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Deep Blue Sassafras / Will Dockery
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Will Dockery
2018-05-25 16:11:55 UTC
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Interesting trivia, in real life, Charles Laughton was married to Elsa Lancaster.

Get that image:

Quasimodo married to the Bride of Frankenstein.

👍
Chafetz Chayim haYehu'di
2018-05-25 16:18:34 UTC
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On Friday, May 25, 2018 at 4:27:28 AM UTC-7, PaedoBarney cannot ask questions...
Do yourself a favour. Everyone, for years, has know you are a bullshitting goy. Why don't you withdraw your presence. You are never taken seriously with your juvenile cartoonish mentality.
You haven't answered my question, Pick.
Shalom & Boker tov, everyone...My statement stands. PaedoBarney's mental bankruptcy, fascism, and autocoprophagia continue unabated. These are noted, ignored, archived.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
STEPHAN PICKERING / חפץ ח"ם בן אברהם
Torah אלילה Yehu'di Apikores / Philologia Kabbalistica Speculativa Researcher
לחיות זמן רב ולשגשג...לעולם לא עוד
THE KABBALAH FRACTALS PROJECT
לעולם לא אשכח

IN PROGRESS: Shabtai Zisel benAvraham v'Rachel Riva:
davening in the musematic dark
m***@gmail.com
2018-05-25 16:36:18 UTC
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Post by Chafetz Chayim haYehu'di
On Friday, May 25, 2018 at 4:27:28 AM UTC-7, PaedoBarney cannot ask questions...
Do yourself a favour. Everyone, for years, has know you are a bullshitting goy. Why don't you withdraw your presence. You are never taken seriously with your juvenile cartoonish mentality.
You haven't answered my question, Pick.
Shalom & Boker tov, everyone...My statement stands. PaedoBarney's mental bankruptcy, fascism, and autocoprophagia continue unabated. These are noted, ignored, archived.
Yeah, I'm sure by now we've all forgotten that you still haven't answered my question, Pick.
Chafetz Chayim haYehu'di
2018-05-25 17:05:40 UTC
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On Friday, May 25, 2018 at 9:36:19 AM UTC-7, PaedoDaemon does not have an inquiring mind...
Post by m***@gmail.com
Post by Chafetz Chayim haYehu'di
Shalom & Boker tov, everyone...My statement stands. PaedoBarney's mental bankruptcy, fascism, and autocoprophagia continue unabated. These are noted, ignored, archived.
Yeah, I'm sure by now we've all forgotten that you still haven't answered my question, Pick.
Shalom & Boker tov, everyone...PaedoBarney's constant whining is ignored. I do not answer questions from disgraced, white supremacist, lying, opus dei trash.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
STEPHAN PICKERING / חפץ ח"ם בן אברהם
Torah אלילה Yehu'di Apikores / Philologia Kabbalistica Speculativa Researcher
לחיות זמן רב ולשגשג...לעולם לא עוד
THE KABBALAH FRACTALS PROJECT
לעולם לא אשכח

IN PROGRESS: Shabtai Zisel benAvraham v'Rachel Riva:
davening in the musematic dark
m***@gmail.com
2018-05-25 17:09:40 UTC
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Post by Chafetz Chayim haYehu'di
On Friday, May 25, 2018 at 9:36:19 AM UTC-7, PaedoDaemon does not have an inquiring mind...
Post by m***@gmail.com
Post by Chafetz Chayim haYehu'di
Shalom & Boker tov, everyone...My statement stands. PaedoBarney's mental bankruptcy, fascism, and autocoprophagia continue unabated. These are noted, ignored, archived.
Yeah, I'm sure by now we've all forgotten that you still haven't answered my question, Pick.
Shalom & Boker tov, everyone...PaedoBarney's constant whining is ignored. I do not answer questions from disgraced, white supremacist, lying, opus dei trash.
You don't answer questions from anybody, Pick. What are you trying to hide?
Chafetz Chayim haYehu'di
2018-05-25 18:43:18 UTC
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On Friday, May 25, 2018 at 10:09:41 AM UTC-7, PaedoBarney grovels...
Post by Chafetz Chayim haYehu'di
Post by Chafetz Chayim haYehu'di
Shalom & Boker tov, everyone...My statement stands. PaedoBarney's mental bankruptcy, fascism, and autocoprophagia continue unabated. These are noted, ignored, archived.
Shalom & Boker tov, everyone...PaedoBarney's constant whining is ignored. I do not answer questions from disgraced, white supremacist, lying, opus dei trash.
I 'hide' nothing. PsychoPaedoDaemonicBarney remains what my statements outline.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
STEPHAN PICKERING / חפץ ח"ם בן אברהם
Torah אלילה Yehu'di Apikores / Philologia Kabbalistica Speculativa Researcher
לחיות זמן רב ולשגשג...לעולם לא עוד
THE KABBALAH FRACTALS PROJECT
לעולם לא אשכח

IN PROGRESS: Shabtai Zisel benAvraham v'Rachel Riva:
davening in the musematic dark
m***@gmail.com
2018-05-25 18:54:41 UTC
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Post by Chafetz Chayim haYehu'di
On Friday, May 25, 2018 at 10:09:41 AM UTC-7, PaedoBarney grovels...
Post by Chafetz Chayim haYehu'di
Post by Chafetz Chayim haYehu'di
Shalom & Boker tov, everyone...My statement stands. PaedoBarney's mental bankruptcy, fascism, and autocoprophagia continue unabated. These are noted, ignored, archived.
Shalom & Boker tov, everyone...PaedoBarney's constant whining is ignored. I do not answer questions from disgraced, white supremacist, lying, opus dei trash.
I 'hide' nothing.
Yes you do.

If you had nothing to hide, you'd have answered my question.
Chafetz Chayim haYehu'di
2018-05-25 19:26:54 UTC
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On Friday, May 25, 2018 at 11:54:42 AM UTC-7, PaedoBarney's ESL difficulties...
Post by Chafetz Chayim haYehu'di
On Friday, May 25, 2018 at 10:09:41 AM UTC-7, PaedoBarney grovels...
Post by Chafetz Chayim haYehu'di
Post by Chafetz Chayim haYehu'di
Shalom & Boker tov, everyone...My statement stands. PaedoBarney's mental bankruptcy, fascism, and autocoprophagia continue unabated. These are noted, ignored, archived.
Shalom & Boker tov, everyone...PaedoBarney's constant whining is ignored. I do not answer questions from disgraced, white supremacist, lying, opus dei trash.
I 'hide' nothing.
Again, I do not discuss ideas or reality with his kind of fascist trash.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
STEPHAN PICKERING / חפץ ח"ם בן אברהם
Torah אלילה Yehu'di Apikores / Philologia Kabbalistica Speculativa Researcher
לחיות זמן רב ולשגשג...לעולם לא עוד
THE KABBALAH FRACTALS PROJECT
לעולם לא אשכח

IN PROGRESS: Shabtai Zisel benAvraham v'Rachel Riva:
davening in the musematic dark
Will Dockery
2018-05-25 19:40:19 UTC
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Indeed, Stephan, this is a poetry group, personal questions are off topic.

👍
h***@gmail.com
2018-05-25 19:47:36 UTC
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So discussing ideas or reality
is off topic as far as you two
are concerned. Got it. Good to
know. That explains a lot.
Will Dockery
2018-05-25 20:38:16 UTC
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No, Corey, not reality, really, but personal details such as family and real life details are inappropriate here, on a poetry group.
h***@gmail.com
2018-05-25 20:52:01 UTC
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So you decide what's appropriate for you,
and leave other people to make decisions
for themselves. How about that? Snort. Ugh.
Will Dockery
2018-05-31 14:00:05 UTC
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Post by h***@gmail.com
So you decide what's appropriate for you,
and leave other people to make decisions
for themselves. How about that? Snort. Ugh.
That seems to be a concept we all need to work on.

:)
Michael Pendragon
2018-05-31 14:05:33 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Post by h***@gmail.com
So you decide what's appropriate for you,
and leave other people to make decisions
for themselves. How about that? Snort. Ugh.
That seems to be a concept we all need to work on.
Fuck off, Will.
Michael Pendragon
2018-05-26 02:04:13 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Indeed, Stephan, this is a poetry group, personal questions are off topic.
But personal insults are not?
m***@gmail.com
2018-05-25 16:35:33 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Interesting trivia, in real life, Charles Laughton was married to Elsa Lancaster.
You just found this out???
Will Dockery
2018-05-25 16:49:53 UTC
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Post by m***@gmail.com
Post by Will Dockery
Interesting trivia, in real life, Charles Laughton was married to Elsa Lancaster.
You just found this out???
No, but I didn't know much about Charles Laughton until somewhat recently.

I found one of his movies on DVD last night, "Captain Kidd", at a local used media store:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Captain_Kidd_(film)

"Captain Kidd is a 1945 adventure film starring Charles Laughton, Randolph Scott and Barbara Britton. It was directed by Rowland V. Lee and produced by Benedict Bogeaus and James Nasser. The music was conducted by Werner Janssen. The film was released by United Artists. It has entered the public domain because the producers neglected to renew the copyright in 1972..."

I haven't watched it yet, but it is good to have in the collection.
m***@gmail.com
2018-05-25 16:59:54 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Post by m***@gmail.com
Post by Will Dockery
Interesting trivia, in real life, Charles Laughton was married to Elsa Lancaster.
You just found this out???
No, but I didn't know much about Charles Laughton until somewhat recently.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Captain_Kidd_(film)
"Captain Kidd is a 1945 adventure film starring Charles Laughton, Randolph Scott and Barbara Britton. It was directed by Rowland V. Lee and produced by Benedict Bogeaus and James Nasser. The music was conducted by Werner Janssen. The film was released by United Artists. It has entered the public domain because the producers neglected to renew the copyright in 1972..."
I haven't watched it yet, but it is good to have in the collection.
It's a rather forgettable "B" film.
Will Dockery
2018-05-25 17:07:37 UTC
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Post by m***@gmail.com
It's a rather forgettable "B" film.
The Charles Laughton film I really look forward to finding is The Beachcomber aka Vessel of Wrath:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vessel_of_Wrath

"Vessel of Wrath is a 1938 British film directed by Erich Pommer, and produced by Pommer and starring Charles Laughton and Elsa Lanchester. It was based on the Somerset Maugham short story "The Vessel of Wrath". The film is also known as The Beachcomber in the US...."
Will Dockery
2018-05-25 18:41:18 UTC
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The main point is that the Hunchback of Notre Dame is considered one of the Universal Pictures "monsters", as is the Phantom of the Opera, Dracula, and so on.
Michael Pendragon
2018-05-26 02:03:35 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
The main point is that the Hunchback of Notre Dame is considered one of the Universal Pictures "monsters", as is the Phantom of the Opera, Dracula, and so on.
Not really.

The Lon Chaney version is considered, first and foremost, as a Lon Chaney film. Despite having been filmed at Universal, Chaney films constitute their own sub-genre.

It's technically considered a horror film, although it really doesn't fit the genre format; and, unlike horror, is adapted from a rather boring novel (French literature) by Victor Hugo. And, at least when I was a kid, we sometimes referred to horror films as "monster movies," so speaking in an extremely broad sense, "The Hunchback of Notre Dame" is a monster movie.

However, the "Universal Monsters" generally refers to the quartet of monsters who appeared in franchise films throughout the 1930s and 40s: Frankenstein (The Monster), The Wolf Man, Dracula, and The Mummy.

The Hunchback, Quasimodo, was certainly not a monster. He was a physically deformed man who'd been abandoned as a baby and raised by the clergy at Notre Dame Cathedral.

That said, I think Hunchback poetry would qualify for this week's Sampler.
Cujo DeSockpuppet
2018-05-26 02:36:19 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
The main point is that the Hunchback of Notre Dame is considered one
of t
he Universal Pictures "monsters", as is the Phantom of the Opera,
Dracula, and so on.
Not really.
The Lon Chaney version is considered, first and foremost, as a Lon
Chaney film. Despite having been filmed at Universal, Chaney films
constitute their own sub-genre.
It's technically considered a horror film, although it really doesn't
fit the genre format; and, unlike horror, is adapted from a rather
boring novel (French literature) by Victor Hugo. And, at least when I
was a kid, we sometimes referred to horror films as "monster movies,"
so speaking in an extremely broad sense, "The Hunchback of Notre Dame"
is a monster movie.
However, the "Universal Monsters" generally refers to the quartet of
Frankenstein (The Monster), The Wolf Man, Dracula, and The Mummy.
The Hunchback, Quasimodo, was certainly not a monster. He was a
physically deformed man who'd been abandoned as a baby and raised by
the clergy at Notre Dame Cathedral.
That said, I think Hunchback poetry would qualify for this week's Sampler.
How about Torgo? Or The Master?

Before you ask, I'm planning on doing Torgo.

http://www.jophan.org/mimosa/m18/brandt.htm

"What kind of movie would a fertilizer salesman from El Paso, Texas
make?" -- Michael Weldon, The Psychotronic Encyclopedia of Film
--
Cujo - The Official Overseer of Kooks and Trolls in dfw.*,
alt.paranormal, alt.astrology and alt.astrology.metapsych. Supreme Holy
Overlord of alt.fucknozzles. Winner of the 8/2000, 2/2003 & 4/2007 HL&S
award. July 2005 Hammer of Thor. Winning Trainer - Barbara Woodhouse
Memorial Dog Whistle - 12/2005 & 4/2008. COOSN-266-06-01895.
"And again, anyone who believes they have THE answers, is suffering from
delusions of granduer, a liar, a fool, and lacking in mature
perspectives."
- Edmo in self-diagnosis mode.
Michael Pendragon
2018-05-26 02:47:10 UTC
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Post by Cujo DeSockpuppet
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
The main point is that the Hunchback of Notre Dame is considered one
of t
he Universal Pictures "monsters", as is the Phantom of the Opera,
Dracula, and so on.
Not really.
The Lon Chaney version is considered, first and foremost, as a Lon
Chaney film. Despite having been filmed at Universal, Chaney films
constitute their own sub-genre.
It's technically considered a horror film, although it really doesn't
fit the genre format; and, unlike horror, is adapted from a rather
boring novel (French literature) by Victor Hugo. And, at least when I
was a kid, we sometimes referred to horror films as "monster movies,"
so speaking in an extremely broad sense, "The Hunchback of Notre Dame"
is a monster movie.
However, the "Universal Monsters" generally refers to the quartet of
Frankenstein (The Monster), The Wolf Man, Dracula, and The Mummy.
The Hunchback, Quasimodo, was certainly not a monster. He was a
physically deformed man who'd been abandoned as a baby and raised by
the clergy at Notre Dame Cathedral.
That said, I think Hunchback poetry would qualify for this week's Sampler.
How about Torgo? Or The Master?
If they're in movies and considered "monsters," they should be good to go.
Post by Cujo DeSockpuppet
Before you ask, I'm planning on doing Torgo.
http://www.jophan.org/mimosa/m18/brandt.htm
"What kind of movie would a fertilizer salesman from El Paso, Texas
make?" -- Michael Weldon, The Psychotronic Encyclopedia of Film
That was the first film book I'd ever come across that mentioned "Moonchild."
Will Dockery
2018-05-28 03:09:00 UTC
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Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Cujo DeSockpuppet
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
The main point is that the Hunchback of Notre Dame is considered one
of t
he Universal Pictures "monsters", as is the Phantom of the Opera,
Dracula, and so on.
Not really.
The Lon Chaney version is considered, first and foremost, as a Lon
Chaney film. Despite having been filmed at Universal, Chaney films
constitute their own sub-genre.
It's technically considered a horror film, although it really doesn't
fit the genre format; and, unlike horror, is adapted from a rather
boring novel (French literature) by Victor Hugo. And, at least when I
was a kid, we sometimes referred to horror films as "monster movies,"
so speaking in an extremely broad sense, "The Hunchback of Notre Dame"
is a monster movie.
However, the "Universal Monsters" generally refers to the quartet of
Frankenstein (The Monster), The Wolf Man, Dracula, and The Mummy.
The Hunchback, Quasimodo, was certainly not a monster. He was a
physically deformed man who'd been abandoned as a baby and raised by
the clergy at Notre Dame Cathedral.
That said, I think Hunchback poetry would qualify for this week's Sampler.
How about Torgo? Or The Master?
If they're in movies and considered "monsters," they should be good to go.
Post by Cujo DeSockpuppet
Before you ask, I'm planning on doing Torgo.
http://www.jophan.org/mimosa/m18/brandt.htm
"What kind of movie would a fertilizer salesman from El Paso, Texas
make?" -- Michael Weldon, The Psychotronic Encyclopedia of Film
That was the first film book I'd ever come across that mentioned "Moonchild."
I'm finishing mine up now, to be posted as a stand-alone post/thread.
General Zod
2019-01-31 10:35:04 UTC
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Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
The main point is that the Hunchback of Notre Dame is considered one of the Universal Pictures "monsters", as is the Phantom of the Opera, Dracula, and so on.
Not really.
The Lon Chaney version is considered, first and foremost, as a Lon Chaney film. Despite having been filmed at Universal, Chaney films constitute their own sub-genre.
It's technically considered a horror film, although it really doesn't fit the genre format; and, unlike horror, is adapted from a rather boring novel (French literature) by Victor Hugo. And, at least when I was a kid, we sometimes referred to horror films as "monster movies," so speaking in an extremely broad sense, "The Hunchback of Notre Dame" is a monster movie.
However, the "Universal Monsters" generally refers to the quartet of monsters who appeared in franchise films throughout the 1930s and 40s: Frankenstein (The Monster), The Wolf Man, Dracula, and The Mummy.
The Hunchback, Quasimodo, was certainly not a monster. He was a physically deformed man who'd been abandoned as a baby and raised by the clergy at Notre Dame Cathedral.
That said, I think Hunchback poetry would qualify for this week's Sampler.
In some ways you are off base........
Michael Pendragon
2019-01-31 14:24:35 UTC
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Post by General Zod
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
The main point is that the Hunchback of Notre Dame is considered one of the Universal Pictures "monsters", as is the Phantom of the Opera, Dracula, and so on.
Not really.
The Lon Chaney version is considered, first and foremost, as a Lon Chaney film. Despite having been filmed at Universal, Chaney films constitute their own sub-genre.
It's technically considered a horror film, although it really doesn't fit the genre format; and, unlike horror, is adapted from a rather boring novel (French literature) by Victor Hugo. And, at least when I was a kid, we sometimes referred to horror films as "monster movies," so speaking in an extremely broad sense, "The Hunchback of Notre Dame" is a monster movie.
However, the "Universal Monsters" generally refers to the quartet of monsters who appeared in franchise films throughout the 1930s and 40s: Frankenstein (The Monster), The Wolf Man, Dracula, and The Mummy.
The Hunchback, Quasimodo, was certainly not a monster. He was a physically deformed man who'd been abandoned as a baby and raised by the clergy at Notre Dame Cathedral.
That said, I think Hunchback poetry would qualify for this week's Sampler.
In some ways you are off base........
In what ways, Did? (Be specific.)
Will Dockery™
2019-01-31 16:17:53 UTC
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?
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by General Zod
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
The main point is that the Hunchback of Notre Dame is considered one of the Universal Pictures "monsters", as is the Phantom of the Opera, Dracula, and so on.
Not really.
The Lon Chaney version is considered, first and foremost, as a Lon Chaney film. Despite having been filmed at Universal, Chaney films constitute their own sub-genre.
It's technically considered a horror film, although it really doesn't fit the genre format; and, unlike horror, is adapted from a rather boring novel (French literature) by Victor Hugo. And, at least when I was a kid, we sometimes referred to horror films as "monster movies," so speaking in an extremely broad sense, "The Hunchback of Notre Dame" is a monster movie.
However, the "Universal Monsters" generally refers to the quartet of monsters who appeared in franchise films throughout the 1930s and 40s: Frankenstein (The Monster), The Wolf Man, Dracula, and The Mummy.
The Hunchback, Quasimodo, was certainly not a monster. He was a physically deformed man who'd been abandoned as a baby and raised by the clergy at Notre Dame Cathedral.
That said, I think Hunchback poetry would qualify for this week's Sampler.
In some ways you are off base........
In what ways, Did? (Be specific.)
Not really, except that The Hunchback of Notre Dame, made in 1923, is considered the start of what "would be the first of a series of films that for more than the next three decades would..." be known as the Universal Monsters.

http://www.unmuseum.org/umonsters.htm

"...Universal's first brush with monsters came in 1922. Lon Chaney was a well-known actor... he obtained the film rights to the Hunchback story with the intention of playing the sympathetic monster, Quasimodo, himself... It set the standard for future horror films and set a course forward for Universal into the monster movie business [...] Carl Laemmle was not really a fan of horror films, but after the triumph of Hunchback and Phantom, it was difficult for him to argue with success, His son, Carl Laemmle, Jr., was able to convince him to move forward with Dracula [...] Despite the earlier accomplishments of Hunchback and Phantom, Universal was nervous about the success of Dracula..."

So, although you make good points, "Lon Chaney played the first of Universal's monsters in the 1925 Hunchback of Notre Dame..."
General Zod
2019-02-01 00:32:45 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery™
?
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by General Zod
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
The main point is that the Hunchback of Notre Dame is considered one of the Universal Pictures "monsters", as is the Phantom of the Opera, Dracula, and so on.
Not really.
The Lon Chaney version is considered, first and foremost, as a Lon Chaney film. Despite having been filmed at Universal, Chaney films constitute their own sub-genre.
It's technically considered a horror film, although it really doesn't fit the genre format; and, unlike horror, is adapted from a rather boring novel (French literature) by Victor Hugo. And, at least when I was a kid, we sometimes referred to horror films as "monster movies," so speaking in an extremely broad sense, "The Hunchback of Notre Dame" is a monster movie.
However, the "Universal Monsters" generally refers to the quartet of monsters who appeared in franchise films throughout the 1930s and 40s: Frankenstein (The Monster), The Wolf Man, Dracula, and The Mummy.
The Hunchback, Quasimodo, was certainly not a monster. He was a physically deformed man who'd been abandoned as a baby and raised by the clergy at Notre Dame Cathedral.
That said, I think Hunchback poetry would qualify for this week's Sampler.
In some ways you are off base........
In what ways, Did? (Be specific.)
Not really, except that The Hunchback of Notre Dame, made in 1923, is considered the start of what "would be the first of a series of films that for more than the next three decades would..." be known as the Universal Monsters.
http://www.unmuseum.org/umonsters.htm
"...Universal's first brush with monsters came in 1922. Lon Chaney was a well-known actor... he obtained the film rights to the Hunchback story with the intention of playing the sympathetic monster, Quasimodo, himself... It set the standard for future horror films and set a course forward for Universal into the monster movie business [...] Carl Laemmle was not really a fan of horror films, but after the triumph of Hunchback and Phantom, it was difficult for him to argue with success, His son, Carl Laemmle, Jr., was able to convince him to move forward with Dracula [...] Despite the earlier accomplishments of Hunchback and Phantom, Universal was nervous about the success of Dracula..."
So, although you make good points, "Lon Chaney played the first of Universal's monsters in the 1925 Hunchback of Notre Dame..."
The article you've quoted from is ill-informed.
https://kingsofscreams.com/the-penalty/
"Hunchback" tells the story of a deformed man is shunned by the world. The hunchback is a far more sympathetic character than Chaney typically played.
Nor is Quasimodo one of "The Universal Monsters." The Universal Monsters, as previously noted, are a franchise that Universal reused throughout the 30s and 40s. They are The Frankenstein Monster, Dracula, The Mummy, The Invisible Man, The Wolf Man, and in the 1950s, The Creature from the Black Lagoon.
https://www.bfi.org.uk/news-opinion/news-bfi/features/where-begin-universal-horror-cycle
It notes the Chaney films, but (correctly) begins the "cycle" with "Frankenstein."
Dracula was first.......

http://www.unmuseum.org/umonsters.htm

Dracula

The next horror film released by Universal was Dracula, based on the 1897 book by Bram Stoker and a 1924 stage play by Hamilton Deane and John L. Balderston. Ironically, Carl Laemmle was not really a fan of horror films, but after the triumph of Hunchback and Phantom, it was difficult for him to argue with success, His son, Carl Laemmle, Jr., was able to convince him to move forward with the vampire picture. The elder Laemmle was also not a fan of Bela Lugosi who had played the Count in the stage play. Despite this Lugosi mangaged to get the part by ardently campaigning for it, and lowering his pay to just $500 a week which finally convinced the studio executives to hire him.

**********************************************************************

I did not write all that......
Will Dockery
2018-05-27 22:51:38 UTC
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Corey wrote in message news:1abce639-8cfe-4956-8927-***@googlegroups.com...

I was listening to Crimson and Clover
on the car radio the other day,
when someone asked who that was
covering the old Joan Jett song,
and suddenly I felt very, very old.

Then the news came on announcing
the sudden death of a local politician
of a massive heart attack. He was 60.

His funeral is this morning at the
Baltimore Hebrew Congregation.

------------------------------------------------------

Yes, I have had at least one friend pass away this year, almost twenty years
younger than me.
Will Dockery
2018-05-31 23:47:28 UTC
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Someone who's never posted
here before suddenly pops up
and says your poem made her
cry because it reminded her of
her husband who passed away?
Really? Is that what happened?
What happened is I'm posting links and promoting the poetry group...
Will Dockery
2018-06-03 21:12:26 UTC
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What do you get
Worthless trash from you lately, spambot.
Will Dockery
2018-06-05 05:30:29 UTC
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No matter what your opinion may be, the Hunchback was a part of the Universal Pictures Monsters "franchise" .

Getting back to this, to correct your error, Pendragon.
m***@gmail.com
2018-06-05 13:05:58 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
No matter what your opinion may be, the Hunchback was a part of the Universal Pictures Monsters "franchise" .
Getting back to this, to correct your error, Pendragon.
No, he wasn't.

There was no "Frankenstein vs The Hunchback," or "House of Quasimodo," or "Abbott & Costello Meet The Hunchback of Notre Dame."

Add "franchise" to the ever-growing list of words and phrases that Douchebag Dockery refuses to understand.
Will Dockery
2018-06-05 09:04:52 UTC
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Thanks for reading and commenting folks...
Will Dockery
2018-06-05 13:12:32 UTC
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Look up "Universal monsters" on Wikipedia .
m***@gmail.com
2018-06-05 13:17:38 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Look up "Universal monsters" on Wikipedia .
Look up "franchise" in any dictionary, dipshit.
Will Dockery
2018-06-05 14:25:46 UTC
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Post by m***@gmail.com
Post by Will Dockery
No matter what your opinion may be, the Hunchback was a part of the Universal Pictures Monsters "franchise" .
Getting back to this, to correct your error, Pendragon.
No, he wasn't.
Yes, he was:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universal_monsters

"The Universal monsters are fictional monsters that figured in various horror, suspense and science fiction films made by Universal Studios during the decades of the 1920s through the 1950s. They began with The Hunchback of Notre Dame and The Phantom of the Opera [...] Universal continued with... Dracula, Frankenstein, The Mummy, The Invisible Man, The Wolf Man and Creature from the Black Lagoon."
m***@gmail.com
2018-06-05 14:50:15 UTC
Reply
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Post by Will Dockery
Post by m***@gmail.com
Post by Will Dockery
No matter what your opinion may be, the Hunchback was a part of the Universal Pictures Monsters "franchise" .
Getting back to this, to correct your error, Pendragon.
No, he wasn't.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universal_monsters
"The Universal monsters are fictional monsters that figured in various horror, suspense and science fiction films made by Universal Studios during the decades of the 1920s through the 1950s. They began with The Hunchback of Notre Dame and The Phantom of the Opera [...] Universal continued with... Dracula, Frankenstein, The Mummy, The Invisible Man, The Wolf Man and Creature from the Black Lagoon."
How many times are you going to flaunt your ignorance before looking up "franchise"?
Will Dockery
2018-06-05 15:03:52 UTC
Reply
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Post by m***@gmail.com
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
No matter what your opinion may be, the Hunchback was a part of the Universal Pictures Monsters "franchise" .
Getting back to this, to correct your error, Pendragon.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universal_monsters
Post by m***@gmail.com
Post by Will Dockery
"The Universal monsters are fictional monsters that figured in various horror, suspense and science fiction films made by Universal Studios during the decades of the 1920s through the 1950s. They began with The Hunchback of Notre Dame and The Phantom of the Opera [...] Universal continued with... Dracula, Frankenstein, The Mummy, The Invisible Man, The Wolf Man and Creature from the Black Lagoon."
How many times
Look out, Pendragon's spambot rides again...

:)
Will Dockery™
2019-01-30 22:36:55 UTC
Reply
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Post by m***@gmail.com
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
No matter what your opinion may be, the Hunchback was a part of the Universal Pictures Monsters "franchise" .
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universal_monsters
"The Universal monsters are fictional monsters that figured in various horror, suspense and science fiction films made by Universal Studios during the decades of the 1920s through the 1950s. They began with The Hunchback of Notre Dame and The Phantom of the Opera [...] Universal continued with... Dracula, Frankenstein, The Mummy, The Invisible Man, The Wolf Man and Creature from the Black Lagoon."
How many times
Damn it man, where is Forest J. Ackerman when we need him?

:)
General Zod
2019-01-31 00:32:32 UTC
Reply
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Post by Will Dockery™
Post by m***@gmail.com
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
No matter what your opinion may be, the Hunchback was a part of the Universal Pictures Monsters "franchise" .
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universal_monsters
"The Universal monsters are fictional monsters that figured in various horror, suspense and science fiction films made by Universal Studios during the decades of the 1920s through the 1950s. They began with The Hunchback of Notre Dame and The Phantom of the Opera [...] Universal continued with... Dracula, Frankenstein, The Mummy, The Invisible Man, The Wolf Man and Creature from the Black Lagoon."
How many times
Damn it man, where is Forest J. Ackerman when we need him?
:)
I remember FJA now... he edited the Famous Monsters magazine in the 1970s.....
Will Dockery
2018-06-09 08:05:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
What do you get when you cross crimson and clover with crystal blue
persuasion?
I was someplace last night, not sure where, during my Friday night errand in
Atlanta, and "Hamky Panky" by Tommy Hames came o the muzak in a store I was
in...

Wouldn't that song be considered "rock-n-roll", Pen?
Michael Pendragon
2018-06-10 01:30:45 UTC
Reply
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Post by Will Dockery
What do you get when you cross crimson and clover with crystal blue
persuasion?
I was someplace last night, not sure where, during my Friday night errand in
Atlanta, and "Hamky Panky" by Tommy Hames came o the muzak in a store I was
in...
Wouldn't that song be considered "rock-n-roll", Pen?
No.
Will Dockery
2018-06-14 14:31:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
What do you get when you cross crimson and clover with crystal blue
persuasion?
I was someplace last night, not sure where, during my Friday night errand in
Atlanta, and "Hamky Panky" by Tommy Hames came o the muzak in a store I was
in...
Wouldn't that song be considered "rock-n-roll", Pen?
No.
How does it miss the mark?
Michael Pendragon
2018-06-14 14:45:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
What do you get when you cross crimson and clover with crystal blue
persuasion?
I was someplace last night, not sure where, during my Friday night errand in
Atlanta, and "Hamky Panky" by Tommy Hames came o the muzak in a store I was
in...
Wouldn't that song be considered "rock-n-roll", Pen?
No.
How does it miss the mark?
It has that post-Beatlean sound. Therefore it is "rock," not "rock 'n' roll."
Will Dockery
2018-06-14 16:39:15 UTC
Reply
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Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
What do you get when you cross crimson and clover with crystal blue persuasion?
I was someplace last night, not sure where, during my Friday night errand in Atlanta, and "Hamky Panky" by Tommy James came on the muzak in a store I was in...
Wouldn't that song be considered "rock-n-roll", Pen?
No.
How does it miss the mark?
It has that post-Beatlean sound. Therefore it is "rock," not "rock 'n' roll."
Yes, yes, The Beatles are truly the Great Divide...
Will Dockery
2018-06-16 13:02:27 UTC
Reply
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Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
What do you get when you cross crimson and clover with crystal blue
persuasion?
I was someplace last night, not sure where, during my Friday night errand in
Atlanta, and "Hamky Panky" by Tommy Hames came o the muzak in a store I was
in...
Wouldn't that song be considered "rock-n-roll", Pen?
No.
How does it miss the mark?
It has that post-Beatlean sound. Therefore it is "rock," not "rock 'n' roll."
Yes, I'm seeing "Hanky Panky" labelled "Garage Rock":

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hanky_Panky_(Tommy_James_and_the_Shondells_song)

"The music is equally simple and infectious, building itself on simple verse and chorus melodies that bounce up and down in a pleasant, bouncy fashion. James' version is pure garage rock, a live-in-the-studio effort that layered low-slung guitar riffs over a shuffling stomp of a beat from the rhythm section. James topped it off with amusingly mush-mouthed vocals a la "Louie Louie" and an out-of-control guitar solo that is cheered on by the other band members..."
Will Dockery
2018-08-26 16:45:24 UTC
Reply
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Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
What do you get when you cross crimson and clover with crystal blue
persuasion?
I was someplace last night, not sure where, during my Friday night errand in
Atlanta, and "Hamky Panky" by Tommy Hames came o the muzak in a store I was
in...
Wouldn't that song be considered "rock-n-roll", Pen?
No.
How does it miss the mark?
It has that post-Beatlean sound. Therefore it is "rock," not "rock 'n' roll."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hanky_Panky_(Tommy_James_and_the_Shondells_song)
"The music is equally simple and infectious, building itself on simple verse and chorus melodies that bounce up and down in a pleasant, bouncy fashion. James' version is pure garage rock, a live-in-the-studio effort that layered low-slung guitar riffs over a shuffling stomp of a beat from the rhythm section. James topped it off with amusingly mush-mouthed vocals a la "Louie Louie" and an out-of-control guitar solo that is cheered on by the other band members..."
More music ratings discussion with Pendragon.
George J. Dance
2018-08-26 17:46:31 UTC
Reply
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Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
What do you get when you cross crimson and clover with crystal blue
persuasion?
I was someplace last night, not sure where, during my Friday night errand in
Atlanta, and "Hamky Panky" by Tommy Hames came o the muzak in a store I was
in...
Wouldn't that song be considered "rock-n-roll", Pen?
No.
How does it miss the mark?
It has that post-Beatlean sound. Therefore it is "rock," not "rock 'n' roll."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hanky_Panky_(Tommy_James_and_the_Shondells_song)
"The music is equally simple and infectious, building itself on simple verse and chorus melodies that bounce up and down in a pleasant, bouncy fashion. James' version is pure garage rock, a live-in-the-studio effort that layered low-slung guitar riffs over a shuffling stomp of a beat from the rhythm section. James topped it off with amusingly mush-mouthed vocals a la "Louie Louie" and an out-of-control guitar solo that is cheered on by the other band members..."
That's probably because of the year. "Hanky Panky," though, was originally recorded and released in 1962; if it had been a hit then, it would definitely have been called rock 'n roll.

There was a mini-r'n'r revival in 1966, with songs like "Lightning Strikes" and "I Fought the Law" making the top 100. The British sound was starting to get passe (of course the Beatles were still big), and people were looking for something different.
Post by Will Dockery
More music ratings discussion with Pendragon.
Zod
2019-01-16 11:23:53 UTC
Reply
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Post by George J. Dance
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
What do you get when you cross crimson and clover with crystal blue
persuasion?
I was someplace last night, not sure where, during my Friday night errand in
Atlanta, and "Hamky Panky" by Tommy Hames came o the muzak in a store I was
in...
Wouldn't that song be considered "rock-n-roll", Pen?
No.
How does it miss the mark?
It has that post-Beatlean sound. Therefore it is "rock," not "rock 'n' roll."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hanky_Panky_(Tommy_James_and_the_Shondells_song)
"The music is equally simple and infectious, building itself on simple verse and chorus melodies that bounce up and down in a pleasant, bouncy fashion. James' version is pure garage rock, a live-in-the-studio effort that layered low-slung guitar riffs over a shuffling stomp of a beat from the rhythm section. James topped it off with amusingly mush-mouthed vocals a la "Louie Louie" and an out-of-control guitar solo that is cheered on by the other band members..."
That's probably because of the year. "Hanky Panky," though, was originally recorded and released in 1962; if it had been a hit then, it would definitely have been called rock 'n roll.
There was a mini-r'n'r revival in 1966, with songs like "Lightning Strikes" and "I Fought the Law" making the top 100. The British sound was starting to get passe (of course the Beatles were still big), and people were looking for something different.
Post by Will Dockery
More music ratings discussion with Pendragon.
Interesting history....
General Zod
2019-01-19 10:40:36 UTC
Reply
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Post by George J. Dance
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
What do you get when you cross crimson and clover with crystal blue
persuasion?
I was someplace last night, not sure where, during my Friday night errand in
Atlanta, and "Hamky Panky" by Tommy Hames came o the muzak in a store I was
in...
Wouldn't that song be considered "rock-n-roll", Pen?
No.
How does it miss the mark?
It has that post-Beatlean sound. Therefore it is "rock," not "rock 'n' roll."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hanky_Panky_(Tommy_James_and_the_Shondells_song)
"The music is equally simple and infectious, building itself on simple verse and chorus melodies that bounce up and down in a pleasant, bouncy fashion. James' version is pure garage rock, a live-in-the-studio effort that layered low-slung guitar riffs over a shuffling stomp of a beat from the rhythm section. James topped it off with amusingly mush-mouthed vocals a la "Louie Louie" and an out-of-control guitar solo that is cheered on by the other band members..."
That's probably because of the year. "Hanky Panky," though, was originally recorded and released in 1962; if it had been a hit then, it would definitely have been called rock 'n roll.
There was a mini-r'n'r revival in 1966, with songs like "Lightning Strikes" and "I Fought the Law" making the top 100. The British sound was starting to get passe (of course the Beatles were still big), and people were looking for something different.
Post by Will Dockery
More music ratings discussion with Pendragon.
In the golden years of rock-n-roll............
Zod
2019-01-24 04:53:33 UTC
Reply
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Post by George J. Dance
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
What do you get when you cross crimson and clover with crystal blue
persuasion?
I was someplace last night, not sure where, during my Friday night errand in
Atlanta, and "Hamky Panky" by Tommy Hames came o the muzak in a store I was
in...
Wouldn't that song be considered "rock-n-roll", Pen?
No.
How does it miss the mark?
It has that post-Beatlean sound. Therefore it is "rock," not "rock 'n' roll."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hanky_Panky_(Tommy_James_and_the_Shondells_song)
"The music is equally simple and infectious, building itself on simple verse and chorus melodies that bounce up and down in a pleasant, bouncy fashion. James' version is pure garage rock, a live-in-the-studio effort that layered low-slung guitar riffs over a shuffling stomp of a beat from the rhythm section. James topped it off with amusingly mush-mouthed vocals a la "Louie Louie" and an out-of-control guitar solo that is cheered on by the other band members..."
That's probably because of the year. "Hanky Panky," though, was originally recorded and released in 1962; if it had been a hit then, it would definitely have been called rock 'n roll.
There was a mini-r'n'r revival in 1966, with songs like "Lightning Strikes" and "I Fought the Law" making the top 100. The British sound was starting to get passe (of course the Beatles were still big), and people were looking for something different.
Post by Will Dockery
More music ratings discussion with Pendragon.
Interesting lore...........
Will Dockery
2018-06-09 09:48:58 UTC
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Color me incredulous.
"Kind of Blue." -Miles Davis
Will Dockery
2018-06-14 08:34:00 UTC
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Corey wrote in message news:1abce639-8cfe-4956-8927-***@googlegroups.com...

I was listening to Crimson and Clover
on the car radio the other day,
when someone asked who that was
covering the old Joan Jett song,
and suddenly I felt very, very old.

Then the news came on announcing
the sudden death of a local politician
of a massive heart attack. He was 60.

His funeral is this morning at the
Baltimore Hebrew Congregation.

-------------------------------------------------------------------

I hate it when that happens...
Will Dockery
2018-06-15 23:11:01 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
I was listening to Crimson and Clover
Look up the version by a singer from Atlanta named John Wesley Harding...
great talent.
General Zod
2018-06-30 06:00:19 UTC
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Deep Blue Sassafras
You never left
as another day passes.
Your love
my love
continues.
You sleep
or you wander,
depending on the chosen myth.
But those
deep blue flowers in a box
the color of your eyes.
The deep blue flowers
I found blooming
in the lumber yard.
I brought them to you
that summer morning in 1982.
The flowers
that smelled like sassafras.
Like you,
never leave my thoughts
day in, day out.
-Will Dockery
This one ranks high on yo9ur list, Doc......
Will Dockery
2018-07-07 21:18:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by General Zod
Deep Blue Sassafras
You never left
as another day passes.
Your love
my love
continues.
You sleep
or you wander,
depending on the chosen myth.
But those
deep blue flowers in a box
the color of your eyes.
The deep blue flowers
I found blooming
in the lumber yard.
I brought them to you
that summer morning in 1982.
The flowers
that smelled like sassafras.
Like you,
never leave my thoughts
day in, day out.
-Will Dockery
This one ranks high on yo9ur list, Doc......
Thanks again, Zod.

:)
ME
2018-07-07 21:35:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
You dumb ugly fuck!!
Can’t admit when you fuck up, which is quite often.
Deflect your way out of this one!
Will Dockery
2018-07-08 01:56:37 UTC
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Post by ME
You dumb
Writes the obsessed sleazebag troll ... slobber on, "Me".

:)
Will Dockery
2018-07-07 19:29:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
What do you get when you cross crimson and clover with crystal blue
persuasion?
Do Tommy James and The Shondells rate well in your Rock-N-Roll ratings,
Pendragon?
They had a couple of decent, if hippy-dippy songs.

Nor were they "Rock 'n' Roll" artists. That art form died when the Beatles
came on the scene (Stateside) in 1964. Since that time the only new artists
of any note to play "R'n'R" have been George Thorogood and The Stray Cats.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Again, just your opinion... and backed up with the slimmest of facts.
Will Dockery
2018-07-07 20:31:13 UTC
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That's the local library, "Me"... and I do have a card.

;)
ME
2018-07-07 20:35:04 UTC
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Permalink
Hey STUPID!
You posted this on the wrong fucking thread.
ME
2018-07-07 20:39:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Hey dumb ass!!
Please explain how you meant to do that!
ME
2018-07-07 20:45:10 UTC
Reply
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BUMP
ME
2018-07-07 20:50:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Hey bugly!!
I don’t want this one to get buried before you can explain it!
Will Dockery
2018-07-07 21:41:56 UTC
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Permalink
Writes the obsessed sleazebag troll...

Slobber on, "Me".

😀
ME
2018-07-07 21:46:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Slither on, you ugly fat fuck!
Will Dockery
2018-07-07 21:49:48 UTC
Reply
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By the way, thanks for soaring us a view of what a scumbag troll like you must look like, "Me".

😀
General Zod
2018-07-16 05:47:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Deep Blue Sassafras
You never left
as another day passes.
Your love
my love
continues.
You sleep
or you wander,
depending on the chosen myth.
But those
deep blue flowers in a box
the color of your eyes.
The deep blue flowers
I found blooming
in the lumber yard.
I brought them to you
that summer morning in 1982.
The flowers
that smelled like sassafras.
Like you,
never leave my thoughts
day in, day out.
-Will Dockery
Never get ti8red of this one...……………...
Will Dockery
2018-07-18 01:11:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by General Zod
Deep Blue Sassafras
You never left
as another day passes.
Your love
my love
continues.
You sleep
or you wander,
depending on the chosen myth.
But those
deep blue flowers in a box
the color of your eyes.
The deep blue flowers
I found blooming
in the lumber yard.
I brought them to you
that summer morning in 1982.
The flowers
that smelled like sassafras.
Like you,
never leave my thoughts
day in, day out.
-Will Dockery
Never get ti8red of this one...……………...
Thanks, Zod...

Keep hope alive, my friend.

😀
Will Dockery
2018-07-17 07:42:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Thanks, Zod...

Keep hope alive.

😀
Will Dockery
2018-07-19 10:57:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Corey wrote in message news:7e31ea0a-6dcf-444a-9cae-***@googlegroups.com...

Someone who's never posted
here before suddenly pops up
and says your poem made her
cry because it reminded her of
her husband who passed away?
Really? Is that what happened?

---------------------------------------------------

Sure, why not?

:)
Will Dockery
2018-07-21 20:29:46 UTC
Reply
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Post by Will Dockery
I was listening to Crimson and Clover
on the car radio the other day
Good song, really.
Brainiac 5
2018-07-23 05:22:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Deep Blue Sassafras
You never left
as another day passes.
Your love
my love
continues.
You sleep
or you wander,
depending on the chosen myth.
But those
deep blue flowers in a box
the color of your eyes.
The deep blue flowers
I found blooming
in the lumber yard.
I brought them to you
that summer morning in 1982.
The flowers
that smelled like sassafras.
Like you,
never leave my thoughts
day in, day out.
-Will Dockery
It has that feeling of a golden summerday in child hood......
Will Dockery
2018-07-24 10:09:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Brainiac 5
Deep Blue Sassafras
You never left
as another day passes.
Your love
my love
continues.
You sleep
or you wander,
depending on the chosen myth.
But those
deep blue flowers in a box
the color of your eyes.
The deep blue flowers
I found blooming
in the lumber yard.
I brought them to you
that summer morning in 1982.
The flowers
that smelled like sassafras.
Like you,
never leave my thoughts
day in, day out.
-Will Dockery
It has that feeling of a golden summerday in child hood......
It springs back to something Leonard Cohen used to sing that always rang true for me:

"We met when we were almost young
Deep in the green lilac park..." -Leonard Cohen

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aLOnQmmmlkw
Brainiac Five
2018-09-25 04:58:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Brainiac 5
Deep Blue Sassafras
You never left
as another day passes.
Your love
my love
continues.
You sleep
or you wander,
depending on the chosen myth.
But those
deep blue flowers in a box
the color of your eyes.
The deep blue flowers
I found blooming
in the lumber yard.
I brought them to you
that summer morning in 1982.
The flowers
that smelled like sassafras.
Like you,
never leave my thoughts
day in, day out.
-Will Dockery
It has that feeling of a golden summerday in child hood......
"We met when we were almost young
Deep in the green lilac park..." -Leonard Cohen
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aLOnQmmmlkw
It do live and breath immortall………………..
Will Dockery
2018-07-27 06:18:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Someone who's never posted here before
You mean the new Topix trolls?
Will Dockery
2018-07-27 07:52:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
the news came on announcing
the sudden death of a local politician
of a massive heart attack. He was 60.
Sorry to hear that he passed at such a young age...
Will Dockery
2018-07-27 22:07:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
suddenly I felt very, very old.
I wouldn't worry about it, it comes to all of us... if we're lucky.
Will Dockery
2018-08-26 18:00:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
It falls in my definition of Rock and Roll, as well.
Will Dockery
2018-08-27 21:05:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
The history of the recording of "Hanky Panky" is an interesting one... a pirate, bootleg edition of the single was the actual hit.
Frank Greenbaum
2018-08-31 05:10:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Deep Blue Sassafras
You never left
as another day passes.
Your love
my love
continues.
You sleep
or you wander,
depending on the chosen myth.
But those
deep blue flowers in a box
the color of your eyes.
The deep blue flowers
I found blooming
in the lumber yard.
I brought them to you
that summer morning in 1982.
The flowers
that smelled like sassafras.
Like you,
never leave my thoughts
day in, day out.
-Will Dockery
One day perhaps an illustrated volume...….
Will Dockery
2018-09-12 09:42:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Frank Greenbaum
Deep Blue Sassafras
You never left
as another day passes.
Your love
my love
continues.
You sleep
or you wander,
depending on the chosen myth.
But those
deep blue flowers in a box
the color of your eyes.
The deep blue flowers
I found blooming
in the lumber yard.
I brought them to you
that summer morning in 1982.
The flowers
that smelled like sassafras.
Like you,
never leave my thoughts
day in, day out.
-Will Dockery
One day perhaps an illustrated volume...….
That's definitely an interesting idea, brings to mind Cosmo Kramer's "coffee table book".
Will Dockery
2018-10-09 19:33:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
I was listening to Crimson and Clover
on the car radio the other day,
Not a bad song, really...
Brainiac Five
2018-10-09 23:49:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Deep Blue Sassafras
You never left
as another day passes.
Your love
my love
continues.
You sleep
or you wander,
depending on the chosen myth.
But those
deep blue flowers in a box
the color of your eyes.
The deep blue flowers
I found blooming
in the lumber yard.
I brought them to you
that summer morning in 1982.
The flowers
that smelled like sassafras.
Like you,
never leave my thoughts
day in, day out.
-Will Dockery
I making this in a blue comix story.............
Brainiac Five
2018-10-15 23:38:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Deep Blue Sassafras
You never left
as another day passes.
Your love
my love
continues.
You sleep
or you wander,
depending on the chosen myth.
But those
deep blue flowers in a box
the color of your eyes.
The deep blue flowers
I found blooming
in the lumber yard.
I brought them to you
that summer morning in 1982.
The flowers
that smelled like sassafras.
Like you,
never leave my thoughts
day in, day out.
-Will Dockery
To the point on target so direct......................
Will Dockery
2019-01-04 21:02:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Someone who's never posted
here before suddenly pops up
and says your poem made her
cry because it reminded her of
her husband who passed away?
Really? Is that what happened?
Yes, that really happened.
Me
2019-01-04 21:08:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Someone who's never posted
here before suddenly pops up
and says your poem made her
cry because it reminded her of
her husband who passed away?
Really? Is that what happened?
Yes, that really happened.
No it didn’t. That was a sock.
Will Dockery
2019-01-05 21:02:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Me
No it didn’t. That was
No, this is more of your delusional bullshit, "Me", where you suspect I'm everybody, then decide it is true.
Zod
2019-01-08 05:36:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Me
No it didn’t. That was
No, this is more of your delusional bullshit, "Me", where you suspect I'm everybody, then decide it is true.
Silly troll that ME person...………………………...
General Zod
2019-01-07 05:09:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Deep Blue Sassafras
You never left
as another day passes.
Your love
my love
continues.
You sleep
or you wander,
depending on the chosen myth.
But those
deep blue flowers in a box
the color of your eyes.
The deep blue flowers
I found blooming
in the lumber yard.
I brought them to you
that summer morning in 1982.
The flowers
that smelled like sassafras.
Like you,
never leave my thoughts
day in, day out.
-Will Dockery
Sweet and passionate love poem.
Thank you, Mariangela, glad you liked the poem.
There's a whole lot of people dropping by that don't even know the group exists.
I'm promoting the poetry group with links, so these people will find out about the group like the rest of us did, in their own way, their own time.
Right on...…………...
Will Dockery
2019-01-09 22:27:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Another day passes as if
you never left
our love continues,
you sleep, or you wander
depending upon
the chosen myth;
but those deep blue
flowers in a box,
those deep blue flowers wear
the color of your eyes,
those deep blue flowers that I found
blooming in the lumber yard,
I brought to you
that summer morning
in ‘82,
those flowers bloomed as fresh
that newly cut wood
and smelled as sweet as sassafras,
reminding why
you never leave
my thoughts
day in, day out.
-Will Dockery
Getting this thread back on track, with the actual poem.
Zod
2019-01-12 07:09:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Another day passes as if
you never left
our love continues,
you sleep, or you wander
depending upon
the chosen myth;
but those deep blue
flowers in a box,
those deep blue flowers wear
the color of your eyes,
those deep blue flowers that I found
blooming in the lumber yard,
I brought to you
that summer morning
in ‘82,
those flowers bloomed as fresh
that newly cut wood
and smelled as sweet as sassafras,
reminding why
you never leave
my thoughts
day in, day out.
-Will Dockery
Getting this thread back on track, with the actual poem.
Marvellous poetry,,,,,
Zod
2019-01-16 05:41:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Deep Blue Sassafras
You never left
as another day passes.
Your love
my love
continues.
You sleep
or you wander,
depending on the chosen myth.
But those
deep blue flowers in a box
the color of your eyes.
The deep blue flowers
I found blooming
in the lumber yard.
I brought them to you
that summer morning in 1982.
The flowers
that smelled like sassafras.
Like you,
never leave my thoughts
day in, day out.
-Will Dockery
Sweet and passionate love poem.
I second that.............
General Zod
2019-01-18 04:28:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Deep Blue Sassafras
You never left
as another day passes.
Your love
my love
continues.
You sleep
or you wander,
depending on the chosen myth.
But those
deep blue flowers in a box
the color of your eyes.
The deep blue flowers
I found blooming
in the lumber yard.
I brought them to you
that summer morning in 1982.
The flowers
that smelled like sassafras.
Like you,
never leave my thoughts
day in, day out.
-Will Dockery
Another read of a dynamite poem............
Will Dockery
2019-01-18 11:21:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Thanks again for the positive feedback, Zod.

😊
Michael Pendragon
2019-01-18 13:14:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Thanks again for the positive feedback, Zod, because it was an extra good slurp.
Will Dockery
2019-01-18 17:21:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Thanks again for the positive feedback, Zod
Yes, I wrote that.
--
Songs and poetry by Will Dockery:
https://www.reverbnation.com/willdockery
ME
2019-01-18 17:43:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Thanks again for the positive feedback, Zod, because it was an extra good slurp.
Michael, you know he saves those big, wet sloppy kisses for zod only after zod has posted at least 15 sperm swaps. (Thanks Nada!)
And only around the camp fire.
Zod
2019-01-18 22:35:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
New photos and videos here:

ttps://www.facebook.com/groups/629438503762910/
Will Dockery
2019-02-01 19:58:09 UTC
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Permalink
ttps://www.facebook.com/groups/629438503762910/

Thanks, Zod.
Will Dockery
2019-01-18 17:53:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Obsess much, "Me"?

😊
Will Dockery
2019-01-18 21:18:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
I was listening to Crimson and Clover
on the car radio the other day
Good tune.
Will Dockery
2019-01-19 01:38:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Why not? I can give you a bunch of reasons why it's an implausible
scenerio
But you would still be wrong...
General Zod
2019-01-30 06:03:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Why not? I can give you a bunch of reasons why it's an implausible
scenerio
But you would still be wrong...
Weirdness......…..
General Zod
2019-02-02 07:43:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Why not? I can give you a bunch of reasons why it's an implausible
scenerio
But you would still be wrong...
Whatv a silly young man....
Zod
2019-01-21 06:03:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Great! I loved it.
I second that..........
General Zod
2019-01-23 00:41:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Really like this one, Will.
Please forgive the edit...
another day passes
as if you never left
our love continues
you sleep or you wander
depending upon
the chosen myth
but those deep blue
flowers in a box
those deep blue flowers
the color of your eyes
those deep blue flowers
that I found blooming
in the lumber yard
and brought to you
that summer morning
in 1982
those flowers
that smelled like sassafras
like you they never
leave my thoughts
day in, day out
Outstanding.................
Will Dockery
2019-01-25 21:20:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by General Zod
Really like this one, Will.
Please forgive the edit...
another day passes
as if you never left
our love continues
you sleep or you wander
depending upon
the chosen myth
but those deep blue
flowers in a box
those deep blue flowers
the color of your eyes
those deep blue flowers
that I found blooming
in the lumber yard
and brought to you
that summer morning
in 1982
those flowers
that smelled like sassafras
like you they never
leave my thoughts
day in, day out
Outstanding.................
Good find, Zod, I had forgotten Robert's edit.
General Zod
2019-01-26 22:14:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by General Zod
Really like this one, Will.
Please forgive the edit...
another day passes
as if you never left
our love continues
you sleep or you wander
depending upon
the chosen myth
but those deep blue
flowers in a box
those deep blue flowers
the color of your eyes
those deep blue flowers
that I found blooming
in the lumber yard
and brought to you
that summer morning
in 1982
those flowers
that smelled like sassafras
like you they never
leave my thoughts
day in, day out
Outstanding.................
Good find, Zod, I had forgotten Robert's edit.
It gives interesting perspectives..............
Zod
2019-01-29 02:45:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by General Zod
Really like this one, Will.
Please forgive the edit...
another day passes
as if you never left
our love continues
you sleep or you wander
depending upon
the chosen myth
but those deep blue
flowers in a box
those deep blue flowers
the color of your eyes
those deep blue flowers
that I found blooming
in the lumber yard
and brought to you
that summer morning
in 1982
those flowers
that smelled like sassafras
like you they never
leave my thoughts
day in, day out
Outstanding.................
Good find, Zod, I had forgotten Robert's edit.
Yes it was worth a read....
Will Dockery
2019-01-28 04:05:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Worth a look, anyhow.
Will Dockery™
2019-01-31 22:55:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Hunchback and the Phantom were always included, at least in the F.J.A. take on the Famous Monsters of Filmland.
ME
2019-01-31 23:20:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery™
Hunchback and the Phantom were always included, at least in the F.J.A. take on the Famous Monsters of Filmland.
Isn’t that the guy pickles robbed?
Will Dockery™
2019-01-31 23:31:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by ME
Post by Will Dockery™
Hunchback and the Phantom were always included, at least in the F.J.A. take on the Famous Monsters of Filmland.
Isn’t that the guy
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forrest_J_Ackerman

"Forrest James Ackerman[1] (November 24, 1916 – December 4, 2008) was an American magazine editor, science fiction writer and literary agent, a founder of science fiction fandom, a leading expert on science fiction, horror, and fantasy films,[2] and acknowledged as the world's most avid collector of genre books and movie memorabilia.[3] He was based in Los Angeles, California.

During his career as a literary agent, Ackerman represented such science fiction authors as Ray Bradbury, Isaac Asimov, A.E. Van Vogt, Curt Siodmak, and L. Ron Hubbard.[4] For more than seven decades, he was one of science fiction's staunchest spokesmen and promoters.

Ackerman was the editor and principal writer of the American magazine Famous Monsters of Filmland..."
ME
2019-01-31 23:35:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery™
Post by ME
Post by Will Dockery™
Hunchback and the Phantom were always included, at least in the F.J.A. take on the Famous Monsters of Filmland.
Isn’t that the guy
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forrest_J_Ackerman
"Forrest James Ackerman[1] (November 24, 1916 – December 4, 2008) was an American magazine editor, science fiction writer and literary agent, a founder of science fiction fandom, a leading expert on science fiction, horror, and fantasy films,[2] and acknowledged as the world's most avid collector of genre books and movie memorabilia.[3] He was based in Los Angeles, California.
During his career as a literary agent, Ackerman represented such science fiction authors as Ray Bradbury, Isaac Asimov, A.E. Van Vogt, Curt Siodmak, and L. Ron Hubbard.[4] For more than seven decades, he was one of science fiction's staunchest spokesmen and promoters.
Ackerman was the editor and principal writer of the American magazine Famous Monsters of Filmland..."
He’s the one you said might have faked or forged letters from pickles.
He sounds kinda unhinged from what you’ve said.
Will Dockery™
2019-02-01 00:09:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
FJA was always cool with me, I knew him when he edited the Perry Rhodan sci fi series.
ME
2019-02-01 00:47:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery™
FJA was always cool with me, I knew him when he edited the Perry Rhodan sci fi series.
So you’ve met him.
ME
2019-02-01 22:27:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery™
FJA was always cool with me, I knew him when he edited the Perry Rhodan sci fi series.
So you knew Forrest James Ackerman, will?
ME
2019-02-12 11:43:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery™
FJA was always cool with me, I knew him when he edited the Perry Rhodan sci fi series.
Did he take his coffee black also?
General Zod
2019-02-02 19:24:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by ME
Post by Will Dockery™
Post by ME
Post by Will Dockery™
Hunchback and the Phantom were always included, at least in the F.J.A. take on the Famous Monsters of Filmland.
Isn’t that the guy
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forrest_J_Ackerman
"Forrest James Ackerman[1] (November 24, 1916 – December 4, 2008) was an American magazine editor, science fiction writer and literary agent, a founder of science fiction fandom, a leading expert on science fiction, horror, and fantasy films,[2] and acknowledged as the world's most avid collector of genre books and movie memorabilia.[3] He was based in Los Angeles, California.
During his career as a literary agent, Ackerman represented such science fiction authors as Ray Bradbury, Isaac Asimov, A.E. Van Vogt, Curt Siodmak, and L. Ron Hubbard.[4] For more than seven decades, he was one of science fiction's staunchest spokesmen and promoters.
Ackerman was the editor and principal writer of the American magazine Famous Monsters of Filmland..."
He’s the one you said might have faked or forged letters from pickles.
He sounds kinda unhinged from what you’ve said.
He was the expert on famous monsters ... eh heh....
Zod
2019-02-03 22:46:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery™
Post by ME
Post by Will Dockery™
Hunchback and the Phantom were always included, at least in the F.J.A. take on the Famous Monsters of Filmland.
Isn’t that the guy
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forrest_J_Ackerman
"Forrest James Ackerman[1] (November 24, 1916 – December 4, 2008) was an American magazine editor, science fiction writer and literary agent, a founder of science fiction fandom, a leading expert on science fiction, horror, and fantasy films,[2] and acknowledged as the world's most avid collector of genre books and movie memorabilia.[3] He was based in Los Angeles, California.
During his career as a literary agent, Ackerman represented such science fiction authors as Ray Bradbury, Isaac Asimov, A.E. Van Vogt, Curt Siodmak, and L. Ron Hubbard.[4] For more than seven decades, he was one of science fiction's staunchest spokesmen and promoters.
Ackerman was the editor and principal writer of the American magazine Famous Monsters of Filmland..."
Interesting fellow.....
Michael Pendragon
2019-02-01 05:00:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery™
Hunchback and the Phantom were always included, at least in the F.J.A. take on the Famous Monsters of Filmland.
They are "famous monsters," Will. They are *not* part of the Universal Monster franchise. There was no "House of Quasimodo," or "Dracula Meets the Phantom," or "Son of Quasimodo," or "Abbott and Costello Meet the Phantom."

They were one-shot deals. They also predated the "franchise" which began in 1931.
Will Dockery™
2019-02-01 05:35:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Okay, Pendragon, remember you already convinced me a while back.

:)
General Zod
2019-02-01 22:36:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery™
Hunchback and the Phantom were always included, at least in the F.J.A. take on the Famous Monsters of Filmland.
They are "famous monsters," Will. They are *not* part of the Universal Monster franchise. There was no "House of Quasimodo," or "Dracula Meets the Phantom," or "Son of Quasimodo," or "Abbott and Costello Meet the Phantom."
They were one-shot deals. They also predated the "franchise" which began in 1931.
Makes sense....
ME
2019-02-01 22:38:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by General Zod
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery™
Hunchback and the Phantom were always included, at least in the F.J.A. take on the Famous Monsters of Filmland.
They are "famous monsters," Will. They are *not* part of the Universal Monster franchise. There was no "House of Quasimodo," or "Dracula Meets the Phantom," or "Son of Quasimodo," or "Abbott and Costello Meet the Phantom."
They were one-shot deals. They also predated the "franchise" which began in 1931.
Makes sense....
Glad you agree with Micheal, zod.
Will Dockery™
2019-02-01 22:53:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I was a reader of FJA's Perry Rhodan series, and a letters page regular.
ME
2019-02-01 23:50:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery™
I was a reader of FJA's Perry Rhodan series, and a letters page regular.
That’s not what I asked, will.
Zod
2019-02-12 11:38:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery™
I was a reader of FJA's Perry Rhodan series, and a letters page regular.
That was a good paperback series I read two or three of them.........
Zod
2019-02-13 00:48:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Zod
Post by Will Dockery™
I was a reader of FJA's Perry Rhodan series, and a letters page regular.
That was a good paperback series I read two or three of them.........
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perry_Rhodan
Will Dockery™
2019-02-13 06:17:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Perry Rhodan could be considered a German version of Star Trek.
Chafetz Chayim ha'Yehu'di
2019-02-13 06:19:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery™
Perry Rhodan could be considered a German version of Star Trek.
Yes, it can be...Perry Rhodan was quite enjoyable.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

STEPHAN PICKERING / חפץ ח"ם בן אברהם
Torah אלילה Yehu'di Apikores / Philologia Kabbalistica Speculativa Researcher
לחיות זמן רב ולשגשג...לעולם לא עוד
THE KABBALAH FRACTALS PROJECT
לעולם לא אשכח

IN PROGRESS: Shabtai Zisel ben Avraham v'Rachel Riva:
davening in the mus
Will Dockery™
2019-02-13 17:13:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Chafetz Chayim ha'Yehu'di
Post by Will Dockery™
Perry Rhodan could be considered a German version of Star Trek.
Yes, it can be...Perry Rhodan was quite enjoyable.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
STEPHAN PICKERING / חפץ ח"ם בן אברהם
Torah אלילה Yehu'di Apikores / Philologia Kabbalistica Speculativa Researcher
לחיות זמן רב ולשגשג...לעולם לא עוד
THE KABBALAH FRACTALS PROJECT
לעולם לא אשכח
davening in the musematic dark
Yes, the series built momentum.Unfortunately, it never caught on so well here in America.

I no longer have copies of these hundred or so paperbacks, but remember one of my letters to F.J.A. appeared in #32:

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/646980.Challenge_of_the_Unknown

Challenge of the Unknown
(Perry Rhodan - English #32)
by Clark Darlton

"In #32 of these Ace translations of Perry Rhodan, you'll see an excerpt from a letter I wrote to the Ackermans, back when I was still known as "William Dockery", mostly saying that after a certain issue I was "Hooked for life!", and with various long gaps apparently I am, as I still get really interested at times in the hopeless task of getting the entire epic story. I had another couple of blurbs from my letters published in later issues, before becoming... unhooked... for a while. Becoming a teenager in the early 1970s was, after all kind of a full-time task and some things had to be put aside. Anyway, thanks for bringing back some very vivid memories of some really interesting characters and concepts. A shame it could not have continued, it was some sound science fiction with a retro flavor that was enjoyable..." -Will Dockery
Will Dockery™
2019-02-02 01:51:51 UTC
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Permalink
Well, that was my answer, "Me".

😊
ME
2019-02-02 02:57:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery™
Well, that was my answer, "Me".
😊
You lied then, will
Wow. That’s a real shocker!
Not worth another of your lying rants that goes on for days.
Just another will dockery lie to go with all the others lies by you that no one really cares about.
Never mind.
Will Dockery™
2019-02-08 02:27:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery™
Well, that was my answer, "Me".
😊
You
<confusion snipped>

You must be confused again, "Me"
Zod
2019-02-09 03:48:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery™
Post by Will Dockery™
Well, that was my answer, "Me".
😊
You
<confusion snipped>
You must be confused again, "Me"
As it always is.....
Will Dockery
2019-02-05 23:00:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
What do you get when you cross crimson and clover with crystal blue
persuasion?
Nice shot, Pen.
Zod
2019-02-07 06:34:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
What do you get when you cross crimson and clover with crystal blue
persuasion?
Nice shot, Pen.
Good comment for a change....
Will Dockery™
2019-02-09 05:47:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Thanks for the feedback, Zod.

:)
Zod
2019-02-09 22:48:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Deep Blue Sassafras
You never left
as another day passes.
Your love
my love
continues.
You sleep
or you wander,
depending on the chosen myth.
But those
deep blue flowers in a box
the color of your eyes.
The deep blue flowers
I found blooming
in the lumber yard.
I brought them to you
that summer morning in 1982.
The flowers
that smelled like sassafras.
Like you,
never leave my thoughts
day in, day out.
-Will Dockery
Short sweet to the point..well written
I second that...................
Will Dockery™
2019-02-11 00:30:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I appreciate that, General Zod.

😊
Zod
2019-02-12 00:45:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Deep Blue Sassafras
You never left
as another day passes.
Your love
my love
continues.
You sleep
or you wander,
depending on the chosen myth.
But those
deep blue flowers in a box
the color of your eyes.
The deep blue flowers
I found blooming
in the lumber yard.
I brought them to you
that summer morning in 1982.
The flowers
that smelled like sassafras.
Like you,
never leave my thoughts
day in, day out.
-Will Dockery
Like a fine wine this poem is better as it gets older..............
General Zod
2019-02-12 03:00:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
A poem that rolled....

Like it was meant to be.
..
Will Dockery™
2019-02-12 04:44:46 UTC
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Permalink
Appreciate the read and endorsement, General Zod.
Will Dockery™
2019-02-12 11:53:03 UTC
Reply
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Forest J Ackerman probably drank iced tea for all I know.

😊
ME
2019-02-12 11:54:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery™
Forest J Ackerman probably drank iced tea for all I know.
😊
But you claimed you knew him, remember?
I bet pickles knows
Will Dockery™
2019-02-12 11:58:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
You got a bit confused, "Me", I did correspond with FJA, and he published my letters in his Perry Rhodan books, but I never had coffee with him.

😊
ME
2019-02-12 12:14:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery™
You got a bit confused, "Me", I did correspond with FJA, and he published my letters in his Perry Rhodan books, but I never had coffee with him.
😊
When did you correspond with him?
h***@gmail.com
2019-02-12 12:16:36 UTC
Reply
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Tick
Tock
Tick
Tock
Tick
Tock
Tick
Tock
Tick
Tock
Tick
Tick
Tick
Tick
Tick
Me
2019-02-12 12:19:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Tick
Tock
Tick
Tock
Tick
Tock
Tick
Tock
Tick
Tock
Tick
Tick
Tick
Tick
Tick
KABOOM!!!!!
Will Dockery™
2019-02-12 12:17:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
When he was putting together the Perry Rhodan series, look that up.
NancyGene
2019-02-12 12:45:19 UTC
Reply
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Post by Will Dockery™
When he was putting together the Perry Rhodan series, look that up.
Then the Syracuse Library has copies of your letters to him? Unless someone forged letters from you to FJA.
Will Dockery™
2019-02-12 12:48:20 UTC
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FJA published my letters in the back of several Perry Rhodan paperbacks.
ME
2019-02-12 13:39:35 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery™
FJA published my letters in the back of several Perry Rhodan paperbacks.
Do you have the titles?
General Zod
2019-02-12 14:01:37 UTC
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The name of the series was Perry Rhodan....

I read a few episodes.....
General Zod
2019-02-12 12:52:21 UTC
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Perry Rhodan was a German science fiction series that was translated to English
Will Dockery™
2019-02-12 21:09:46 UTC
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I've written about my youth many times, I was an avid science fiction fan (still am, really) and Perry Rhodan was a favorite for a while.
Will Dockery™
2019-02-14 01:43:47 UTC
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Lest it becomes buried, some of the requested information on Perry Rhodan.
General Zod
2019-02-15 03:32:05 UTC
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Outstanding....

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