyrics in the quote you've provided for a reason, Will.
Song lyrics and poetry are both forms of *writing.*
Sometimes a poem can be set to music.
Sometimes a song lyric can stand alone as a written poem.
However, in the vast majority of the cases, they cannot.
You need to learn how to differentiate between the two.
Dylan's lyrics are agreed to make the grade as poetry by the majority, including those giving out the Nobel Prize.
That isn't true, Will. The quote you'd posted made it abundantly clear that the Nobel Prize had been awarded for the poetic qualities of his *MUSIC.*
Will Dockery
2020-07-06 04:10:57 UTC
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Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Dylan's lyrics are agreed to make the grade as poetry by the majority, including those giving out the Nobel Prize.
That isn't true, Will. The quote you'd posted made it abundantly clear that the Nobel Prize had been awarded for the poetic qualities of his *MUSIC.*
No, the Nobel Prize was in Literature.
Michael Pendragon
2020-07-06 04:13:07 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Dylan's lyrics are agreed to make the grade as poetry by the majority, including those giving out the Nobel Prize.
That isn't true, Will. The quote you'd posted made it abundantly clear that the Nobel Prize had been awarded for the poetic qualities of his *MUSIC.*
No, the Nobel Prize was in Literature.
Here again is the quote that you'd posted:

"Dylan was awarded the 2016 Nobel Prize in Literature on October 13, 2016, for having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition..."

It clearly specifies that he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature for the poetic qualities of his music.
Will Dockery
2020-07-06 04:16:33 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
"Dylan was awarded the 2016 Nobel Prize in Literature on October 13, 2016, for having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition..."
It clearly specifies that he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature for the poetic qualities of his music.
His lyrics aka poetry.
Michael Pendragon
2020-07-06 04:19:39 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
"Dylan was awarded the 2016 Nobel Prize in Literature on October 13, 2016, for having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition..."
It clearly specifies that he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature for the poetic qualities of his music.
His lyrics aka poetry.
Your lack of reading comprehension is pitiable.

The quote implies that his lyrics are "poetic."

"Poetic" is not a synonym for "poetry."

Learn the language.

"Dictionaries are over-rated. I use words as I see fit, despite their meanings. Any fan of my poetry knows that."
-- Will Dockery
Will Dockery
2020-07-06 04:25:43 UTC
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Post by Michael Pendragon
The quote implies that his lyrics are "poetic."
That's right.

;)
Michael Pendragon
2020-07-06 13:52:47 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
The quote implies that his lyrics are "poetic."
That's right.
Obviously. However, it does *not* mean that his lyrics are "poetry."

"Dictionaries are over-rated. I use words as I see fit, despite their meanings. Any fan of my poetry knows that."
-- Will Dockery
Will Dockery
2020-07-06 04:35:37 UTC
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Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
"Dylan was awarded the 2016 Nobel Prize in Literature on October 13, 2016, for having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition..."
It clearly specifies that he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature for the poetic qualities of his music.
His lyrics aka poetry.
"Dictionaries are
<forgery snipped>

Why do you lie so much, Pendragon?

You know I didn't write that quote you attributed to me.

:)
Michael Pendragon
2020-07-06 13:54:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
"Dylan was awarded the 2016 Nobel Prize in Literature on October 13, 2016, for having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition..."
It clearly specifies that he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature for the poetic qualities of his music.
His lyrics aka poetry.
"Dictionaries are
<forgery snipped>
Why do you lie so much, Pendragon?
You know I didn't write that quote you attributed to me.
It is attributed to its author.

You are not the only "Will Dockery" on the planet, and you are not the only "Will Dockery" in this group.
Will Dockery
2020-07-06 20:18:48 UTC
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Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
"Dylan was awarded the 2016 Nobel Prize in Literature on October 13, 2016, for having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition..."
It clearly specifies that he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature for the poetic qualities of his music.
His lyrics aka poetry.
"Dictionaries are
<forgery snipped>
Why do you lie so much, Pendragon?
You know I didn't write that quote you attributed to me.
It is attributed to its author.
You are not the only "Will Dockery"
<troll snip>

The impostor troll not only forges my name but steals my photograph, which, being the cover image of my poetry book

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019

Is not only identity theft but a copyright violation.

:)
Dental River
2020-07-06 20:31:23 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
"Dylan was awarded the 2016 Nobel Prize in Literature on October 13, 2016, for having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition..."
It clearly specifies that he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature for the poetic qualities of his music.
His lyrics aka poetry.
"Dictionaries are
<forgery snipped>
Why do you lie so much, Pendragon?
You know I didn't write that quote you attributed to me.
It is attributed to its author.
You are not the only "Will Dockery"
<troll snip>
The impostor troll not only forges my name but steals my photograph, which, being the cover image of my poetry book
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
Is not only identity theft but a copyright violation.
:)
The Perky award turned you into a monster, Will.

Wish we could go back to before all that.
ME
2020-07-06 21:42:24 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
"Dylan was awarded the 2016 Nobel Prize in Literature on October 13, 2016, for having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition..."
It clearly specifies that he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature for the poetic qualities of his music.
His lyrics aka poetry.
"Dictionaries are
<forgery snipped>
Why do you lie so much, Pendragon?
You know I didn't write that quote you attributed to me.
It is attributed to its author.
You are not the only "Will Dockery"
<troll snip>
The impostor troll not only forges my name but steals my photograph, which, being the cover image of my poetry book
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
Is not only identity theft but a copyright violation.
:)
You posted that photo here and on social media. It’s no longer yours, dimwit.
Will Dockery
2020-07-06 23:02:26 UTC
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Post by ME
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
"Dylan was awarded the 2016 Nobel Prize in Literature on October 13, 2016, for having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition..."
It clearly specifies that he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature for the poetic qualities of his music.
His lyrics aka poetry.
<forgery snipped>
Why do you lie so much, Pendragon?
You know I didn't write that quote you attributed to me.
It is attributed to its author.
You are not the only "Will Dockery"
<troll snip>
The impostor troll not only forges my name but steals my photograph, which, being the cover image of my poetry book
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
Is not only identity theft but a copyright violation.
:)
You posted that photo here and on social media. It’s no longer yours, dimwit.
The stolen photograph is actually a copyright infringement since it uses the cover of my book, and my publisher could have it taken down for that reason if for no other:

https://www.amazon.com/Selected-Poems-1976-2019-Will-Dockery/dp/0994860013

:)
Sherwood
2020-07-07 00:16:32 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Post by ME
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
"Dylan was awarded the 2016 Nobel Prize in Literature on October 13, 2016, for having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition..."
It clearly specifies that he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature for the poetic qualities of his music.
His lyrics aka poetry.
<forgery snipped>
Why do you lie so much, Pendragon?
You know I didn't write that quote you attributed to me.
It is attributed to its author.
You are not the only "Will Dockery"
<troll snip>
The impostor troll not only forges my name but steals my photograph, which, being the cover image of my poetry book
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
Is not only identity theft but a copyright violation.
:)
You posted that photo here and on social media. It’s no longer yours, dimwit.
https://www.amazon.com/Selected-Poems-1976-2019-Will-Dockery/dp/0994860013
:)
Quite a legit complaint, I daresay./...
Michael Pendragon
2020-07-07 02:05:38 UTC
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Post by ME
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
"Dylan was awarded the 2016 Nobel Prize in Literature on October 13, 2016, for having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition..."
It clearly specifies that he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature for the poetic qualities of his music.
His lyrics aka poetry.
<forgery snipped>
Why do you lie so much, Pendragon?
You know I didn't write that quote you attributed to me.
It is attributed to its author.
You are not the only "Will Dockery"
<troll snip>
The impostor troll not only forges my name but steals my photograph, which, being the cover image of my poetry book
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
Is not only identity theft but a copyright violation.
:)
You posted that photo here and on social media. It’s no longer yours, dimwit.
Why? Is your publisher ashamed of it?
Will Dockery
2020-07-07 02:44:07 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
"Dylan was awarded the 2016 Nobel Prize in Literature on October 13, 2016, for having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition..."
It clearly specifies that he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature for the poetic qualities of his music.
His lyrics aka poetry.
<troll snip>
Post by Will Dockery
The impostor troll not only forges my name but steals my photograph, which, being the cover image of my poetry book
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
Is not only identity theft but a copyright violation.
Why
<troll snip>

Once again, I ask:

Why do you lie so much, Pendragon?

You know I didn't write that quote you attributed to me.

:)
Michael Pendragon
2020-07-07 03:24:27 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
"Dylan was awarded the 2016 Nobel Prize in Literature on October 13, 2016, for having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition..."
It clearly specifies that he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature for the poetic qualities of his music.
His lyrics aka poetry.
<troll snip>
Post by Will Dockery
The impostor troll not only forges my name but steals my photograph, which, being the cover image of my poetry book
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
Is not only identity theft but a copyright violation.
Why
<troll snip>
Why do you lie so much, Pendragon?
You know I didn't write that quote you attributed to me.
Is he ashamed, Will?
Will Dockery
2020-07-07 03:28:47 UTC
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Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
"Dylan was awarded the 2016 Nobel Prize in Literature on October 13, 2016, for having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition..."
It clearly specifies that he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature for the poetic qualities of his music.
His lyrics aka poetry.
<troll snip>
Post by Will Dockery
The impostor troll not only forges my name but steals my photograph, which, being the cover image of my poetry book
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
Is not only identity theft but a copyright violation.
<troll snip>
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Why do you lie so much, Pendragon?
You know I didn't write that quote you attributed to me.
Is he ashamed, Will?
Of your friend's copyright infringement, forgery and identity theft?

Why would he be?
Michael Pendragon
2020-07-07 04:12:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
"Dylan was awarded the 2016 Nobel Prize in Literature on October 13, 2016, for having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition..."
It clearly specifies that he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature for the poetic qualities of his music.
His lyrics aka poetry.
<troll snip>
Post by Will Dockery
The impostor troll not only forges my name but steals my photograph, which, being the cover image of my poetry book
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
Is not only identity theft but a copyright violation.
<troll snip>
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Why do you lie so much, Pendragon?
You know I didn't write that quote you attributed to me.
Is he ashamed, Will?
Of your friend's copyright infringement, forgery and identity theft?
Why would he be?
The sad thing is that you probably think you're being witty.
Sherwood
2020-07-07 00:25:09 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
"Dylan was awarded the 2016 Nobel Prize in Literature on October 13, 2016, for having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition..."
It clearly specifies that he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature for the poetic qualities of his music.
His lyrics aka poetry.
"Dictionaries are
<forgery snipped>
Why do you lie so much, Pendragon?
You know I didn't write that quote you attributed to me.
It is attributed to its author.
You are not the only "Will Dockery"
<troll snip>
The impostor troll not only forges my name but steals my photograph, which, being the cover image of my poetry book
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
Is not only identity theft but a copyright violation.
:)
You nailed it, Doc...
Sherwood
2020-07-06 17:30:30 UTC
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Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Michael Pendragon
"Dictionaries are over-rated. I use words as I see fit, despite their meanings. Any fan of my poetry knows that."
-- Will Dockery
Spot on
Sherwood
2020-07-06 00:09:20 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
RECAP
As I wrote earlier, like you with Bukowski, Kerouac and Ginsberg... I try not to read your garbage, Pendragon.
So spare me.
;)
Indeed...
Will Dockery
2020-06-24 19:28:36 UTC
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Post by Antti
This Old Cottage
This old cottage [is]
a survivor from 1930's.
Still standing on the rock
where it was built
on a distant another world.
Good opening, good image.
Post by Antti
Back when Hitler was burning books
here it stood.
The professor from Helsinki
taking a break
with his family.
On the doorway the names are written
with fading led,
As Karen pointed out, this would be "lead"
Post by Antti
The 1940's featured strongly
as the bombs fell in Helsinki
here it stood.
The war ended, the people aged
the wooden beams were treated to stand the rain
again and again.
One family selling it to another.
50's - 60's - 70's
here it stood.
Through [the] Vietnam war
computer revolution
and then there was me.
Hanging pike heads on a tree.
This could use another line or two to explain.
Post by Antti
Now sitting in silence
looking back at my own life
and that of this old cottage.
If only we could treat our skin
and the insides would not rot
as the years go by
with the memories.
I listen to the crow
to the fly
to the distant neighbor
who does not realize how well his voice carries.
One day
this old cottage will stand
and my name will be;
on that doorway - just another memory
in a future that will be, what it will be.
--
Specifically, that's what I like about this poem... again, all it needs is a bit of editing.
Michael Pendragon
2020-06-25 05:41:05 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Antti
This Old Cottage
This old cottage [is]
a survivor from 1930's.
Still standing on the rock
where it was built
on a distant another world.
Good opening, good image.
Post by Antti
Back when Hitler was burning books
here it stood.
The professor from Helsinki
taking a break
with his family.
On the doorway the names are written
with fading led,
As Karen pointed out, this would be "lead"
Post by Antti
The 1940's featured strongly
as the bombs fell in Helsinki
here it stood.
The war ended, the people aged
the wooden beams were treated to stand the rain
again and again.
One family selling it to another.
50's - 60's - 70's
here it stood.
Through [the] Vietnam war
computer revolution
and then there was me.
Hanging pike heads on a tree.
This could use another line or two to explain.
Post by Antti
Now sitting in silence
looking back at my own life
and that of this old cottage.
If only we could treat our skin
and the insides would not rot
as the years go by
with the memories.
I listen to the crow
to the fly
to the distant neighbor
who does not realize how well his voice carries.
One day
this old cottage will stand
and my name will be;
on that doorway - just another memory
in a future that will be, what it will be.
--
Specifically, that's what I like about this poem... again, all it needs is a bit of editing.
Let's see... you plugged in a few corrections (that were already suggested by Karen and myself), and said "Good opening, good image."

Which image is good? What makes this image good? How do you define "good"?
Will Dockery
2020-06-25 20:09:49 UTC
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Post by Antti
This Old Cottage
This old cottage
a survivor from 1930's.
Still standing on the rock
where it was built
on a distant another world.
Back when Hitler was burning books
here it stood.
The professor from Helsinki
taking a break
with his family.
On the doorway the names are written
The 1940's featured strongly
as the bombs fell in Helsinki
here it stood.
The war ended, the people aged
the wooden beams were treated to stand the rain
again and again.
One family selling it to another.
50's - 60's - 70's
here it stood.
Through Vietnam war
computer revolution
and then there was me.
Hanging pike heads on a tree.
Now sitting in silence
looking back at my own life
and that of this old cottage.
If only we could treat our skin
and the insides would not rot
as the years go by
with the memories.
I listen to the crow
to the fly
to the distant neighbor
who does not realize how well his voice carries.
One day
this old cottage will stand
and my name will be;
on that doorway - just another memory
in a future that will be, what it will be.
--
An OB poem, somewhat, here is a poem based on a dream I had that was my grandfather's house, but in the dream/poem morphs into something else, something that reaches farther into the past:

It Is Now A Grand Hotel

Lights flicker
in dark hills
the long road
past my past.

The Grand Hotel
is a subtly eerie
little empty spot
lit in sepia tones.

I had it on
and it formed
some of the weirdest
little dreams.

Horsemen angels
wailing lost
clicking languages
as a soundtrack
weaved in my brain.

I paid my toll
and was allowed
to wear a badge
color coded for accuracy.

Candle light
like a copper tone
I was waved along
down the darkened path.

I awoke too soon
or perhaps just in time
to return here
to break the pattern.

Debatable which was
the best move
though that empty hill
informs me
I know, I know.

-Will Dockery / 4-1-18
Zod
2020-07-01 00:15:05 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Antti
This Old Cottage
This old cottage
a survivor from 1930's.
Still standing on the rock
where it was built
on a distant another world.
Back when Hitler was burning books
here it stood.
The professor from Helsinki
taking a break
with his family.
On the doorway the names are written
The 1940's featured strongly
as the bombs fell in Helsinki
here it stood.
The war ended, the people aged
the wooden beams were treated to stand the rain
again and again.
One family selling it to another.
50's - 60's - 70's
here it stood.
Through Vietnam war
computer revolution
and then there was me.
Hanging pike heads on a tree.
Now sitting in silence
looking back at my own life
and that of this old cottage.
If only we could treat our skin
and the insides would not rot
as the years go by
with the memories.
I listen to the crow
to the fly
to the distant neighbor
who does not realize how well his voice carries.
One day
this old cottage will stand
and my name will be;
on that doorway - just another memory
in a future that will be, what it will be.
--
Excellent visuals, Antti....
Will Dockery
2020-07-04 13:06:15 UTC
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Post by ME
Post by Will Dockery
Post by ME
Post by Will Dockery
Post by ME
Michael doesn’t understand or knows what modern poetry is
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/alt.arts.poetry.comments/49a7-W02I0E/ydzf1mrlCgAJ
Post by ME
Post by Will Dockery
Post by ME
Post by Will Dockery
"I'd simply burn the garbage churned out by no-talent phonies like Bukowski, Kerouac and Ginsberg." -Michael Pendragon
His statement above proves my point for me.
;)
He doesn’t like those poets
Right, he doesn't understand/appreciate modern poetry, since those three poets named above, Charles Bukowski, Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg, are widely known as three of the best poets of the 20th Century.
Look it up.
Maybe in your world they are. But not everyone believes that, will.
The majority of poetry experts agree with me, not Pendragon... like I said, look it up.

;)
Will Dockery
2020-07-07 04:25:47 UTC
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No, I'm just calling you what you are, Michael Pendragon:

A lying troll.

:)
Michael Pendragon
2020-07-07 04:55:23 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
A lying troll.
Psst... You're whining.
Will Dockery
2020-07-10 18:31:07 UTC
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Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
A lying troll.
Psst... You're
I'm calling it as I see it, Pendragon.

:)
ME
2020-07-07 04:57:55 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
A lying troll.
:)
No he’s not, Will. . You’re pissed because he’s outed you as an idiot again.
Will Dockery
2020-07-07 10:16:23 UTC
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Post by ME
Post by Will Dockery
A lying troll.
:)
No he’s not
As if you'd agree with my judgement.

;)
Rocky
2020-07-08 00:10:05 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
A lying troll.
:)
Sad but true....
George J. Dance
2020-07-10 18:49:03 UTC
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Post by Antti
This Old Cottage
This old cottage
a survivor from 1930's.
Still standing on the rock
where it was built
on a distant another world.
Back when Hitler was burning books
here it stood.
The professor from Helsinki
taking a break
with his family.
On the doorway the names are written
The 1940's featured strongly
as the bombs fell in Helsinki
here it stood.
The war ended, the people aged
the wooden beams were treated to stand the rain
again and again.
One family selling it to another.
50's - 60's - 70's
here it stood.
Through Vietnam war
computer revolution
and then there was me.
Hanging pike heads on a tree.
Now sitting in silence
looking back at my own life
and that of this old cottage.
If only we could treat our skin
and the insides would not rot
as the years go by
with the memories.
I listen to the crow
to the fly
to the distant neighbor
who does not realize how well his voice carries.
One day
this old cottage will stand
and my name will be;
on that doorway - just another memory
in a future that will be, what it will be.
--
Antti: I hope you're still reading here. If so, I hope this song, which your poem reminded me of, cheers you up a bit:

Rosemary Clooney, This Old House


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