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To Helen --- Edgar Allan Poe
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Victor Hugo III
2019-06-17 23:37:25 UTC
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Helen, thy beauty is to me
Like those Nicean barks of yore,
That gently, o'er a perfumed sea,
The weary, wayworn wanderer bore
To his own native shore.
On desperate seas long wont to roam,
Thy hyacinth hair, thy classic face,
Thy Naiad airs have brought me home
To the glory that was Greece
And the grandeur that was Rome.

Lo! in yon brilliant window-niche
How statue-like I see thee stand,
The agate lamp within thy hand!
Ah, Psyche, from the regions which
Are Holy Land!

Tom Hanks reciting a poem (Edgar Allan Poe - to Helen)
Michael Pendragon
2019-06-18 02:46:07 UTC
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Post by Victor Hugo III
http://youtu.be/y3jdZ1NUjWg
Helen, thy beauty is to me
Like those Nicean barks of yore,
That gently, o'er a perfumed sea,
The weary, wayworn wanderer bore
To his own native shore.
On desperate seas long wont to roam,
Thy hyacinth hair, thy classic face,
Thy Naiad airs have brought me home
To the glory that was Greece
And the grandeur that was Rome.
Lo! in yon brilliant window-niche
How statue-like I see thee stand,
The agate lamp within thy hand!
Ah, Psyche, from the regions which
Are Holy Land!
Tom Hanks reciting a poem (Edgar Allan Poe - to Helen)
And what does the poem mean to you, Lady Bunny?

Michael Pendragon
"Memories... pressed between the pages just like fine wine...…........"
-- George "Lady Bunny" Sulzbach
Victor Hugo III
2019-06-18 03:26:44 UTC
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On Monday, June 17, 2019 at 10:46:08 PM UTC-4, Pendragon The Liar lied again....
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Victor Hugo III
http://youtu.be/y3jdZ1NUjWg
Helen, thy beauty is to me
Like those Nicean barks of yore,
That gently, o'er a perfumed sea,
The weary, wayworn wanderer bore
To his own native shore.
On desperate seas long wont to roam,
Thy hyacinth hair, thy classic face,
Thy Naiad airs have brought me home
To the glory that was Greece
And the grandeur that was Rome.
Lo! in yon brilliant window-niche
How statue-like I see thee stand,
The agate lamp within thy hand!
Ah, Psyche, from the regions which
Are Holy Land!
Tom Hanks reciting a poem (Edgar Allan Poe - to Helen)
And what does the poem mean to you
What does the poem mean to you, Pendragon The Liar?

??
Will Dockery
2019-06-18 02:52:52 UTC
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Good find, Vic.

😉
Michael Pendragon
2019-06-18 03:13:16 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Good find, Vic.
And what does the poem mean to you, Whiny Willie?


Michael Pendragon
“[T]here is a world of difference between talking or writing about something and actually doing it, whether it's having sex with kids or dousing people with gasoline and setting them on fire.”
-- George Dunce
Will Dockery
2019-06-18 03:16:39 UTC
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A poem about Helen of Troy, Poe style.

:)
Michael Pendragon
2019-06-18 03:25:39 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
A poem about Helen of Troy, Poe style.
I didn't ask you who "Helen" was (and, btw, you're only half correct). I asked you what you think the poem *means.* What about Helen of Troy? How could Helen's face bring him back to Ancient Greece when Helen died several centuries before Classical Antiquity? If this were a poetry class, you'd receive a failing grade for your "answer."

Care to try again?


Michael Pendragon
“There is no 'fact' of 'statutory rape'. 'Morality' -- like 'gnosticism', 'god', haKodesh Barukh hu, 'mysticism' -- are NOT definable, and for you to keep transposing your stultifying proto-fascism onto others is not accepted by me.”
-- Stephen “Lady Pickles” Pickering
Victor Hugo III
2019-06-18 03:31:58 UTC
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Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
A poem about Helen of Troy, Poe style.
I didn't ask you who "Helen" was
The poem is about Helen you nitpicky fruitcake fool.............
Michelangelo Scarlotti
2019-06-18 03:49:20 UTC
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Post by Victor Hugo III
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
A poem about Helen of Troy, Poe style.
I didn't ask you who "Helen" was
The poem is about Helen you nitpicky fruitcake fool.............
But who is "Helen," and what is the poem saying about her?


Michael Pendragon
"A favorite movie.... I read it like a comic book....."
-- George "Lady Bunny" Sulzbach
Victor Hugo III
2019-06-18 03:52:21 UTC
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http://youtu.be/y3jdZ1NUjWg
Post by Victor Hugo III
Helen, thy beauty is to me
Like those Nicean barks of yore,
That gently, o'er a perfumed sea,
The weary, wayworn wanderer bore
To his own native shore.
On desperate seas long wont to roam,
Thy hyacinth hair, thy classic face,
Thy Naiad airs have brought me home
To the glory that was Greece
And the grandeur that was Rome.
Lo! in yon brilliant window-niche
How statue-like I see thee stand,
The agate lamp within thy hand!
Ah, Psyche, from the regions which
Are Holy Land!
Tom Hanks reciting a poem (Edgar Allan Poe - to Helen)
Obviously a poem to Helen of Troy.....

A no brainer there..........
Michelangelo Scarlotti
2019-06-18 04:07:10 UTC
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Post by Victor Hugo III
http://youtu.be/y3jdZ1NUjWg
Post by Victor Hugo III
Helen, thy beauty is to me
Like those Nicean barks of yore,
That gently, o'er a perfumed sea,
The weary, wayworn wanderer bore
To his own native shore.
On desperate seas long wont to roam,
Thy hyacinth hair, thy classic face,
Thy Naiad airs have brought me home
To the glory that was Greece
And the grandeur that was Rome.
Lo! in yon brilliant window-niche
How statue-like I see thee stand,
The agate lamp within thy hand!
Ah, Psyche, from the regions which
Are Holy Land!
Tom Hanks reciting a poem (Edgar Allan Poe - to Helen)
Obviously a poem to Helen of Troy.....
A no brainer there..........
Guess who hasn't got a brain.

It's a poem *to* Jane Stannard.

Poe is comparing her to Helen of Troy.

Care to try again?


Michael Pendragon
“It is my retirement....... Nothing more or less................ “
-- George “Lady Bunny” Suzbach, aging career panhandler
Will Dockery
2019-06-18 04:16:56 UTC
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That informaation is not in the poem, Pendragon.

:)
Michael Pendragon
2019-06-18 12:33:26 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
That informaation is not in the poem, Pendragon.
The poem is often titled "To Helen (Stannard)," but that's beside the point. A critical reading of the poem makes it abundantly clear that he cannot be addressing Helen of Troy:

Helen, thy beauty is to me
Like those Nicéan barks of yore,

"Of yore" means "of long ago." Since the fall of Troy predates recorded history, there isn't much history of a contemporary of Helen's to be drawing on; so it's a safe assumption that the speaker is addressing a modern woman as "Helen."

Similarly, the lines:

That gently, o'er a perfumed sea,
The weary, way-worn wanderer bore
To his own native shore

allude to both the travels of Odysseus (post-Trojan War) and the 10th Century (or earlier) OE poem, "The Wanderer" (which was, obviously, written long after Helen's time).

Further, in the poem's most celebrated lines,

Thy Naiad airs have brought me home
To the glory that was Greece,
And the grandeur that was Rome.

the speaker refers to both Classical Greece (500+ years after the Trojan War) and Rome (which, according to Virgil, was founded after the Trojan War) in the past-tense. His use of past tense means that the speaker must be from some period after the fall of Rome (approx. 1,600 years after the Trojan War), since no historical context is given regarding the speaker, we can assume that he is speaking from the date of the poem's composition (first published in 1831, but believed to have been written eight or more years earlier).

So, while you wouldn't be expected to know that the poem was addressed to Mrs. Jane Stith Craig Stanard (Jane "Helen" Stannard [Poe's spelling]), any educated reader should be able to draw the immediate conclusion that the poem is set in the (then) present day, and that a modern woman is being addressed as "Helen" as a means of comparing her beauty to that of the legendary queen.

Now, I've given you quite a good deal of information with which you can *begin* to explain what you think the poem means. I suggest you first acquaint yourself with "The Wanderer," as an understanding of it is crucial to any interpretation of Poe's work.

Care to take another stab at it?


Michael Pendragon
“Allen Ginsberg had sexual activity with a young man who was NOT 15, but 17/18, and he made a hyperbolic error in using the word '15'.”
-- Stephen “Lady Pickles” Pickering
Will Dockery
2019-06-18 17:08:50 UTC
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Post by Victor Hugo III
Post by Will Dockery
That informaation is not in the poem, Pendragon.
Helen, thy beauty is to me
Like those Nicéan barks of yore,
"Of yore" means "of long ago." Since the fall of Troy predates recorded history, there isn't much history of a contemporary of Helen's to be drawing on; so it's a safe assumption that the speaker is addressing a modern woman as "Helen."
That gently, o'er a perfumed sea,
The weary, way-worn wanderer bore
To his own native shore
allude to both the travels of Odysseus (post-Trojan War) and the 10th Century (or earlier) OE poem, "The Wanderer" (which was, obviously, written long after Helen's time).
Further, in the poem's most celebrated lines,
Thy Naiad airs have brought me home
To the glory that was Greece,
And the grandeur that was Rome.
the speaker refers to both Classical Greece (500+ years after the Trojan War) and Rome (which, according to Virgil, was founded after the Trojan War) in the past-tense. His use of past tense means that the speaker must be from some period after the fall of Rome (approx. 1,600 years after the Trojan War), since no historical context is given regarding the speaker, we can assume that he is speaking from the date of the poem's composition (first published in 1831, but believed to have been written eight or more years earlier).
So, while you wouldn't be expected to know that the poem was addressed to Mrs. Jane Stith Craig Stanard (Jane "Helen" Stannard [Poe's spelling]), any educated reader should be able to draw the immediate conclusion that the poem is set in the (then) present day, and that a modern woman is being addressed as "Helen" as a means of comparing her beauty to that of the legendary queen.
Now, I've given you quite a good deal of information with which you can *begin* to explain what you think the poem means. I suggest you first acquaint yourself with "The Wanderer," as an understanding of it is crucial to any interpretation of Poe's work.
Thanks for all this background information, I'll read it with all these details i mind next time I read the poem.
Michael Pendragon
2019-06-18 17:13:56 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Post by Victor Hugo III
Post by Will Dockery
That informaation is not in the poem, Pendragon.
Helen, thy beauty is to me
Like those Nicéan barks of yore,
"Of yore" means "of long ago." Since the fall of Troy predates recorded history, there isn't much history of a contemporary of Helen's to be drawing on; so it's a safe assumption that the speaker is addressing a modern woman as "Helen."
That gently, o'er a perfumed sea,
The weary, way-worn wanderer bore
To his own native shore
allude to both the travels of Odysseus (post-Trojan War) and the 10th Century (or earlier) OE poem, "The Wanderer" (which was, obviously, written long after Helen's time).
Further, in the poem's most celebrated lines,
Thy Naiad airs have brought me home
To the glory that was Greece,
And the grandeur that was Rome.
the speaker refers to both Classical Greece (500+ years after the Trojan War) and Rome (which, according to Virgil, was founded after the Trojan War) in the past-tense. His use of past tense means that the speaker must be from some period after the fall of Rome (approx. 1,600 years after the Trojan War), since no historical context is given regarding the speaker, we can assume that he is speaking from the date of the poem's composition (first published in 1831, but believed to have been written eight or more years earlier).
So, while you wouldn't be expected to know that the poem was addressed to Mrs. Jane Stith Craig Stanard (Jane "Helen" Stannard [Poe's spelling]), any educated reader should be able to draw the immediate conclusion that the poem is set in the (then) present day, and that a modern woman is being addressed as "Helen" as a means of comparing her beauty to that of the legendary queen.
Now, I've given you quite a good deal of information with which you can *begin* to explain what you think the poem means. I suggest you first acquaint yourself with "The Wanderer," as an understanding of it is crucial to any interpretation of Poe's work.
Thanks for all this background information, I'll read it with all these details i mind next time I read the poem.
Which will be when Hell freezes over, or you write that long-promised Bukowski criticism... whichever comes first.


Michael Pendragon
“I'd think so, but never underestimate the stupidity of a troll.”
-- Wee Whiny Willie Dockery
Will Dockery
2019-06-18 17:18:59 UTC
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Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Thanks for all this background information, I'll read it with all these details i mind next time I read the poem.
Which will be when
When I decide to read it again, I'll let you know.

:)
Michael Pendragon
2019-06-18 17:24:13 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Thanks for all this background information, I'll read it with all these details i mind next time I read the poem.
Which will be when
When I decide to read it again, I'll let you know.
Like I said.

Michael Pendragon
“Kids will play around with other kids, having been one, I know that, but consent laws are indeed in place to keep adult predators from legally seducing children.”
-- Wee Whiny Willie Dockery
Will Dockery
2019-06-18 17:30:59 UTC
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Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Thanks for all this background information, I'll read it with all these details i mind next time I read the poem.
Which will be when
When I decide to read it again, I'll let you know.
Like I said
You are entitled to your own opinion, of course.

😉
Victor Hugo III
2019-06-18 23:37:59 UTC
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Post by Victor Hugo III
http://youtu.be/y3jdZ1NUjWg
Helen, thy beauty is to me
Like those Nicean barks of yore,
That gently, o'er a perfumed sea,
The weary, wayworn wanderer bore
To his own native shore.
On desperate seas long wont to roam,
Thy hyacinth hair, thy classic face,
Thy Naiad airs have brought me home
To the glory that was Greece
And the grandeur that was Rome.
Lo! in yon brilliant window-niche
How statue-like I see thee stand,
The agate lamp within thy hand!
Ah, Psyche, from the regions which
Are Holy Land!
Tom Hanks reciting a poem (Edgar Allan Poe - to Helen)
I just enjoy it as a poem....

I don't care about the back story..................
Michael Pendragon
2019-06-19 01:13:27 UTC
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Post by Victor Hugo III
Post by Victor Hugo III
http://youtu.be/y3jdZ1NUjWg
Helen, thy beauty is to me
Like those Nicean barks of yore,
That gently, o'er a perfumed sea,
The weary, wayworn wanderer bore
To his own native shore.
On desperate seas long wont to roam,
Thy hyacinth hair, thy classic face,
Thy Naiad airs have brought me home
To the glory that was Greece
And the grandeur that was Rome.
Lo! in yon brilliant window-niche
How statue-like I see thee stand,
The agate lamp within thy hand!
Ah, Psyche, from the regions which
Are Holy Land!
Tom Hanks reciting a poem (Edgar Allan Poe - to Helen)
I just enjoy it as a poem....
I don't care about the back story..................
Which is why I asked you what message you get from the poem.

If "Helen of Troy" is the subject of the poem, what does the poem say about "Helen"?
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