Discussion:
Dylan and Bukowski (and Mette Fugl)
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Will Dockery
2018-02-05 05:21:31 UTC
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Well, so Bob Dylan attempted to pay Bukowski a visit at some point, but
Buk couldn't be bothered.
Shunning is a high art.
Buk was a lover of classical music, folk and rock didn't interest him much.
Will Dockery
2018-02-05 05:27:10 UTC
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Permalink
Stephan Pickering wrote in message news:96eb5a3f-9049-4619-b9e5-***@googlegroups.com...

these two young ones
in the court across from me
they play Bob Dylan
all day and all night
on their stereo

they turn that stereo
as high as it can go
and it's a very good
stereo

but right now
it's Bob Dylan
Bob Dylan Bob
Dylan all the
way.


the whole neighborhood
gets Bob Dylan free

and I get him freest of all
because I live in the court
across the way

I get Dylan when I shit
I get Dylan when I fuck
and just before I try to sleep

sometimes I see them
outside on the sidewalk
quite young and neat
going out for food and
toilet paper

they are one of the loveliest
couples in the
neighborhood.
-- Charles Bukowski, 1976. Bob Dylan. Coldspring Journal # 10

Bukowski held a specific disdain for the work of Bob Dylan: "He’s only
written one good poem. But even that’s not very good. Something about trees
and all that […] it dips off at the end [his] words are common, but they’re
also very weak […] there’s a touch of melodrama that doesn’t quite ring
true." Although he uses the word “poem,” Bukowski is probably making
reference to Dylan’s lyrics rather than to the rambling free-association
verse contained in Tarantula, the singer’s collection of prose and poetry.
It is not surprising that Dylan’s lyrics were unpalatable to the “dirty
realist” poet of the street. “Mr Tambourine Man,” for example, is
essentially a non-linear stream of consciousness narrative open to multiple
interpretations. Where artists such as Dylan go wrong, suggests Bukowski, is
“ spend[ing] so much time talking about living that they don’t have time to
live.” In a letter to fellow poet Al Purdy, Bukowski claimed that when he
listens to classical music he feels “Dylan melting like a candle.”
-- Steve Brie, 2012. Watching the wall's dance: Charles Bukowski's musical
landscape. Magazine Americana January www.AmericanPopularCulture.com

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Wow, great find, Stephan.

:)
Will Dockery
2018-03-16 02:08:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Stephan Pickering wrote in message news:96eb5a3f-9049-4619-b9e5-***@googlegroups.com...

these two young ones
in the court across from me
they play Bob Dylan
all day and all night
on their stereo

they turn that stereo
as high as it can go
and it's a very good
stereo

but right now
it's Bob Dylan
Bob Dylan Bob
Dylan all the
way.


the whole neighborhood
gets Bob Dylan free

and I get him freest of all
because I live in the court
across the way

I get Dylan when I shit
I get Dylan when I fuck
and just before I try to sleep

sometimes I see them
outside on the sidewalk
quite young and neat
going out for food and
toilet paper

they are one of the loveliest
couples in the
neighborhood.
-- Charles Bukowski, 1976. Bob Dylan. Coldspring Journal # 10

Bukowski held a specific disdain for the work of Bob Dylan: "He’s only
written one good poem. But even that’s not very good. Something about trees
and all that […] it dips off at the end [his] words are common, but they’re
also very weak […] there’s a touch of melodrama that doesn’t quite ring
true." Although he uses the word “poem,” Bukowski is probably making
reference to Dylan’s lyrics rather than to the rambling free-association
verse contained in Tarantula, the singer’s collection of prose and poetry.
It is not surprising that Dylan’s lyrics were unpalatable to the “dirty
realist” poet of the street. “Mr Tambourine Man,” for example, is
essentially a non-linear stream of consciousness narrative open to multiple
interpretations. Where artists such as Dylan go wrong, suggests Bukowski, is
“ spend[ing] so much time talking about living that they don’t have time to
live.” In a letter to fellow poet Al Purdy, Bukowski claimed that when he
listens to classical music he feels “Dylan melting like a candle.”
-- Steve Brie, 2012. Watching the wall's dance: Charles Bukowski's musical
landscape. Magazine Americana January www.AmericanPopularCulture.com

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

I'm reading the paperback collection of Bukowski's love poetry called "On
Love", what a powerful and amazing writer he was... down and on the street
level master of words.
Good Time Charley
2018-11-13 03:32:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
these two young ones
in the court across from me
they play Bob Dylan
all day and all night
on their stereo
they turn that stereo
as high as it can go
and it's a very good
stereo
but right now
it's Bob Dylan
Bob Dylan Bob
Dylan all the
way.
the whole neighborhood
gets Bob Dylan free
and I get him freest of all
because I live in the court
across the way
I get Dylan when I shit
I get Dylan when I fuck
and just before I try to sleep
sometimes I see them
outside on the sidewalk
quite young and neat
going out for food and
toilet paper
they are one of the loveliest
couples in the
neighborhood.
-- Charles Bukowski, 1976. Bob Dylan. Coldspring Journal # 10
Bukowski held a specific disdain for the work of Bob Dylan: "He’s only
written one good poem. But even that’s not very good. Something about trees
and all that […] it dips off at the end [his] words are common, but they’re
also very weak […] there’s a touch of melodrama that doesn’t quite ring
true." Although he uses the word “poem,” Bukowski is probably making
reference to Dylan’s lyrics rather than to the rambling free-association
verse contained in Tarantula, the singer’s collection of prose and poetry.
It is not surprising that Dylan’s lyrics were unpalatable to the “dirty
realist” poet of the street. “Mr Tambourine Man,” for example, is
essentially a non-linear stream of consciousness narrative open to multiple
interpretations. Where artists such as Dylan go wrong, suggests Bukowski, is
“ spend[ing] so much time talking about living that they don’t have time to
live.” In a letter to fellow poet Al Purdy, Bukowski claimed that when he
listens to classical music he feels “Dylan melting like a candle.”
-- Steve Brie, 2012. Watching the wall's dance: Charles Bukowski's musical
landscape. Magazine Americana January www.AmericanPopularCulture.com
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
I'm reading the paperback collection of Bukowski's love poetry called "On
Love", what a powerful and amazing writer he was... down and on the street
level master of words.
Good poems...………….
Michael Pendragon
2018-11-13 13:11:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Good Time Charley
Post by Will Dockery
these two young ones
in the court across from me
they play Bob Dylan
all day and all night
on their stereo
they turn that stereo
as high as it can go
and it's a very good
stereo
but right now
it's Bob Dylan
Bob Dylan Bob
Dylan all the
way.
the whole neighborhood
gets Bob Dylan free
and I get him freest of all
because I live in the court
across the way
I get Dylan when I shit
I get Dylan when I fuck
and just before I try to sleep
sometimes I see them
outside on the sidewalk
quite young and neat
going out for food and
toilet paper
they are one of the loveliest
couples in the
neighborhood.
-- Charles Bukowski, 1976. Bob Dylan. Coldspring Journal # 10
Bukowski held a specific disdain for the work of Bob Dylan: "He’s only
written one good poem. But even that’s not very good. Something about trees
and all that […] it dips off at the end [his] words are common, but they’re
also very weak […] there’s a touch of melodrama that doesn’t quite ring
true." Although he uses the word “poem,” Bukowski is probably making
reference to Dylan’s lyrics rather than to the rambling free-association
verse contained in Tarantula, the singer’s collection of prose and poetry.
It is not surprising that Dylan’s lyrics were unpalatable to the “dirty
realist” poet of the street. “Mr Tambourine Man,” for example, is
essentially a non-linear stream of consciousness narrative open to multiple
interpretations. Where artists such as Dylan go wrong, suggests Bukowski, is
“ spend[ing] so much time talking about living that they don’t have time to
live.” In a letter to fellow poet Al Purdy, Bukowski claimed that when he
listens to classical music he feels “Dylan melting like a candle.”
-- Steve Brie, 2012. Watching the wall's dance: Charles Bukowski's musical
landscape. Magazine Americana January www.AmericanPopularCulture.com
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
I'm reading the paperback collection of Bukowski's love poetry called "On
Love", what a powerful and amazing writer he was... down and on the street
level master of words.
Good poems...………….
Good dog!
Good Time Charley
2018-11-02 20:42:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
these two young ones
in the court across from me
they play Bob Dylan
all day and all night
on their stereo
they turn that stereo
as high as it can go
and it's a very good
stereo
but right now
it's Bob Dylan
Bob Dylan Bob
Dylan all the
way.
the whole neighborhood
gets Bob Dylan free
and I get him freest of all
because I live in the court
across the way
I get Dylan when I shit
I get Dylan when I fuck
and just before I try to sleep
sometimes I see them
outside on the sidewalk
quite young and neat
going out for food and
toilet paper
they are one of the loveliest
couples in the
neighborhood.
-- Charles Bukowski, 1976. Bob Dylan. Coldspring Journal # 10
Bukowski held a specific disdain for the work of Bob Dylan: "He’s only
written one good poem. But even that’s not very good. Something about trees
and all that […] it dips off at the end [his] words are common, but they’re
also very weak […] there’s a touch of melodrama that doesn’t quite ring
true." Although he uses the word “poem,” Bukowski is probably making
reference to Dylan’s lyrics rather than to the rambling free-association
verse contained in Tarantula, the singer’s collection of prose and poetry.
It is not surprising that Dylan’s lyrics were unpalatable to the “dirty
realist” poet of the street. “Mr Tambourine Man,” for example, is
essentially a non-linear stream of consciousness narrative open to multiple
interpretations. Where artists such as Dylan go wrong, suggests Bukowski, is
“ spend[ing] so much time talking about living that they don’t have time to
live.” In a letter to fellow poet Al Purdy, Bukowski claimed that when he
listens to classical music he feels “Dylan melting like a candle.”
-- Steve Brie, 2012. Watching the wall's dance: Charles Bukowski's musical
landscape. Magazine Americana January www.AmericanPopularCulture.com
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Wow, great find, Stephan.
:)
Simply amazing................
Will Dockery
2018-11-03 00:03:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Yes, Bukowski had a preference for classical music.
General Zod
2018-11-04 06:17:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
these two young ones
in the court across from me
they play Bob Dylan
all day and all night
on their stereo
they turn that stereo
as high as it can go
and it's a very good
stereo
but right now
it's Bob Dylan
Bob Dylan Bob
Dylan all the
way.
the whole neighborhood
gets Bob Dylan free
and I get him freest of all
because I live in the court
across the way
I get Dylan when I shit
I get Dylan when I fuck
and just before I try to sleep
sometimes I see them
outside on the sidewalk
quite young and neat
going out for food and
toilet paper
they are one of the loveliest
couples in the
neighborhood.
-- Charles Bukowski, 1976. Bob Dylan. Coldspring Journal # 10
Bukowski held a specific disdain for the work of Bob Dylan: "He’s only
written one good poem. But even that’s not very good. Something about trees
and all that […] it dips off at the end [his] words are common, but they’re
also very weak […] there’s a touch of melodrama that doesn’t quite ring
true." Although he uses the word “poem,” Bukowski is probably making
reference to Dylan’s lyrics rather than to the rambling free-association
verse contained in Tarantula, the singer’s collection of prose and poetry.
It is not surprising that Dylan’s lyrics were unpalatable to the “dirty
realist” poet of the street. “Mr Tambourine Man,” for example, is
essentially a non-linear stream of consciousness narrative open to multiple
interpretations. Where artists such as Dylan go wrong, suggests Bukowski, is
“ spend[ing] so much time talking about living that they don’t have time to
live.” In a letter to fellow poet Al Purdy, Bukowski claimed that when he
listens to classical music he feels “Dylan melting like a candle.”
-- Steve Brie, 2012. Watching the wall's dance: Charles Bukowski's musical
landscape. Magazine Americana January www.AmericanPopularCulture.com
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Wow, great find, Stephan.
:)
Bukowski was a brilliant poet...……………...
Michael Pendragon
2018-11-04 06:24:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by General Zod
Post by Will Dockery
these two young ones
in the court across from me
they play Bob Dylan
all day and all night
on their stereo
they turn that stereo
as high as it can go
and it's a very good
stereo
but right now
it's Bob Dylan
Bob Dylan Bob
Dylan all the
way.
the whole neighborhood
gets Bob Dylan free
and I get him freest of all
because I live in the court
across the way
I get Dylan when I shit
I get Dylan when I fuck
and just before I try to sleep
sometimes I see them
outside on the sidewalk
quite young and neat
going out for food and
toilet paper
they are one of the loveliest
couples in the
neighborhood.
-- Charles Bukowski, 1976. Bob Dylan. Coldspring Journal # 10
Bukowski held a specific disdain for the work of Bob Dylan: "He’s only
written one good poem. But even that’s not very good. Something about trees
and all that […] it dips off at the end [his] words are common, but they’re
also very weak […] there’s a touch of melodrama that doesn’t quite ring
true." Although he uses the word “poem,” Bukowski is probably making
reference to Dylan’s lyrics rather than to the rambling free-association
verse contained in Tarantula, the singer’s collection of prose and poetry.
It is not surprising that Dylan’s lyrics were unpalatable to the “dirty
realist” poet of the street. “Mr Tambourine Man,” for example, is
essentially a non-linear stream of consciousness narrative open to multiple
interpretations. Where artists such as Dylan go wrong, suggests Bukowski, is
“ spend[ing] so much time talking about living that they don’t have time to
live.” In a letter to fellow poet Al Purdy, Bukowski claimed that when he
listens to classical music he feels “Dylan melting like a candle.”
-- Steve Brie, 2012. Watching the wall's dance: Charles Bukowski's musical
landscape. Magazine Americana January www.AmericanPopularCulture.com
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Wow, great find, Stephan.
:)
Bukowski was a brilliant poet...……………...
You are sadly mistaken on both counts.
Will Dockery
2018-11-09 04:22:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
these two young ones
in the court across from me
they play Bob Dylan
all day and all night
on their stereo
they turn that stereo
as high as it can go
and it's a very good
stereo
but right now
it's Bob Dylan
Bob Dylan Bob
Dylan all the
way.
the whole neighborhood
gets Bob Dylan free
and I get him freest of all
because I live in the court
across the way
I get Dylan when I shit
I get Dylan when I fuck
and just before I try to sleep
sometimes I see them
outside on the sidewalk
quite young and neat
going out for food and
toilet paper
they are one of the loveliest
couples in the
neighborhood.
-- Charles Bukowski, 1976. Bob Dylan. Coldspring Journal # 10
Bukowski held a specific disdain for the work of Bob Dylan: "He’s only
written one good poem. But even that’s not very good. Something about trees
and all that […] it dips off at the end [his] words are common, but they’re
also very weak […] there’s a touch of melodrama that doesn’t quite ring
true." Although he uses the word “poem,” Bukowski is probably making
reference to Dylan’s lyrics rather than to the rambling free-association
verse contained in Tarantula, the singer’s collection of prose and poetry.
It is not surprising that Dylan’s lyrics were unpalatable to the “dirty
realist” poet of the street. “Mr Tambourine Man,” for example, is
essentially a non-linear stream of consciousness narrative open to multiple
interpretations. Where artists such as Dylan go wrong, suggests Bukowski, is
“ spend[ing] so much time talking about living that they don’t have time to
live.” In a letter to fellow poet Al Purdy, Bukowski claimed that when he
listens to classical music he feels “Dylan melting like a candle.”
-- Steve Brie, 2012. Watching the wall's dance: Charles Bukowski's musical
landscape. Magazine Americana January www.AmericanPopularCulture.com
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Wow, great find, Stephan.
:)
Bukowski was a brilliant poet...……………...
You are sadly mistaken on both counts.
Actually you just proved my point for me, that you lack understanding of
modern poetry, Pen.
Michael Pendragon
2018-11-09 13:10:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
these two young ones
in the court across from me
they play Bob Dylan
all day and all night
on their stereo
they turn that stereo
as high as it can go
and it's a very good
stereo
but right now
it's Bob Dylan
Bob Dylan Bob
Dylan all the
way.
the whole neighborhood
gets Bob Dylan free
and I get him freest of all
because I live in the court
across the way
I get Dylan when I shit
I get Dylan when I fuck
and just before I try to sleep
sometimes I see them
outside on the sidewalk
quite young and neat
going out for food and
toilet paper
they are one of the loveliest
couples in the
neighborhood.
-- Charles Bukowski, 1976. Bob Dylan. Coldspring Journal # 10
Bukowski held a specific disdain for the work of Bob Dylan: "He’s only
written one good poem. But even that’s not very good. Something about trees
and all that […] it dips off at the end [his] words are common, but they’re
also very weak […] there’s a touch of melodrama that doesn’t quite ring
true." Although he uses the word “poem,” Bukowski is probably making
reference to Dylan’s lyrics rather than to the rambling free-association
verse contained in Tarantula, the singer’s collection of prose and poetry.
It is not surprising that Dylan’s lyrics were unpalatable to the “dirty
realist” poet of the street. “Mr Tambourine Man,” for example, is
essentially a non-linear stream of consciousness narrative open to multiple
interpretations. Where artists such as Dylan go wrong, suggests Bukowski, is
“ spend[ing] so much time talking about living that they don’t have time to
live.” In a letter to fellow poet Al Purdy, Bukowski claimed that when he
listens to classical music he feels “Dylan melting like a candle.”
-- Steve Brie, 2012. Watching the wall's dance: Charles Bukowski's musical
landscape. Magazine Americana January www.AmericanPopularCulture.com
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Wow, great find, Stephan.
:)
Bukowski was a brilliant poet...……………...
You are sadly mistaken on both counts.
Actually you just proved my point for me, that you lack understanding of
modern poetry, Pen.
If you ever manage to write a critical analysis of one of Buk's poems, we'll see.
Will Dockery
2018-11-09 15:36:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
these two young ones
in the court across from me
they play Bob Dylan
all day and all night
on their stereo
they turn that stereo
as high as it can go
and it's a very good
stereo
but right now
it's Bob Dylan
Bob Dylan Bob
Dylan all the
way.
the whole neighborhood
gets Bob Dylan free
and I get him freest of all
because I live in the court
across the way
I get Dylan when I shit
I get Dylan when I fuck
and just before I try to sleep
sometimes I see them
outside on the sidewalk
quite young and neat
going out for food and
toilet paper
they are one of the loveliest
couples in the
neighborhood.
-- Charles Bukowski, 1976. Bob Dylan. Coldspring Journal # 10
Bukowski held a specific disdain for the work of Bob Dylan: "He’s only
written one good poem. But even that’s not very good. Something about trees
and all that […] it dips off at the end [his] words are common, but they’re
also very weak […] there’s a touch of melodrama that doesn’t quite ring
true." Although he uses the word “poem,” Bukowski is probably making
reference to Dylan’s lyrics rather than to the rambling free-association
verse contained in Tarantula, the singer’s collection of prose and poetry.
It is not surprising that Dylan’s lyrics were unpalatable to the “dirty
realist” poet of the street. “Mr Tambourine Man,” for example, is
essentially a non-linear stream of consciousness narrative open to multiple
interpretations. Where artists such as Dylan go wrong, suggests Bukowski, is
“ spend[ing] so much time talking about living that they don’t have time to
live.” In a letter to fellow poet Al Purdy, Bukowski claimed that when he
listens to classical music he feels “Dylan melting like a candle.”
-- Steve Brie, 2012. Watching the wall's dance: Charles Bukowski's musical
landscape. Magazine Americana January www.AmericanPopularCulture.com
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Wow, great find, Stephan.
:)
Bukowski was a brilliant poet...……………...
You are sadly mistaken on both counts.
Actually you just proved my point for me, that you lack understanding of
modern poetry, Pen.
If you ever manage to write a critical analysis of one of Buk's poems, we'll see.
You once posted your directions for writing a good critique here, Pen.

Would you mind reposting that for me?
Michael Pendragon
2018-11-09 15:47:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
these two young ones
in the court across from me
they play Bob Dylan
all day and all night
on their stereo
they turn that stereo
as high as it can go
and it's a very good
stereo
but right now
it's Bob Dylan
Bob Dylan Bob
Dylan all the
way.
the whole neighborhood
gets Bob Dylan free
and I get him freest of all
because I live in the court
across the way
I get Dylan when I shit
I get Dylan when I fuck
and just before I try to sleep
sometimes I see them
outside on the sidewalk
quite young and neat
going out for food and
toilet paper
they are one of the loveliest
couples in the
neighborhood.
-- Charles Bukowski, 1976. Bob Dylan. Coldspring Journal # 10
Bukowski held a specific disdain for the work of Bob Dylan: "He’s only
written one good poem. But even that’s not very good. Something about
trees
and all that […] it dips off at the end [his] words are common, but they’re
also very weak […] there’s a touch of melodrama that doesn’t quite ring
true." Although he uses the word “poem,” Bukowski is probably making
reference to Dylan’s lyrics rather than to the rambling free-association
verse contained in Tarantula, the singer’s collection of prose and
poetry.
It is not surprising that Dylan’s lyrics were unpalatable to the “dirty
realist” poet of the street. “Mr Tambourine Man,” for example, is
essentially a non-linear stream of consciousness narrative open to multiple
interpretations. Where artists such as Dylan go wrong, suggests
Bukowski, is
“ spend[ing] so much time talking about living that they don’t have time
to
live.” In a letter to fellow poet Al Purdy, Bukowski claimed that when he
listens to classical music he feels “Dylan melting like a candle.”
-- Steve Brie, 2012. Watching the wall's dance: Charles Bukowski's musical
landscape. Magazine Americana January www.AmericanPopularCulture.com
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Wow, great find, Stephan.
:)
Bukowski was a brilliant poet...……………...
You are sadly mistaken on both counts.
Actually you just proved my point for me, that you lack understanding of
modern poetry, Pen.
If you ever manage to write a critical analysis of one of Buk's poems, we'll see.
You once posted your directions for writing a good critique here, Pen.
Would you mind reposting that for me?
I haven't got it on file.

If you remember a few of the key words, try searching for it.
Will Dockery
2019-03-23 04:52:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
these two young ones
in the court across from me
they play Bob Dylan
all day and all night
on their stereo
they turn that stereo
as high as it can go
and it's a very good
stereo
but right now
it's Bob Dylan
Bob Dylan Bob
Dylan all the
way.
the whole neighborhood
gets Bob Dylan free
and I get him freest of all
because I live in the court
across the way
I get Dylan when I shit
I get Dylan when I fuck
and just before I try to sleep
sometimes I see them
outside on the sidewalk
quite young and neat
going out for food and
toilet paper
they are one of the loveliest
couples in the
neighborhood.
-- Charles Bukowski, 1976. Bob Dylan. Coldspring Journal # 10
Bukowski held a specific disdain for the work of Bob Dylan: "He’s only
written one good poem. But even that’s not very good. Something about
trees
and all that […] it dips off at the end [his] words are common,
but they’re
also very weak […] there’s a touch of melodrama that doesn’t quite
ring
true." Although he uses the word “poem,” Bukowski is probably making
reference to Dylan’s lyrics rather than to the rambling free-association
verse contained in Tarantula, the singer’s collection of prose and
poetry.
It is not surprising that Dylan’s lyrics were unpalatable to the “dirty
realist” poet of the street. “Mr Tambourine Man,” for example, is
essentially a non-linear stream of consciousness narrative open to multiple
interpretations. Where artists such as Dylan go wrong, suggests
Bukowski, is
“ spend[ing] so much time talking about living that they don’t
have time
to
live.” In a letter to fellow poet Al Purdy, Bukowski claimed that
when
he
listens to classical music he feels “Dylan melting like a candle.”
-- Steve Brie, 2012. Watching the wall's dance: Charles Bukowski's musical
landscape. Magazine Americana January
www.AmericanPopularCulture.com
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Wow, great find, Stephan.
:)
Bukowski was a brilliant poet...……………...
You are sadly mistaken on both counts.
Actually you just proved my point for me, that you lack understanding of
modern poetry, Pen.
If you ever manage to write a critical analysis of one of Buk's poems, we'll see.
You once posted your directions for writing a good critique here, Pen.
Would you mind reposting that for me?
I haven't got it on file.

If you remember a few of the key words, try searching for it.

----------------------------------------------------------------

I will do that.
Will Dockery
2018-11-11 16:57:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by General Zod
Post by Will Dockery
these two young ones
in the court across from me
they play Bob Dylan
all day and all night
on their stereo
they turn that stereo
as high as it can go
and it's a very good
stereo
but right now
it's Bob Dylan
Bob Dylan Bob
Dylan all the
way.
the whole neighborhood
gets Bob Dylan free
and I get him freest of all
because I live in the court
across the way
I get Dylan when I shit
I get Dylan when I fuck
and just before I try to sleep
sometimes I see them
outside on the sidewalk
quite young and neat
going out for food and
toilet paper
they are one of the loveliest
couples in the
neighborhood.
-- Charles Bukowski, 1976. Bob Dylan. Coldspring Journal # 10
Bukowski held a specific disdain for the work of Bob Dylan: "He’s only
written one good poem. But even that’s not very good. Something about trees
and all that […] it dips off at the end [his] words are common, but they’re
also very weak […] there’s a touch of melodrama that doesn’t quite ring
true." Although he uses the word “poem,” Bukowski is probably making
reference to Dylan’s lyrics rather than to the rambling free-association
verse contained in Tarantula, the singer’s collection of prose and poetry.
It is not surprising that Dylan’s lyrics were unpalatable to the “dirty
realist” poet of the street. “Mr Tambourine Man,” for example, is
essentially a non-linear stream of consciousness narrative open to multiple
interpretations. Where artists such as Dylan go wrong, suggests Bukowski, is
“ spend[ing] so much time talking about living that they don’t have time to
live.” In a letter to fellow poet Al Purdy, Bukowski claimed that when he
listens to classical music he feels “Dylan melting like a candle.”
-- Steve Brie, 2012. Watching the wall's dance: Charles Bukowski's musical
landscape. Magazine Americana January www.AmericanPopularCulture.com
Bukowski was a brilliant poet...……………...
You are sadly mistaken on both counts.
While Kurt Vonnegut Jr. hated the poetry of Bob Dylan:

https://www.reddit.com/r/books/comments/58i0ic/kurt_vonnegut_in_1991_bob_dylan_is_the_worst_poet/

Kurt Vonnegut Jr. in 1991: “Bob Dylan Is the Worst Poet Alive”

:)
Good Time Charley
2018-11-16 00:37:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by General Zod
Post by Will Dockery
these two young ones
in the court across from me
they play Bob Dylan
all day and all night
on their stereo
they turn that stereo
as high as it can go
and it's a very good
stereo
but right now
it's Bob Dylan
Bob Dylan Bob
Dylan all the
way.
the whole neighborhood
gets Bob Dylan free
and I get him freest of all
because I live in the court
across the way
I get Dylan when I shit
I get Dylan when I fuck
and just before I try to sleep
sometimes I see them
outside on the sidewalk
quite young and neat
going out for food and
toilet paper
they are one of the loveliest
couples in the
neighborhood.
-- Charles Bukowski, 1976. Bob Dylan. Coldspring Journal # 10
Bukowski held a specific disdain for the work of Bob Dylan: "He’s only
written one good poem. But even that’s not very good. Something about trees
and all that […] it dips off at the end [his] words are common, but they’re
also very weak […] there’s a touch of melodrama that doesn’t quite ring
true." Although he uses the word “poem,” Bukowski is probably making
reference to Dylan’s lyrics rather than to the rambling free-association
verse contained in Tarantula, the singer’s collection of prose and poetry.
It is not surprising that Dylan’s lyrics were unpalatable to the “dirty
realist” poet of the street. “Mr Tambourine Man,” for example, is
essentially a non-linear stream of consciousness narrative open to multiple
interpretations. Where artists such as Dylan go wrong, suggests Bukowski, is
“ spend[ing] so much time talking about living that they don’t have time to
live.” In a letter to fellow poet Al Purdy, Bukowski claimed that when he
listens to classical music he feels “Dylan melting like a candle.”
-- Steve Brie, 2012. Watching the wall's dance: Charles Bukowski's musical
landscape. Magazine Americana January www.AmericanPopularCulture.com
Bukowski was a brilliant poet...……………...
You are sadly mistaken on both counts.
https://www.reddit.com/r/books/comments/58i0ic/kurt_vonnegut_in_1991_bob_dylan_is_the_worst_poet/
Kurt Vonnegut Jr. in 1991: “Bob Dylan Is the Worst Poet Alive”
:)

George J. Dance
2019-05-12 12:15:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by General Zod
Post by Will Dockery
these two young ones
in the court across from me
they play Bob Dylan
all day and all night
on their stereo
they turn that stereo
as high as it can go
and it's a very good
stereo
but right now
it's Bob Dylan
Bob Dylan Bob
Dylan all the
way.
the whole neighborhood
gets Bob Dylan free
and I get him freest of all
because I live in the court
across the way
I get Dylan when I shit
I get Dylan when I fuck
and just before I try to sleep
sometimes I see them
outside on the sidewalk
quite young and neat
going out for food and
toilet paper
they are one of the loveliest
couples in the
neighborhood.
-- Charles Bukowski, 1976. Bob Dylan. Coldspring Journal # 10
Bukowski held a specific disdain for the work of Bob Dylan: "He’s only
written one good poem. But even that’s not very good. Something about trees
and all that […] it dips off at the end [his] words are common, but they’re
also very weak […] there’s a touch of melodrama that doesn’t quite ring
true." Although he uses the word “poem,” Bukowski is probably making
reference to Dylan’s lyrics rather than to the rambling free-association
verse contained in Tarantula, the singer’s collection of prose and poetry.
It is not surprising that Dylan’s lyrics were unpalatable to the “dirty
realist” poet of the street. “Mr Tambourine Man,” for example, is
essentially a non-linear stream of consciousness narrative open to multiple
interpretations. Where artists such as Dylan go wrong, suggests Bukowski, is
“ spend[ing] so much time talking about living that they don’t have time to
live.” In a letter to fellow poet Al Purdy, Bukowski claimed that when he
listens to classical music he feels “Dylan melting like a candle.”
-- Steve Brie, 2012. Watching the wall's dance: Charles Bukowski's musical
landscape. Magazine Americana January www.AmericanPopularCulture.com
Bukowski was a brilliant poet...……………...
You are sadly mistaken on both counts.
https://www.reddit.com/r/books/comments/58i0ic/kurt_vonnegut_in_1991_bob_dylan_is_the_worst_poet/
Kurt Vonnegut Jr. in 1991: “Bob Dylan Is the Worst Poet Alive”
:)
There's nothing like going online on a Sunday and finding a poem by Paula Nancy Millstone Jennings:

The dead swans lay in the stagnant pool.
They lay. They rotted. They turned
Around occasionally.
Bits of flesh dropped off them from
Time to time
And sank into the pool's mire.
They also smelt a great deal.

I suppose PPP needs an article on her, but I really don't want to do the research.
Will Dockery
2019-05-12 16:31:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by General Zod
Post by Will Dockery
these two young ones
in the court across from me
they play Bob Dylan
all day and all night
on their stereo
they turn that stereo
as high as it can go
and it's a very good
stereo
but right now
it's Bob Dylan
Bob Dylan Bob
Dylan all the
way.
the whole neighborhood
gets Bob Dylan free
and I get him freest of all
because I live in the court
across the way
I get Dylan when I shit
I get Dylan when I fuck
and just before I try to sleep
sometimes I see them
outside on the sidewalk
quite young and neat
going out for food and
toilet paper
they are one of the loveliest
couples in the
neighborhood.
-- Charles Bukowski, 1976. Bob Dylan. Coldspring Journal # 10
Bukowski held a specific disdain for the work of Bob Dylan: "He’s only
written one good poem. But even that’s not very good. Something about trees
and all that […] it dips off at the end [his] words are common, but they’re
also very weak […] there’s a touch of melodrama that doesn’t quite ring
true." Although he uses the word “poem,” Bukowski is probably making
reference to Dylan’s lyrics rather than to the rambling free-association
verse contained in Tarantula, the singer’s collection of prose and poetry.
It is not surprising that Dylan’s lyrics were unpalatable to the “dirty
realist” poet of the street. “Mr Tambourine Man,” for example, is
essentially a non-linear stream of consciousness narrative open to multiple
interpretations. Where artists such as Dylan go wrong, suggests Bukowski, is
“ spend[ing] so much time talking about living that they don’t have time to
live.” In a letter to fellow poet Al Purdy, Bukowski claimed that when he
listens to classical music he feels “Dylan melting like a candle.”
-- Steve Brie, 2012. Watching the wall's dance: Charles Bukowski's musical
landscape. Magazine Americana January www.AmericanPopularCulture.com
Bukowski was a brilliant poet...……………...
You are sadly mistaken on both counts.
https://www.reddit.com/r/books/comments/58i0ic/kurt_vonnegut_in_1991_bob_dylan_is_the_worst_poet/
Kurt Vonnegut Jr. in 1991: “Bob Dylan Is the Worst Poet Alive”
:)
The dead swans lay in the stagnant pool.
They lay. They rotted. They turned
Around occasionally.
Bits of flesh dropped off them from
Time to time
And sank into the pool's mire.
They also smelt a great deal.
I suppose PPP needs an article on her, but I really don't want to do the research.
I see other Wiki bios on "Paula Nancy Millstone Jennings" which could be imported easily.

:)
Will Dockery
2019-05-12 16:45:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by General Zod
Post by Will Dockery
these two young ones
in the court across from me
they play Bob Dylan
all day and all night
on their stereo
they turn that stereo
as high as it can go
and it's a very good
stereo
but right now
it's Bob Dylan
Bob Dylan Bob
Dylan all the
way.
the whole neighborhood
gets Bob Dylan free
and I get him freest of all
because I live in the court
across the way
I get Dylan when I shit
I get Dylan when I fuck
and just before I try to sleep
sometimes I see them
outside on the sidewalk
quite young and neat
going out for food and
toilet paper
they are one of the loveliest
couples in the
neighborhood.
-- Charles Bukowski, 1976. Bob Dylan. Coldspring Journal # 10
Bukowski held a specific disdain for the work of Bob Dylan: "He’s only
written one good poem. But even that’s not very good. Something about trees
and all that […] it dips off at the end [his] words are common, but they’re
also very weak […] there’s a touch of melodrama that doesn’t quite ring
true." Although he uses the word “poem,” Bukowski is probably making
reference to Dylan’s lyrics rather than to the rambling free-association
verse contained in Tarantula, the singer’s collection of prose and poetry.
It is not surprising that Dylan’s lyrics were unpalatable to the “dirty
realist” poet of the street. “Mr Tambourine Man,” for example, is
essentially a non-linear stream of consciousness narrative open to multiple
interpretations. Where artists such as Dylan go wrong, suggests Bukowski, is
“ spend[ing] so much time talking about living that they don’t have time to
live.” In a letter to fellow poet Al Purdy, Bukowski claimed that when he
listens to classical music he feels “Dylan melting like a candle.”
-- Steve Brie, 2012. Watching the wall's dance: Charles Bukowski's musical
landscape. Magazine Americana January www.AmericanPopularCulture.com
Bukowski was a brilliant poet...……………...
You are sadly mistaken on both counts.
https://www.reddit.com/r/books/comments/58i0ic/kurt_vonnegut_in_1991_bob_dylan_is_the_worst_poet/
Kurt Vonnegut Jr. in 1991: “Bob Dylan Is the Worst Poet Alive”
:)
The dead swans lay in the stagnant pool.
They lay. They rotted. They turned
Around occasionally.
Bits of flesh dropped off them from
Time to time
And sank into the pool's mire.
They also smelt a great deal.
I suppose PPP needs an article on her, but I really don't want to do the research.
I see other Wiki bios on "Paula Nancy Millstone Jennings" which could be imported easily.

Of course, "Paul Neil Milne Johnstone" is the real life poet:

https://hitchhikers.fandom.com/wiki/Paul_Neil_Milne_Johnstone

:)
Zod
2019-05-12 21:35:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by General Zod
Post by Will Dockery
these two young ones
in the court across from me
they play Bob Dylan
all day and all night
on their stereo
they turn that stereo
as high as it can go
and it's a very good
stereo
but right now
it's Bob Dylan
Bob Dylan Bob
Dylan all the
way.
the whole neighborhood
gets Bob Dylan free
and I get him freest of all
because I live in the court
across the way
I get Dylan when I shit
I get Dylan when I fuck
and just before I try to sleep
sometimes I see them
outside on the sidewalk
quite young and neat
going out for food and
toilet paper
they are one of the loveliest
couples in the
neighborhood.
-- Charles Bukowski, 1976. Bob Dylan. Coldspring Journal # 10
Bukowski held a specific disdain for the work of Bob Dylan: "He’s only
written one good poem. But even that’s not very good. Something about trees
and all that […] it dips off at the end [his] words are common, but they’re
also very weak […] there’s a touch of melodrama that doesn’t quite ring
true." Although he uses the word “poem,” Bukowski is probably making
reference to Dylan’s lyrics rather than to the rambling free-association
verse contained in Tarantula, the singer’s collection of prose and poetry.
It is not surprising that Dylan’s lyrics were unpalatable to the “dirty
realist” poet of the street. “Mr Tambourine Man,” for example, is
essentially a non-linear stream of consciousness narrative open to multiple
interpretations. Where artists such as Dylan go wrong, suggests Bukowski, is
“ spend[ing] so much time talking about living that they don’t have time to
live.” In a letter to fellow poet Al Purdy, Bukowski claimed that when he
listens to classical music he feels “Dylan melting like a candle.”
-- Steve Brie, 2012. Watching the wall's dance: Charles Bukowski's musical
landscape. Magazine Americana January www.AmericanPopularCulture.com
Bukowski was a brilliant poet...……………...
You are sadly mistaken on both counts.
https://www.reddit.com/r/books/comments/58i0ic/kurt_vonnegut_in_1991_bob_dylan_is_the_worst_poet/
Kurt Vonnegut Jr. in 1991: “Bob Dylan Is the Worst Poet Alive”
:)
The dead swans lay in the stagnant pool.
They lay. They rotted. They turned
Around occasionally.
Bits of flesh dropped off them from
Time to time
And sank into the pool's mire.
They also smelt a great deal.
I suppose PPP needs an article on her, but I really don't want to do the research.
Interesting to say the least.....
Michael Pendragon
2019-05-13 00:27:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by General Zod
Post by Will Dockery
these two young ones
in the court across from me
they play Bob Dylan
all day and all night
on their stereo
they turn that stereo
as high as it can go
and it's a very good
stereo
but right now
it's Bob Dylan
Bob Dylan Bob
Dylan all the
way.
the whole neighborhood
gets Bob Dylan free
and I get him freest of all
because I live in the court
across the way
I get Dylan when I shit
I get Dylan when I fuck
and just before I try to sleep
sometimes I see them
outside on the sidewalk
quite young and neat
going out for food and
toilet paper
they are one of the loveliest
couples in the
neighborhood.
-- Charles Bukowski, 1976. Bob Dylan. Coldspring Journal # 10
Bukowski held a specific disdain for the work of Bob Dylan: "He’s only
written one good poem. But even that’s not very good. Something about trees
and all that […] it dips off at the end [his] words are common, but they’re
also very weak […] there’s a touch of melodrama that doesn’t quite ring
true." Although he uses the word “poem,” Bukowski is probably making
reference to Dylan’s lyrics rather than to the rambling free-association
verse contained in Tarantula, the singer’s collection of prose and poetry.
It is not surprising that Dylan’s lyrics were unpalatable to the “dirty
realist” poet of the street. “Mr Tambourine Man,” for example, is
essentially a non-linear stream of consciousness narrative open to multiple
interpretations. Where artists such as Dylan go wrong, suggests Bukowski, is
“ spend[ing] so much time talking about living that they don’t have time to
live.” In a letter to fellow poet Al Purdy, Bukowski claimed that when he
listens to classical music he feels “Dylan melting like a candle.”
-- Steve Brie, 2012. Watching the wall's dance: Charles Bukowski's musical
landscape. Magazine Americana January www.AmericanPopularCulture.com
Bukowski was a brilliant poet...……………...
You are sadly mistaken on both counts.
https://www.reddit.com/r/books/comments/58i0ic/kurt_vonnegut_in_1991_bob_dylan_is_the_worst_poet/
Kurt Vonnegut Jr. in 1991: “Bob Dylan Is the Worst Poet Alive”
:)
The dead swans lay in the stagnant pool.
They lay. They rotted. They turned
Around occasionally.
Bits of flesh dropped off them from
Time to time
And sank into the pool's mire.
They also smelt a great deal.
Well that stinks.
Will Dockery
2019-05-13 03:15:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by General Zod
Post by Will Dockery
these two young ones
in the court across from me
they play Bob Dylan
all day and all night
on their stereo
they turn that stereo
as high as it can go
and it's a very good
stereo
but right now
it's Bob Dylan
Bob Dylan Bob
Dylan all the
way.
the whole neighborhood
gets Bob Dylan free
and I get him freest of all
because I live in the court
across the way
I get Dylan when I shit
I get Dylan when I fuck
and just before I try to sleep
sometimes I see them
outside on the sidewalk
quite young and neat
going out for food and
toilet paper
they are one of the loveliest
couples in the
neighborhood.
-- Charles Bukowski, 1976. Bob Dylan. Coldspring Journal # 10
Bukowski held a specific disdain for the work of Bob Dylan: "He’s only
written one good poem. But even that’s not very good. Something about trees
and all that […] it dips off at the end [his] words are common, but they’re
also very weak […] there’s a touch of melodrama that doesn’t quite ring
true." Although he uses the word “poem,” Bukowski is probably making
reference to Dylan’s lyrics rather than to the rambling free-association
verse contained in Tarantula, the singer’s collection of prose and poetry.
It is not surprising that Dylan’s lyrics were unpalatable to the “dirty
realist” poet of the street. “Mr Tambourine Man,” for example, is
essentially a non-linear stream of consciousness narrative open to multiple
interpretations. Where artists such as Dylan go wrong, suggests Bukowski, is
“ spend[ing] so much time talking about living that they don’t have time to
live.” In a letter to fellow poet Al Purdy, Bukowski claimed that when he
listens to classical music he feels “Dylan melting like a candle.”
-- Steve Brie, 2012. Watching the wall's dance: Charles Bukowski's musical
landscape. Magazine Americana January www.AmericanPopularCulture.com
Bukowski was a brilliant poet...……………...
You are sadly mistaken on both counts.
https://www.reddit.com/r/books/comments/58i0ic/kurt_vonnegut_in_1991_bob_dylan_is_the_worst_poet/
Kurt Vonnegut Jr. in 1991: “Bob Dylan Is the Worst Poet Alive”
:)
The dead swans lay in the stagnant pool.
They lay. They rotted. They turned
Around occasionally.
Bits of flesh dropped off them from
Time to time
And sank into the pool's mire.
They also smelt a great deal.
Well that stinks.
No argument there.
Will Dockery
2019-05-13 06:32:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by General Zod
Post by Will Dockery
these two young ones
in the court across from me
they play Bob Dylan
all day and all night
on their stereo
they turn that stereo
as high as it can go
and it's a very good
stereo
but right now
it's Bob Dylan
Bob Dylan Bob
Dylan all the
way.
the whole neighborhood
gets Bob Dylan free
and I get him freest of all
because I live in the court
across the way
I get Dylan when I shit
I get Dylan when I fuck
and just before I try to sleep
sometimes I see them
outside on the sidewalk
quite young and neat
going out for food and
toilet paper
they are one of the loveliest
couples in the
neighborhood.
-- Charles Bukowski, 1976. Bob Dylan. Coldspring Journal # 10
Bukowski held a specific disdain for the work of Bob Dylan: "He’s only
written one good poem. But even that’s not very good. Something about trees
and all that […] it dips off at the end [his] words are common, but they’re
also very weak […] there’s a touch of melodrama that doesn’t quite ring
true." Although he uses the word “poem,” Bukowski is probably making
reference to Dylan’s lyrics rather than to the rambling free-association
verse contained in Tarantula, the singer’s collection of prose and poetry.
It is not surprising that Dylan’s lyrics were unpalatable to the “dirty
realist” poet of the street. “Mr Tambourine Man,” for example, is
essentially a non-linear stream of consciousness narrative open to multiple
interpretations. Where artists such as Dylan go wrong, suggests Bukowski, is
“ spend[ing] so much time talking about living that they don’t have time to
live.” In a letter to fellow poet Al Purdy, Bukowski claimed that when he
listens to classical music he feels “Dylan melting like a candle.”
-- Steve Brie, 2012. Watching the wall's dance: Charles Bukowski's musical
landscape. Magazine Americana January www.AmericanPopularCulture.com
Bukowski was a brilliant poet...……………...
You are sadly mistaken on both counts.
https://www.reddit.com/r/books/comments/58i0ic/kurt_vonnegut_in_1991_bob_dylan_is_the_worst_poet/
Kurt Vonnegut Jr. in 1991: “Bob Dylan Is the Worst Poet Alive”
It even took Jack Kerouac awhile to understand Dylan.
Zod
2019-05-14 03:35:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by General Zod
Post by Will Dockery
these two young ones
in the court across from me
they play Bob Dylan
all day and all night
on their stereo
they turn that stereo
as high as it can go
and it's a very good
stereo
but right now
it's Bob Dylan
Bob Dylan Bob
Dylan all the
way.
the whole neighborhood
gets Bob Dylan free
and I get him freest of all
because I live in the court
across the way
I get Dylan when I shit
I get Dylan when I fuck
and just before I try to sleep
sometimes I see them
outside on the sidewalk
quite young and neat
going out for food and
toilet paper
they are one of the loveliest
couples in the
neighborhood.
-- Charles Bukowski, 1976. Bob Dylan. Coldspring Journal # 10
Bukowski held a specific disdain for the work of Bob Dylan: "He’s only
written one good poem. But even that’s not very good. Something about trees
and all that […] it dips off at the end [his] words are common, but they’re
also very weak […] there’s a touch of melodrama that doesn’t quite ring
true." Although he uses the word “poem,” Bukowski is probably making
reference to Dylan’s lyrics rather than to the rambling free-association
verse contained in Tarantula, the singer’s collection of prose and poetry.
It is not surprising that Dylan’s lyrics were unpalatable to the “dirty
realist” poet of the street. “Mr Tambourine Man,” for example, is
essentially a non-linear stream of consciousness narrative open to multiple
interpretations. Where artists such as Dylan go wrong, suggests Bukowski, is
“ spend[ing] so much time talking about living that they don’t have time to
live.” In a letter to fellow poet Al Purdy, Bukowski claimed that when he
listens to classical music he feels “Dylan melting like a candle.”
-- Steve Brie, 2012. Watching the wall's dance: Charles Bukowski's musical
landscape. Magazine Americana January www.AmericanPopularCulture.com
Bukowski was a brilliant poet...……………...
You are sadly mistaken on both counts.
https://www.reddit.com/r/books/comments/58i0ic/kurt_vonnegut_in_1991_bob_dylan_is_the_worst_poet/
Kurt Vonnegut Jr. in 1991: “Bob Dylan Is the Worst Poet Alive”
It even took Jack Kerouac awhile to understand Dylan.
Interesting...

General Zod
2018-11-11 22:57:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
these two young ones
in the court across from me
they play Bob Dylan
all day and all night
on their stereo
they turn that stereo
as high as it can go
and it's a very good
stereo
but right now
it's Bob Dylan
Bob Dylan Bob
Dylan all the
way.
the whole neighborhood
gets Bob Dylan free
and I get him freest of all
because I live in the court
across the way
I get Dylan when I shit
I get Dylan when I fuck
and just before I try to sleep
sometimes I see them
outside on the sidewalk
quite young and neat
going out for food and
toilet paper
they are one of the loveliest
couples in the
neighborhood.
-- Charles Bukowski, 1976. Bob Dylan. Coldspring Journal # 10
Bukowski held a specific disdain for the work of Bob Dylan: "He’s only
written one good poem. But even that’s not very good. Something about trees
and all that […] it dips off at the end [his] words are common, but they’re
also very weak […] there’s a touch of melodrama that doesn’t quite ring
true." Although he uses the word “poem,” Bukowski is probably making
reference to Dylan’s lyrics rather than to the rambling free-association
verse contained in Tarantula, the singer’s collection of prose and poetry.
It is not surprising that Dylan’s lyrics were unpalatable to the “dirty
realist” poet of the street. “Mr Tambourine Man,” for example, is
essentially a non-linear stream of consciousness narrative open to multiple
interpretations. Where artists such as Dylan go wrong, suggests Bukowski, is
“ spend[ing] so much time talking about living that they don’t have time to
live.” In a letter to fellow poet Al Purdy, Bukowski claimed that when he
listens to classical music he feels “Dylan melting like a candle.”
-- Steve Brie, 2012. Watching the wall's dance: Charles Bukowski's musical
landscape. Magazine Americana January www.AmericanPopularCulture.com
Good for a new read...…………….
General Zod
2018-12-29 03:33:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
these two young ones
in the court across from me
they play Bob Dylan
all day and all night
on their stereo
they turn that stereo
as high as it can go
and it's a very good
stereo
but right now
it's Bob Dylan
Bob Dylan Bob
Dylan all the
way.
the whole neighborhood
gets Bob Dylan free
and I get him freest of all
because I live in the court
across the way
I get Dylan when I shit
I get Dylan when I fuck
and just before I try to sleep
sometimes I see them
outside on the sidewalk
quite young and neat
going out for food and
toilet paper
they are one of the loveliest
couples in the
neighborhood.
-- Charles Bukowski, 1976. Bob Dylan. Coldspring Journal # 10
Bukowski held a specific disdain for the work of Bob Dylan: "He’s only
written one good poem. But even that’s not very good. Something about trees
and all that […] it dips off at the end [his] words are common, but they’re
also very weak […] there’s a touch of melodrama that doesn’t quite ring
true." Although he uses the word “poem,” Bukowski is probably making
reference to Dylan’s lyrics rather than to the rambling free-association
verse contained in Tarantula, the singer’s collection of prose and poetry.
It is not surprising that Dylan’s lyrics were unpalatable to the “dirty
realist” poet of the street. “Mr Tambourine Man,” for example, is
essentially a non-linear stream of consciousness narrative open to multiple
interpretations. Where artists such as Dylan go wrong, suggests Bukowski, is
“ spend[ing] so much time talking about living that they don’t have time to
live.” In a letter to fellow poet Al Purdy, Bukowski claimed that when he
listens to classical music he feels “Dylan melting like a candle.”
-- Steve Brie, 2012. Watching the wall's dance: Charles Bukowski's musical
landscape. Magazine Americana January www.AmericanPopularCulture.com
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Wow, great find, Stephan.
:)
Outstanding...…………..
Will Dockery
2018-02-05 05:36:09 UTC
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A small part of a great piece on Jack Kerouac:

http://www.theguardian.com/film/2012/oct/07/on-the-road-mark-ellen

"...The key torch-bearer is Bob Dylan. "On the Road had been like a bible
for me," he said in his memoir Chronicles: Volume One. "I loved the
breathless, dynamic bop poetry phrases that flowed from Jack's pen," and the
way the author was magnetically drawn to 'the mad people – the ones who were
mad to live, mad to talk, mad to be saved, desirous of everything at the
same time, the ones who never yawn. And I felt like I fit right into that
bunch.' The cast of grotesques in Dylan's Desolation Row is all the verve
and lunacy of On the Road compressed into 11 minutes 21 seconds."

And in turn led a million others of us roaring down that road.
General Zod
2018-11-08 09:28:04 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
http://www.theguardian.com/film/2012/oct/07/on-the-road-mark-ellen
"...The key torch-bearer is Bob Dylan. "On the Road had been like a bible
for me," he said in his memoir Chronicles: Volume One. "I loved the
breathless, dynamic bop poetry phrases that flowed from Jack's pen," and the
way the author was magnetically drawn to 'the mad people – the ones who were
mad to live, mad to talk, mad to be saved, desirous of everything at the
same time, the ones who never yawn. And I felt like I fit right into that
bunch.' The cast of grotesques in Dylan's Desolation Row is all the verve
and lunacy of On the Road compressed into 11 minutes 21 seconds."
And in turn led a million others of us roaring down that road.
That is mighty fine reading...……………...
Will Dockery
2018-11-08 19:47:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
http://www.theguardian.com/film/2012/oct/07/on-the-road-mark-ellen
Post by General Zod
Post by Will Dockery
"...The key torch-bearer is Bob Dylan. "On the Road had been like a bible
for me," he said in his memoir Chronicles: Volume One. "I loved the
breathless, dynamic bop poetry phrases that flowed from Jack's pen," and the
way the author was magnetically drawn to 'the mad people – the ones who were
mad to live, mad to talk, mad to be saved, desirous of everything at the
same time, the ones who never yawn. And I felt like I fit right into that
bunch.' The cast of grotesques in Dylan's Desolation Row is all the verve
and lunacy of On the Road compressed into 11 minutes 21 seconds."
And in turn led a million others of us roaring down that road.
That is mighty fine reading...……………...
All the icons come together for a Doo-Nanny of a summit meeting sort of thing.
Will Dockery
2018-02-20 03:16:37 UTC
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Permalink
then try not looking into a mirror...
I have fewer wrinkles than Dylan. With all that money he could have
bought a good moisturizer.
Are you the same age as Dylan, though?
Will Dockery
2018-03-17 02:32:27 UTC
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Permalink
Shunning is a high art.
then try not looking into a mirror...you remain a petulant fraud
One of so many...
Will Dockery
2018-04-19 08:29:53 UTC
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Permalink
Well, so Bob Dylan attempted to pay Bukowski a visit at some point, but
Buk couldn't be bothered.
Shunning is a high art.
This has to be a good story... anyone have details?
Good Time Charley
2018-11-06 18:25:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Well, so Bob Dylan attempted to pay Bukowski a visit at some point, but
Buk couldn't be bothered.
Shunning is a high art.
This has to be a good story... anyone have details?
Old Buk.........
Will Dockery
2018-11-02 17:27:45 UTC
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Permalink
Stephan Pickering wrote in message news:96eb5a3f-9049-4619-b9e5-***@googlegroups.com...

these two young ones
in the court across from me
they play Bob Dylan
all day and all night
on their stereo

they turn that stereo
as high as it can go
and it's a very good
stereo

but right now
it's Bob Dylan
Bob Dylan Bob
Dylan all the
way.


the whole neighborhood
gets Bob Dylan free

and I get him freest of all
because I live in the court
across the way

I get Dylan when I shit
I get Dylan when I fuck
and just before I try to sleep

sometimes I see them
outside on the sidewalk
quite young and neat
going out for food and
toilet paper

they are one of the loveliest
couples in the
neighborhood.
-- Charles Bukowski, 1976. Bob Dylan. Coldspring Journal # 10

Bukowski held a specific disdain for the work of Bob Dylan: "He’s only
written one good poem. But even that’s not very good. Something about trees
and all that […] it dips off at the end [his] words are common, but they’re
also very weak […] there’s a touch of melodrama that doesn’t quite ring
true." Although he uses the word “poem,” Bukowski is probably making
reference to Dylan’s lyrics rather than to the rambling free-association
verse contained in Tarantula, the singer’s collection of prose and poetry.
It is not surprising that Dylan’s lyrics were unpalatable to the “dirty
realist” poet of the street. “Mr Tambourine Man,” for example, is
essentially a non-linear stream of consciousness narrative open to multiple
interpretations. Where artists such as Dylan go wrong, suggests Bukowski, is
“ spend[ing] so much time talking about living that they don’t have time to
live.” In a letter to fellow poet Al Purdy, Bukowski claimed that when he
listens to classical music he feels “Dylan melting like a candle.”
-- Steve Brie, 2012. Watching the wall's dance: Charles Bukowski's musical
landscape. Magazine Americana January www.AmericanPopularCulture.com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
STEPHAN PICKERING / חפץ ח"ם בן אברהם
Torah אלילה Yehu'di Apikores / Philologia Kabbalistica Speculativa
Researcher
לחיות זמן רב ולשגשג

THE KABBALAH FRACTALS PROJECT

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Interesting addition to the Bukowski discussion, Stephan.

:)
Will Dockery
2018-11-03 01:06:22 UTC
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What, no slobbering slurp for this one, Pendragon?

I mean, Bukowski AND Dylan... how can you resist?

😀
Will Dockery
2018-11-04 06:37:05 UTC
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Agreed, Bukowski had some brilliant moves.
Good Time Charley
2018-11-04 06:41:52 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Agreed, Bukowski had some brilliant moves.
Yes, indeed he was madman and an artist...………...
Will Dockery
2018-11-04 23:58:01 UTC
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A genuine poet, old Bukowski.
General Zod
2018-11-05 07:06:10 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Well, so Bob Dylan attempted to pay Bukowski a visit at some point, but
Buk couldn't be bothered.
Shunning is a high art.
Buk was a lover of classical music, folk and rock didn't interest him much.
Yap...………….
General Zod
2018-11-08 21:24:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Well, so Bob Dylan attempted to pay Bukowski a visit at some point, but
Buk couldn't be bothered.
Shunning is a high art.
Buk was a lover of classical music, folk and rock didn't interest him much.
Yes look at Barfly..................
Good Time Charley
2018-11-09 02:49:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Well, so Bob Dylan attempted to pay Bukowski a visit at some point, but
Buk couldn't be bothered.
Shunning is a high art.
Buk was a lover of classical music, folk and rock didn't interest him much.
Barfly was where I discovered od Buk...………..
Will Dockery
2018-11-09 15:51:45 UTC
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Permalink
I might try that, since I did think it would be helpful putting together review of a poem aka critique.
Good Time Charley
2018-11-11 04:40:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Well, so Bob Dylan attempted to pay Bukowski a visit at some point, but
Buk couldn't be bothered.
Shunning is a high art.
Buk was a lover of classical music, folk and rock didn't interest him much.
Yes he lobed his music...............
Michael Pendragon
2018-11-11 05:38:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Good Time Charley
Post by Will Dockery
Well, so Bob Dylan attempted to pay Bukowski a visit at some point, but
Buk couldn't be bothered.
Shunning is a high art.
Buk was a lover of classical music, folk and rock didn't interest him much.
Yes he lobed his music...............
Interesting verb choice ... however, we don't actually hear with our ear lobes.

Of course, I'm no Buk scholar. Perhaps he wore a pair of Beethoven cameos as earrings?
Will Dockery
2019-02-24 22:32:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Well, so Bob Dylan attempted to pay Bukowski a visit at some point, but
Buk couldn't be bothered.
Shunning is a high art.
Buk was a lover of classical music, folk and rock didn't interest him much.

Found in my Drafts file, may already be in the thread...
Will Dockery
2019-03-20 07:13:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Well, so Bob Dylan attempted to pay Bukowski a visit at some point, but
Buk couldn't be bothered.
Shunning is a high art.
Buk was a lover of classical music, folk and rock didn't interest him much.
Found in my Drafts file, may already be in the thread...
=====

Reading Bukowski turned me on to Mahler...

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Excellent, any favorites I might go for on YouTube?
Zod
2019-05-12 04:14:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
Well, so Bob Dylan attempted to pay Bukowski a visit at some point, but
Buk couldn't be bothered.
Shunning is a high art.
Buk was a lover of classical music, folk and rock didn't interest him much.
Found in my Drafts file, may already be in the thread...
=====
Reading Bukowski turned me on to Mahler...
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
Excellent, any favorites I might go for on YouTube?
Two of the best modern poets Buk and Dylan.....
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