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Selected Poems 1976-2019 by Will Dockery (on Goodreads)
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Will Dockery
2019-12-01 21:50:26 UTC
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Selected Poems 1976-2019 by Will Dockery

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019

"Will Dockery was born in La Grange, Georgia, in 1958. Inspired by the poetry of Poe and Rimbaud and the music of the Beatles and Bob Dylan, he began writing poetry and song lyrics in junior high, and has been producing poetry chapbooks and recording his songs since the 1980s. He is a well known performance poet, and a past recipient of Playgrounds magazine's Perky Award for poetry. He later wrote a column for Playgrounds for over a decade. He lives in Columbus, Georgia. This book brings together poetry and song lyrics from all five decades of Dockery's career so far, to give an intimate look at the man and his work." -George J Dance (Editor)
NancyGene
2019-12-01 22:12:11 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
According to the majority of comments on Goodreads, it is tacky and cheesy for an author to rate his own book.
Will Dockery
2019-12-01 22:28:15 UTC
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Post by NancyGene
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
According to the majority of comments on Goodreads
Here's my book on Library Thing:

https://www.librarything.com/work/23910384
Z***@none.i2p
2019-12-02 13:16:57 UTC
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Will Dockery wrote on Sun, 01 December 2019 22:28
Post by Will Dockery
Post by NancyGene
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
According to the majority of comments on Goodreads
https://www.librarything.com/work/23910384
Quite cool.........!!
George J. Dance
2019-12-01 22:46:52 UTC
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Post by NancyGene
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
According to the majority of comments on Goodreads, it is tacky and cheesy for an author to rate his own book.
You constantly make vague claims like that, which you never back up. I'd like to see the statistics you're using for that claim. Please tell us how many comments there are on Goodreads, how many of those even mention authors rating their own books, and your source for both numbers.
NancyGene
2019-12-02 00:35:01 UTC
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Post by George J. Dance
Post by NancyGene
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
According to the majority of comments on Goodreads, it is tacky and cheesy for an author to rate his own book.
You constantly make vague claims like that, which you never back up. I'd like to see the statistics you're using for that claim. Please tell us how many comments there are on Goodreads, how many of those even mention authors rating their own books, and your source for both numbers.
You are a dunce as a researcher:
https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/2053408-should-you-rate-your-own-book

"It really speaks to the unprofessional attitude of the author and is usually associated with ego-driven, self-published authors. It may be permitted here on GR, but readers do not appreciate it." - Yes, that's Will Dockery, all right.
Will Dockery
2019-12-02 00:39:08 UTC
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Post by NancyGene
Post by George J. Dance
Post by NancyGene
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
According to the majority of comments on Goodreads, it is tacky and cheesy for an author to rate his own book.
You constantly make vague claims like that, which you never back up. I'd like to see the statistics you're using for that claim. Please tell us how many comments there are on Goodreads, how many of those even mention authors rating their own books, and your source for both numbers.
https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/2053408-should-you-rate-your-own-book
"It really speaks to the unprofessional attitude of the author and is usually associated with ego-driven, self-published authors. It may be permitted here on GR, but readers do not appreciate it." - Yes, that's Will Dockery, all right.
Well, thanks for the heads up, N.G.

On that note, I just hit the "Clear Rating" button.

;)
George J. Dance
2019-12-02 19:36:35 UTC
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Post by NancyGene
Post by George J. Dance
Post by NancyGene
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
According to the majority of comments on Goodreads, it is tacky and cheesy for an author to rate his own book.
You constantly make vague claims like that, which you never back up. I'd like to see the statistics you're using for that claim. Please tell us how many comments there are on Goodreads, how many of those even mention authors rating their own books, and your source for both numbers.
https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/2053408-should-you-rate-your-own-book
You really are a buffoon as well as a baboon. Even if all 112 comments in that thread said the same thing (which they don't), a 112-comment thread is *not* "the majority of comments on Goodreads." There are 1,360 comments in that section alone.
Post by NancyGene
"It really speaks to the unprofessional attitude of the author and is usually associated with ego-driven, self-published authors. It may be permitted here on GR, but readers do not appreciate it." - Yes, that's Will Dockery, all right.
ME
2019-12-02 20:39:09 UTC
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Post by George J. Dance
Post by NancyGene
Post by George J. Dance
Post by NancyGene
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
According to the majority of comments on Goodreads, it is tacky and cheesy for an author to rate his own book.
You constantly make vague claims like that, which you never back up. I'd like to see the statistics you're using for that claim. Please tell us how many comments there are on Goodreads, how many of those even mention authors rating their own books, and your source for both numbers.
https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/2053408-should-you-rate-your-own-book
You really are a buffoon as well as a baboon. Even if all 112 comments in that thread said the same thing (which they don't), a 112-comment thread is *not* "the majority of comments on Goodreads." There are 1,360 comments in that section alone.
Post by NancyGene
"It really speaks to the unprofessional attitude of the author and is usually associated with ego-driven, self-published authors. It may be permitted here on GR, but readers do not appreciate it." - Yes, that's Will Dockery, all right.
And dunce, most of them say the same thing: any author that had to rate their own book is a loser.
Duh......
Zod The Mighty
2019-12-06 01:32:03 UTC
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Post by George J. Dance
Post by NancyGene
Post by George J. Dance
Post by NancyGene
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
According to the majority of comments on Goodreads, it is tacky and cheesy for an author to rate his own book.
You constantly make vague claims like that, which you never back up. I'd like to see the statistics you're using for that claim. Please tell us how many comments there are on Goodreads, how many of those even mention authors rating their own books, and your source for both numbers.
https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/2053408-should-you-rate-your-own-book
You really are a buffoon as well as a baboon. Even if all 112 comments in that thread said the same thing (which they don't), a 112-comment thread is *not* "the majority of comments on Goodreads." There are 1,360 comments in that section alone.
Post by NancyGene
"It really speaks to the unprofessional attitude of the author and is usually associated with ego-driven, self-published authors. It may be permitted here on GR, but readers do not appreciate it." - Yes, that's Will Dockery, all right.
You nailed it once more G.D.
Will Dockery
2019-12-06 14:18:35 UTC
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https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
Post by Zod The Mighty
Post by George J. Dance
Post by NancyGene
Post by George J. Dance
Post by NancyGene
According to the majority of comments on Goodreads, it is tacky and cheesy for an author to rate his own book.
You constantly make vague claims like that, which you never back up. I'd like to see the statistics you're using for that claim. Please tell us how many comments there are on Goodreads, how many of those even mention authors rating their own books, and your source for both numbers.
https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/2053408-should-you-rate-your-own-book
You really are a buffoon as well as a baboon. Even if all 112 comments in that thread said the same thing (which they don't), a 112-comment thread is *not* "the majority of comments on Goodreads." There are 1,360 comments in that section alone.
You nailed it once more G.D.
Yes, glad we got that settled.

;)
Z***@none.i2p
2019-12-06 14:23:58 UTC
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Will Dockery wrote on Fri, 06 December 2019 14:18
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
Post by Zod The Mighty
Post by George J. Dance
Post by NancyGene
Post by George J. Dance
Post by NancyGene
According to the majority of comments on Goodreads, it is tacky and cheesy for an author to rate his own book.
You constantly make vague claims like that, which you never back up. I'd like to see the statistics you're using for that claim. Please tell us how many comments there are on Goodreads, how many of those even mention authors rating their own books, and your source for both numbers.
https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/2053408-should-you-rate-your-own-book
You really are a buffoon as well as a baboon. Even if all 112 comments in that thread said the same thing (which they don't), a 112-comment thread is *not* "the majority of comments on Goodreads." There are 1,360 comments in that section alone.
You nailed it once more G.D.
Yes, glad we got that settled.
;)
Indeed.....!!

General Zod
2019-12-03 00:31:59 UTC
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Post by George J. Dance
Post by NancyGene
Post by George J. Dance
Post by NancyGene
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
According to the majority of comments on Goodreads, it is tacky and cheesy for an author to rate his own book.
You constantly make vague claims like that, which you never back up. I'd like to see the statistics you're using for that claim. Please tell us how many comments there are on Goodreads, how many of those even mention authors rating their own books, and your source for both numbers.
https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/2053408-should-you-rate-your-own-book
You really are a buffoon as well as a baboon. Even if all 112 comments in that thread said the same thing (which they don't), a 112-comment thread is *not* "the majority of comments on Goodreads." There are 1,360 comments in that section alone.
You got that right, G.D. !!
Will Dockery
2019-12-03 10:47:05 UTC
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Post by George J. Dance
Post by NancyGene
Post by George J. Dance
Post by NancyGene
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
According to the majority of comments on Goodreads, it is tacky and cheesy for an author to rate his own book.
You constantly make vague claims like that, which you never back up. I'd like to see the statistics you're using for that claim. Please tell us how many comments there are on Goodreads, how many of those even mention authors rating their own books, and your source for both numbers.
https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/2053408-should-you-rate-your-own-book
You really are a buffoon as well as a baboon. Even if all 112 comments in that thread said the same thing (which they don't), a 112-comment thread is *not* "the majority of comments on Goodreads." There are 1,360 comments in that section alone.
Post by NancyGene
"It really speaks to the unprofessional attitude of the author and is usually associated with ego-driven, self-published authors. It may be permitted here on GR, but readers do not appreciate it." - Yes, that's Will Dockery, all right.
So, it is opinion, not policy.

;)
Z***@none.i2p
2019-12-03 17:20:54 UTC
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Will Dockery wrote on Tue, 03 December 2019 10:47
Post by Will Dockery
Post by George J. Dance
Post by NancyGene
Post by George J. Dance
Post by NancyGene
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
According to the majority of comments on Goodreads, it is tacky and cheesy for an author to rate his own book.
You constantly make vague claims like that, which you never back up. I'd like to see the statistics you're using for that claim. Please tell us how many comments there are on Goodreads, how many of those even mention authors rating their own books, and your source for both numbers.
https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/2053408-should-you-rate-your-own-book
You really are a buffoon as well as a baboon. Even if all 112 comments in that thread said the same thing (which they don't), a 112-comment thread is *not* "the majority of comments on Goodreads." There are 1,360 comments in that section alone.
Post by NancyGene
"It really speaks to the unprofessional attitude of the author and is usually associated with ego-driven, self-published authors. It may be permitted here on GR, but readers do not appreciate it." - Yes, that's Will Dockery, all right.
So, it is opinion, not policy.
;)
yes yes

https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/19735398.Will_Dockery
Conley Brothers
2019-12-03 18:24:29 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Post by George J. Dance
Post by NancyGene
Post by George J. Dance
Post by NancyGene
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
According to the majority of comments on Goodreads, it is tacky and cheesy for an author to rate his own book.
You constantly make vague claims like that, which you never back up. I'd like to see the statistics you're using for that claim. Please tell us how many comments there are on Goodreads, how many of those even mention authors rating their own books, and your source for both numbers.
https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/2053408-should-you-rate-your-own-book
You really are a buffoon as well as a baboon. Even if all 112 comments in that thread said the same thing (which they don't), a 112-comment thread is *not* "the majority of comments on Goodreads." There are 1,360 comments in that section alone.
Post by NancyGene
"It really speaks to the unprofessional attitude of the author and is usually associated with ego-driven, self-published authors. It may be permitted here on GR, but readers do not appreciate it." - Yes, that's Will Dockery, all right.
So, it is opinion, not policy.
;)
Do you really think anyone thinks it a classy move to rate their own work? I see you've already created 5 socks to give you 5 stars. I suggest everyone here go rate that pile of shit paper you call a book.
NancyGene
2019-12-03 18:39:55 UTC
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Post by Conley Brothers
Post by Will Dockery
Post by George J. Dance
Post by NancyGene
Post by George J. Dance
Post by NancyGene
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
According to the majority of comments on Goodreads, it is tacky and cheesy for an author to rate his own book.
You constantly make vague claims like that, which you never back up. I'd like to see the statistics you're using for that claim. Please tell us how many comments there are on Goodreads, how many of those even mention authors rating their own books, and your source for both numbers.
https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/2053408-should-you-rate-your-own-book
You really are a buffoon as well as a baboon. Even if all 112 comments in that thread said the same thing (which they don't), a 112-comment thread is *not* "the majority of comments on Goodreads." There are 1,360 comments in that section alone.
Post by NancyGene
"It really speaks to the unprofessional attitude of the author and is usually associated with ego-driven, self-published authors. It may be permitted here on GR, but readers do not appreciate it." - Yes, that's Will Dockery, all right.
So, it is opinion, not policy.
;)
Do you really think anyone thinks it a classy move to rate their own work? I see you've already created 5 socks to give you 5 stars. I suggest everyone here go rate that pile of shit paper you call a book.
We see his daughter, his son-in-law, Zid, and Ibish there. We will ask our friends to rate the book.
George J. Dance
2019-12-03 22:02:04 UTC
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Post by NancyGene
"It really speaks to the unprofessional attitude of the author and is usually associated with ego-driven, self-published authors. It may be permitted here on GR, but readers do not appreciate it." - Yes, that's Will Dockery, all right.
What a coincidence; i've noticed comments on the same thread that describe you and the other apes quite well, too:

<quote>
message 46: by SharonOct 26, 2014 06:24AM
Sharon Connell (sharonkconnell) | 114 commentsOkay...this is the first time I've seen such bickering on this site and I feel like I've fallen into some kind of a bad dream with children throwing insults back and forth on a playground. Sorry, but that's what it sounds like to me. It seems to be an exchange of insults, no longer constructive criticism but trying to outdo one another and force the opponent to agree with what you think.

Why don't you send each other PMs instead of taking up space here where we could actually learn something positive from one another. CONSTRUCTIVE CRITICISM, that's what I'm looking for.

Granted, I'm only the newbie on this site, but this tread seems out of control! Go ahead now, shoot me down for saying it.

flag *
message 47: by JackOct 26, 2014 06:32AM
Jack Knapp | 753 comments
Mod
No shootdown; well said, Sharon.

flag *
message 48: by SharonOct 26, 2014 06:37AM
Sharon Connell (sharonkconnell) | 114 commentsThank you, Jack.

flag *
message 49: by JackOct 26, 2014 06:40AM
Jack Knapp | 753 comments
Mod
There's entirely too much of this that occasionally pops up here. I will say that the moderators generally are quick when they spot it, but that shouldn't discourage you or anyone from calling out childish exchanges.
</q>
General Zod
2019-12-02 02:54:37 UTC
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Post by George J. Dance
Post by NancyGene
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
According to the majority of comments on Goodreads, it is tacky and cheesy for an author to rate his own book.
You constantly make vague claims like that, which you never back up. I'd like to see the statistics you're using for that claim. Please tell us how many comments there are on Goodreads, how many of those even mention authors rating their own books, and your source for both numbers.
You nailed it G.D.

Nancy G. will stalk, and what it doesn't find out from stalking, it makes up ….!!

Truly fake news....!!!
Z***@none.i2p
2019-12-02 05:41:52 UTC
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George J. Dance wrote on Sun, 01 December 2019 22:46
Post by George J. Dance
Post by NancyGene
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
According to the majority of comments on Goodreads, it is tacky and cheesy for an author to rate his own book.
You constantly make vague claims like that, which you never back up. I'd like to see the statistics you're using for that claim. Please tell us how many comments there are on Goodreads, how many of those even mention authors rating their own books, and your source for both numbers.
Well put G.D.
Me
2019-12-02 00:03:47 UTC
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Post by NancyGene
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
According to the majority of comments on Goodreads, it is tacky and cheesy for an author to rate his own book.
NN, just do like I do. Report it as spam.
Will Dockery
2019-12-02 00:25:35 UTC
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Post by Me
Post by NancyGene
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
According to the majority of comments on Goodreads
NN, just do like I do. Report it as spam.
Since it really isn't spam, what difference will a false report make?

;)
General Zod
2019-12-04 07:44:47 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Post by Me
Post by NancyGene
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
According to the majority of comments on Goodreads
NN, just do like I do. Report it as spam.
Since it really isn't spam, what difference will a false report make?
;)
If it poetry oriented it is not spam here on the poetry group...
Clay Dockery
2019-12-04 19:39:58 UTC
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Poor Will Dockery, further embarrassing himself by screaming about trolls on his pile of shit book page. Your sock accounts giving 5 stars are obvious. You even made an account up for Sarah, you poor slob. Are you going to dig Mom up too for another 5 stars?
Will Dockery
2019-12-04 19:52:44 UTC
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Post by Clay Dockery
Poor Will Dockery
<lies snipped>

You're the pathetic one, cowardly hiding behind your malicious impersonation, forgery and identity theft.
Me
2019-12-04 20:39:47 UTC
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Post by Me
Post by NancyGene
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
According to the majority of comments on Goodreads, it is tacky and cheesy for an author to rate his own book.
NN, just do like I do. Report it as spam.
Oh dear. I made a typo.
I meant to post: NG.

Also, sometimes, you just have to take it to real life.
For ME, it’s nothing more than a well placed phone call.
General Zod
2019-12-04 23:54:34 UTC
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Post by Me
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
Also, sometimes, you just have to take it to real life.
For ME, it’s nothing more than a well placed phone call.
Your stalker mentality is well know here.......
ME
2019-12-04 23:57:00 UTC
Reply
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Post by General Zod
Post by Me
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
Also, sometimes, you just have to take it to real life.
For ME, it’s nothing more than a well placed phone call.
Your stalker mentality is well know here.......
Y’all want to talk about real people and real life here.
ME
2019-12-04 23:58:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by General Zod
Post by Me
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
Also, sometimes, you just have to take it to real life.
For ME, it’s nothing more than a well placed phone call.
Your stalker mentality is well know here.......
It’s not stalking if y’all supply the information.
General Zod
2019-12-05 00:00:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by ME
Post by General Zod
Post by Me
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
Also, sometimes, you just have to take it to real life.
For ME, it’s nothing more than a well placed phone call.
Your stalker mentality is well know here.......
It’s not stalking if y’all supply the information.
Making phone calls about people is harassment, if not stalking......
ME
2019-12-05 00:11:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by General Zod
Post by ME
Post by General Zod
Post by Me
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
Also, sometimes, you just have to take it to real life.
For ME, it’s nothing more than a well placed phone call.
Your stalker mentality is well know here.......
It’s not stalking if y’all supply the information.
Making phone calls about people is harassment, if not stalking......
No it’s not.
It’s about real life.
If y’all don’t want to talk about just poetry here, but want to share the intimate details of your life and others here, then don’t bitch and whine when that information comes back to bite you in the ass.
General Zod
2019-12-05 00:12:53 UTC
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Post by ME
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
It’s about real life.
What reason would you have to make phone calls to the newspaper about Doc for....>
ME
2019-12-05 00:22:03 UTC
Reply
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Post by General Zod
Post by ME
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
It’s about real life.
What reason would you have to make phone calls to the newspaper about Doc for....>
Well, pissbum, it would stand to reason if you want to sell a book,it might be a good idea to begin with your local target audience. For you, that would only be the shallowville idiots.
Haven’t they been the driving force behind your popularity and notoriety in shallowvilke?
Maybe zid can busk them, with the fellow bums, in front of ledgends, so ho club, FHC and all the other establishments there.
W***@none.i2p
2019-12-05 00:30:33 UTC
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ME[8
Post by ME
Post by General Zod
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
It's about real life.
What reason would you have to make phone calls to the newspaper about Doc for....>
if you want to sell a book,it might be a good idea to begin with your local target audience. For you
Why you'd care enough to call the newspaper interests me, though....
ME
2019-12-05 00:38:11 UTC
Reply
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Post by W***@none.i2p
ME[8
Post by ME
Post by General Zod
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
It's about real life.
What reason would you have to make phone calls to the newspaper about Doc for....>
if you want to sell a book,it might be a good idea to begin with your local target audience. For you
Why you'd care enough to call the newspaper interests me, though....
I’m glad.
General Zod
2019-12-05 00:39:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by ME
Post by W***@none.i2p
Post by ME
Post by General Zod
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
It's about real life.
What reason would you have to make phone calls to the newspaper about Doc for....>
if you want to sell a book,it might be a good idea to begin with your local target audience. For you
Why you'd care enough to call the newspaper interests me, though....
I’m glad.
You are trying to help Doc for a change....?
General Zod
2019-12-05 00:38:37 UTC
Reply
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Post by ME
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
It’s about real life.
The poetry is.....??
ME
2019-12-05 00:41:26 UTC
Reply
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Post by General Zod
Post by ME
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
It’s about real life.
The poetry is.....??
No. What y’all share here.
General Zod
2019-12-05 00:42:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by ME
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
Post by ME
It’s about real life.
The poetry is.....??
No. What y’all share here.
The reason why you go real life is...?
Will Dockery
2019-12-05 20:36:36 UTC
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https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
Post by ME
Post by General Zod
Post by Me
Also, sometimes, you just have to take it to real life.
For ME, it’s nothing more than a well placed phone call.
Your stalker mentality is well know here.......
It’s not stalking if y’all supply the information.
Calling people on the phone with a malicious intent is harassment, which is a definite stalker sign, not to mention a cyberbully tactic.

;)
Edward Rochester Esq.
2019-12-05 20:42:19 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
Post by ME
Post by General Zod
Post by Me
Also, sometimes, you just have to take it to real life.
For ME, it’s nothing more than a well placed phone call.
Your stalker mentality is well know here.......
It’s not stalking if y’all supply the information.
Calling people on the phone with a malicious intent is harassment, which is a definite stalker sign, not to mention a cyberbully tactic.
;)
any publicity is good publicity
Will Dockery
2019-12-05 21:18:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Edward Rochester Esq.
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
any publicity is good publicity
Here's an article the local newspaper did on Dan Barfield, for which I was interviewed, written by Tim Chitwood, who is still a reporter for the Columbus Ledger-Enquirer:

https://groups.google.com/d/msg/alt.arts.poetry.comments/SAYiwgoSyJE/9w0GYQ4gBBcJ

---------------------

Columbus Ledger-Enquirer (GA)
July 13, 1997
Section: LOCAL
Edition: FIRST
Page: B1

HOW GROSS THY ART
Tim Chitwood

Apparently it was all just a big misunderstanding.

The misunderstanding led to a 911 call about a decomposing body in an
old house M***** S*****'s husband R****** owns at 2113 **th St. in
Columbus. That led to the discovery that it wasn't a body after all,
but artwork made of barbed wire and blowtorched Barbie dolls.
But it sure looked like a body to police. And it looked like a body to
paramedics. And it definitely looked like a body to Danny W****.

Danny is a real estate agent who with M***** went to look at the house
July 2. He wanted to buy it and fix it up. It needs fixing up. The
roof leaks in places and some of the floor's rotting. The S**** now
live on F**** Drive and use the **th Street house for storage.
M*****'s son Will Dockery lets friends -- artists, poets and madmen,
Will says -- store their work there.

Among those artists is Dan Barfield, who has a concept piece called
``Vietnam,'' part of which the veteran made of melted Barbie dolls.
(``He hates Barbies,'' says his wife Judy.) It now lies on the floor
among other stuff stored in the dark, northwest bedroom of the ##th
Street house. To someone who didn't know what it was, it might look
like a rib cage and sternum atop decayed matter.

That's what it looked like to Danny W**** when he walked into that
musty room, first staring up at the rafters. Then he looked down. Then
he froze. Then he ran.

He wasn't sure what he saw. Maybe a body. Maybe it was sealed with
wax, which trapped the odor. Maybe this was a bizarre ritual. Maybe he
didn't want to know.

M***** followed Danny as he dashed outside, where he tried to make a
call on his cell phone. She told him not to. According to her, she
told him he'd just seen some artwork. According to Danny, she never
said that; she just said they didn't need the police coming there.

This did not sound reassuring. Danny had to make that call. Now don't
call the police, M***** said again. She says she also told Danny her
son Will had a bad temper, and he wouldn't like Danny calling the
police.

She says Danny replied that the police wouldn't do anything to her;
she wasn't involved. That's true, she said (she wasn't involved in
storing the art), but the police needn't be bothered.

M***** claims Danny then offered her $13,000 for the house, then said
it needed so much work the most he could give her was $10,000.

Danny maintains all M***** did was tell him no one should call the
police.

The next day, someone called the police.

About 10:30 a.m., police and paramedics rushed to the house, unboarded
a door to get in and examined what they, too, thought was a decaying
body, oddly odorless. Then they poked it and figured out it wasn't. It
was such a weird story, the Ledger-Enquirer ran it on the front page
July 4.

That's how M****** learned police had broken into the house. She was
perturbed. She blamed Danny.

Danny won't say he called police, but admits he told someone what he
thought he saw. Stan Swiney of the 911 center says the call reportedly
came from a Billy Hanson. (No Billy Hanson listed in the Columbus
telephone directory was involved; I called.)

The 911 report said someone saw the alleged corpse through a window.
That's difficult: The room's dark; the window's dirty; the art's hard
to see.

The artist, Dan Barfield, says it's funny Danny W**** would be
frightened, because the real estate agent stopped by a few months ago
when Dan was moving art into the house, and this piece was out on the
lawn at the time. The artist claims the agent told him a decayed body
was found in the house once.

Danny says that's outrageous: He has never met Dan Barfield. ``I would
remember that,'' he says.

Danny says he just wanted to buy the house to help clean up the
neighborhood, where he owns other property. ``As far as I'm concerned
now, they couldn't give it to me,'' he says.

Perhaps it will remain the house of scary art, where once people
thought they saw a dead body.

But didn't.

-------------------------------

https://groups.google.com/d/msg/alt.arts.poetry.comments/SAYiwgoSyJE/9w0GYQ4gBBcJ
Michael Pendragon
2019-12-05 21:27:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Edward Rochester Esq.
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
any publicity is good publicity
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/alt.arts.poetry.comments/SAYiwgoSyJE/9w0GYQ4gBBcJ
---------------------
Columbus Ledger-Enquirer (GA)
July 13, 1997
Section: LOCAL
Edition: FIRST
Page: B1
HOW GROSS THY ART
Tim Chitwood
Apparently it was all just a big misunderstanding.
The misunderstanding led to a 911 call about a decomposing body in an
old house M***** S*****'s husband R****** owns at 2113 **th St. in
Columbus. That led to the discovery that it wasn't a body after all,
but artwork made of barbed wire and blowtorched Barbie dolls.
But it sure looked like a body to police. And it looked like a body to
paramedics. And it definitely looked like a body to Danny W****.
Danny is a real estate agent who with M***** went to look at the house
July 2. He wanted to buy it and fix it up. It needs fixing up. The
roof leaks in places and some of the floor's rotting. The S**** now
live on F**** Drive and use the **th Street house for storage.
M*****'s son Will Dockery lets friends -- artists, poets and madmen,
Will says -- store their work there.
Among those artists is Dan Barfield, who has a concept piece called
``Vietnam,'' part of which the veteran made of melted Barbie dolls.
(``He hates Barbies,'' says his wife Judy.) It now lies on the floor
among other stuff stored in the dark, northwest bedroom of the ##th
Street house. To someone who didn't know what it was, it might look
like a rib cage and sternum atop decayed matter.
That's what it looked like to Danny W**** when he walked into that
musty room, first staring up at the rafters. Then he looked down. Then
he froze. Then he ran.
He wasn't sure what he saw. Maybe a body. Maybe it was sealed with
wax, which trapped the odor. Maybe this was a bizarre ritual. Maybe he
didn't want to know.
M***** followed Danny as he dashed outside, where he tried to make a
call on his cell phone. She told him not to. According to her, she
told him he'd just seen some artwork. According to Danny, she never
said that; she just said they didn't need the police coming there.
This did not sound reassuring. Danny had to make that call. Now don't
call the police, M***** said again. She says she also told Danny her
son Will had a bad temper, and he wouldn't like Danny calling the
police.
She says Danny replied that the police wouldn't do anything to her;
she wasn't involved. That's true, she said (she wasn't involved in
storing the art), but the police needn't be bothered.
M***** claims Danny then offered her $13,000 for the house, then said
it needed so much work the most he could give her was $10,000.
Danny maintains all M***** did was tell him no one should call the
police.
The next day, someone called the police.
About 10:30 a.m., police and paramedics rushed to the house, unboarded
a door to get in and examined what they, too, thought was a decaying
body, oddly odorless. Then they poked it and figured out it wasn't. It
was such a weird story, the Ledger-Enquirer ran it on the front page
July 4.
That's how M****** learned police had broken into the house. She was
perturbed. She blamed Danny.
Danny won't say he called police, but admits he told someone what he
thought he saw. Stan Swiney of the 911 center says the call reportedly
came from a Billy Hanson. (No Billy Hanson listed in the Columbus
telephone directory was involved; I called.)
The 911 report said someone saw the alleged corpse through a window.
That's difficult: The room's dark; the window's dirty; the art's hard
to see.
The artist, Dan Barfield, says it's funny Danny W**** would be
frightened, because the real estate agent stopped by a few months ago
when Dan was moving art into the house, and this piece was out on the
lawn at the time. The artist claims the agent told him a decayed body
was found in the house once.
Danny says that's outrageous: He has never met Dan Barfield. ``I would
remember that,'' he says.
Danny says he just wanted to buy the house to help clean up the
neighborhood, where he owns other property. ``As far as I'm concerned
now, they couldn't give it to me,'' he says.
Perhaps it will remain the house of scary art, where once people
thought they saw a dead body.
But didn't.
-------------------------------
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/alt.arts.poetry.comments/SAYiwgoSyJE/9w0GYQ4gBBcJ
Cue the banjos.


ME
2019-12-05 21:28:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Edward Rochester Esq.
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
any publicity is good publicity
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/alt.arts.poetry.comments/SAYiwgoSyJE/9w0GYQ4gBBcJ
---------------------
Columbus Ledger-Enquirer (GA)
July 13, 1997
Section: LOCAL
Edition: FIRST
Page: B1
HOW GROSS THY ART
Tim Chitwood
Apparently it was all just a big misunderstanding.
The misunderstanding led to a 911 call about a decomposing body in an
old house M***** S*****'s husband R****** owns at 2113 **th St. in
Columbus. That led to the discovery that it wasn't a body after all,
but artwork made of barbed wire and blowtorched Barbie dolls.
But it sure looked like a body to police. And it looked like a body to
paramedics. And it definitely looked like a body to Danny W****.
Danny is a real estate agent who with M***** went to look at the house
July 2. He wanted to buy it and fix it up. It needs fixing up. The
roof leaks in places and some of the floor's rotting. The S**** now
live on F**** Drive and use the **th Street house for storage.
M*****'s son Will Dockery lets friends -- artists, poets and madmen,
Will says -- store their work there.
Among those artists is Dan Barfield, who has a concept piece called
``Vietnam,'' part of which the veteran made of melted Barbie dolls.
(``He hates Barbies,'' says his wife Judy.) It now lies on the floor
among other stuff stored in the dark, northwest bedroom of the ##th
Street house. To someone who didn't know what it was, it might look
like a rib cage and sternum atop decayed matter.
That's what it looked like to Danny W**** when he walked into that
musty room, first staring up at the rafters. Then he looked down. Then
he froze. Then he ran.
He wasn't sure what he saw. Maybe a body. Maybe it was sealed with
wax, which trapped the odor. Maybe this was a bizarre ritual. Maybe he
didn't want to know.
M***** followed Danny as he dashed outside, where he tried to make a
call on his cell phone. She told him not to. According to her, she
told him he'd just seen some artwork. According to Danny, she never
said that; she just said they didn't need the police coming there.
This did not sound reassuring. Danny had to make that call. Now don't
call the police, M***** said again. She says she also told Danny her
son Will had a bad temper, and he wouldn't like Danny calling the
police.
She says Danny replied that the police wouldn't do anything to her;
she wasn't involved. That's true, she said (she wasn't involved in
storing the art), but the police needn't be bothered.
M***** claims Danny then offered her $13,000 for the house, then said
it needed so much work the most he could give her was $10,000.
Danny maintains all M***** did was tell him no one should call the
police.
The next day, someone called the police.
About 10:30 a.m., police and paramedics rushed to the house, unboarded
a door to get in and examined what they, too, thought was a decaying
body, oddly odorless. Then they poked it and figured out it wasn't. It
was such a weird story, the Ledger-Enquirer ran it on the front page
July 4.
That's how M****** learned police had broken into the house. She was
perturbed. She blamed Danny.
Danny won't say he called police, but admits he told someone what he
thought he saw. Stan Swiney of the 911 center says the call reportedly
came from a Billy Hanson. (No Billy Hanson listed in the Columbus
telephone directory was involved; I called.)
The 911 report said someone saw the alleged corpse through a window.
That's difficult: The room's dark; the window's dirty; the art's hard
to see.
The artist, Dan Barfield, says it's funny Danny W**** would be
frightened, because the real estate agent stopped by a few months ago
when Dan was moving art into the house, and this piece was out on the
lawn at the time. The artist claims the agent told him a decayed body
was found in the house once.
Danny says that's outrageous: He has never met Dan Barfield. ``I would
remember that,'' he says.
Danny says he just wanted to buy the house to help clean up the
neighborhood, where he owns other property. ``As far as I'm concerned
now, they couldn't give it to me,'' he says.
Perhaps it will remain the house of scary art, where once people
thought they saw a dead body.
But didn't.
-------------------------------
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/alt.arts.poetry.comments/SAYiwgoSyJE/9w0GYQ4gBBcJ
You weren’t interviewed. The real estate agent, barfly and your mother was.
The part where she tells the real estate guy not to call the cops because you have a bad temper is hilarious.
But you still post this as if it’s something you’re proud to be associated with. You are one fucked up individual.
Have you dropped off a copy of your chapbook? Most interviewers like to be informed before they interview someone. Just a heads up on that.
ME
2019-12-05 21:35:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Edward Rochester Esq.
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
any publicity is good publicity
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/alt.arts.poetry.comments/SAYiwgoSyJE/9w0GYQ4gBBcJ
---------------------
Columbus Ledger-Enquirer (GA)
July 13, 1997
Section: LOCAL
Edition: FIRST
Page: B1
HOW GROSS THY ART
Tim Chitwood
Apparently it was all just a big misunderstanding.
The misunderstanding led to a 911 call about a decomposing body in an
old house M***** S*****'s husband R****** owns at 2113 **th St. in
Columbus. That led to the discovery that it wasn't a body after all,
but artwork made of barbed wire and blowtorched Barbie dolls.
But it sure looked like a body to police. And it looked like a body to
paramedics. And it definitely looked like a body to Danny W****.
Danny is a real estate agent who with M***** went to look at the house
July 2. He wanted to buy it and fix it up. It needs fixing up. The
roof leaks in places and some of the floor's rotting. The S**** now
live on F**** Drive and use the **th Street house for storage.
M*****'s son Will Dockery lets friends -- artists, poets and madmen,
Will says -- store their work there.
Among those artists is Dan Barfield, who has a concept piece called
``Vietnam,'' part of which the veteran made of melted Barbie dolls.
(``He hates Barbies,'' says his wife Judy.) It now lies on the floor
among other stuff stored in the dark, northwest bedroom of the ##th
Street house. To someone who didn't know what it was, it might look
like a rib cage and sternum atop decayed matter.
That's what it looked like to Danny W**** when he walked into that
musty room, first staring up at the rafters. Then he looked down. Then
he froze. Then he ran.
He wasn't sure what he saw. Maybe a body. Maybe it was sealed with
wax, which trapped the odor. Maybe this was a bizarre ritual. Maybe he
didn't want to know.
M***** followed Danny as he dashed outside, where he tried to make a
call on his cell phone. She told him not to. According to her, she
told him he'd just seen some artwork. According to Danny, she never
said that; she just said they didn't need the police coming there.
This did not sound reassuring. Danny had to make that call. Now don't
call the police, M***** said again. She says she also told Danny her
son Will had a bad temper, and he wouldn't like Danny calling the
police.
She says Danny replied that the police wouldn't do anything to her;
she wasn't involved. That's true, she said (she wasn't involved in
storing the art), but the police needn't be bothered.
M***** claims Danny then offered her $13,000 for the house, then said
it needed so much work the most he could give her was $10,000.
Danny maintains all M***** did was tell him no one should call the
police.
The next day, someone called the police.
About 10:30 a.m., police and paramedics rushed to the house, unboarded
a door to get in and examined what they, too, thought was a decaying
body, oddly odorless. Then they poked it and figured out it wasn't. It
was such a weird story, the Ledger-Enquirer ran it on the front page
July 4.
That's how M****** learned police had broken into the house. She was
perturbed. She blamed Danny.
Danny won't say he called police, but admits he told someone what he
thought he saw. Stan Swiney of the 911 center says the call reportedly
came from a Billy Hanson. (No Billy Hanson listed in the Columbus
telephone directory was involved; I called.)
The 911 report said someone saw the alleged corpse through a window.
That's difficult: The room's dark; the window's dirty; the art's hard
to see.
The artist, Dan Barfield, says it's funny Danny W**** would be
frightened, because the real estate agent stopped by a few months ago
when Dan was moving art into the house, and this piece was out on the
lawn at the time. The artist claims the agent told him a decayed body
was found in the house once.
Danny says that's outrageous: He has never met Dan Barfield. ``I would
remember that,'' he says.
Danny says he just wanted to buy the house to help clean up the
neighborhood, where he owns other property. ``As far as I'm concerned
now, they couldn't give it to me,'' he says.
Perhaps it will remain the house of scary art, where once people
thought they saw a dead body.
But didn't.
-------------------------------
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/alt.arts.poetry.comments/SAYiwgoSyJE/9w0GYQ4gBBcJ
You weren’t interviewed. The real estate agent, barfly and your mother were.
The part where she tells the real estate guy not to call the cops because you have a bad temper is hilarious.
But you still post this as if it’s something you’re proud to be associated with. You are one fucked up individual.
Have you dropped off a copy of your chapbook? Most interviewers like to be informed before they interview someone. Just a heads up on that.
Will Dockery
2019-12-05 21:46:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by ME
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Edward Rochester Esq.
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
any publicity is good publicity
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/alt.arts.poetry.comments/SAYiwgoSyJE/9w0GYQ4gBBcJ
---------------------
Columbus Ledger-Enquirer (GA)
July 13, 1997
Section: LOCAL
Edition: FIRST
Page: B1
HOW GROSS THY ART
Tim Chitwood
Apparently it was all just a big misunderstanding.
The misunderstanding led to a 911 call about a decomposing body in an
old house M***** S*****'s husband R****** owns at 2113 **th St. in
Columbus. That led to the discovery that it wasn't a body after all,
but artwork made of barbed wire and blowtorched Barbie dolls.
But it sure looked like a body to police. And it looked like a body to
paramedics. And it definitely looked like a body to Danny W****.
Danny is a real estate agent who with M***** went to look at the house
July 2. He wanted to buy it and fix it up. It needs fixing up. The
roof leaks in places and some of the floor's rotting. The S**** now
live on F**** Drive and use the **th Street house for storage.
M*****'s son Will Dockery lets friends -- artists, poets and madmen,
Will says -- store their work there.
Among those artists is Dan Barfield, who has a concept piece called
``Vietnam,'' part of which the veteran made of melted Barbie dolls.
(``He hates Barbies,'' says his wife Judy.) It now lies on the floor
among other stuff stored in the dark, northwest bedroom of the ##th
Street house. To someone who didn't know what it was, it might look
like a rib cage and sternum atop decayed matter.
That's what it looked like to Danny W**** when he walked into that
musty room, first staring up at the rafters. Then he looked down. Then
he froze. Then he ran.
He wasn't sure what he saw. Maybe a body. Maybe it was sealed with
wax, which trapped the odor. Maybe this was a bizarre ritual. Maybe he
didn't want to know.
M***** followed Danny as he dashed outside, where he tried to make a
call on his cell phone. She told him not to. According to her, she
told him he'd just seen some artwork. According to Danny, she never
said that; she just said they didn't need the police coming there.
This did not sound reassuring. Danny had to make that call. Now don't
call the police, M***** said again. She says she also told Danny her
son Will had a bad temper, and he wouldn't like Danny calling the
police.
She says Danny replied that the police wouldn't do anything to her;
she wasn't involved. That's true, she said (she wasn't involved in
storing the art), but the police needn't be bothered.
M***** claims Danny then offered her $13,000 for the house, then said
it needed so much work the most he could give her was $10,000.
Danny maintains all M***** did was tell him no one should call the
police.
The next day, someone called the police.
About 10:30 a.m., police and paramedics rushed to the house, unboarded
a door to get in and examined what they, too, thought was a decaying
body, oddly odorless. Then they poked it and figured out it wasn't. It
was such a weird story, the Ledger-Enquirer ran it on the front page
July 4.
That's how M****** learned police had broken into the house. She was
perturbed. She blamed Danny.
Danny won't say he called police, but admits he told someone what he
thought he saw. Stan Swiney of the 911 center says the call reportedly
came from a Billy Hanson. (No Billy Hanson listed in the Columbus
telephone directory was involved; I called.)
The 911 report said someone saw the alleged corpse through a window.
That's difficult: The room's dark; the window's dirty; the art's hard
to see.
The artist, Dan Barfield, says it's funny Danny W**** would be
frightened, because the real estate agent stopped by a few months ago
when Dan was moving art into the house, and this piece was out on the
lawn at the time. The artist claims the agent told him a decayed body
was found in the house once.
Danny says that's outrageous: He has never met Dan Barfield. ``I would
remember that,'' he says.
Danny says he just wanted to buy the house to help clean up the
neighborhood, where he owns other property. ``As far as I'm concerned
now, they couldn't give it to me,'' he says.
Perhaps it will remain the house of scary art, where once people
thought they saw a dead body.
But didn't.
-------------------------------
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/alt.arts.poetry.comments/SAYiwgoSyJE/9w0GYQ4gBBcJ
You weren’t interviewed
Yes I was, I was the person who met Chitwood and the photographer at the house, and the article included a color photo of me holding one of Dan Barfield's paintings.
Michael Pendragon
2019-12-05 21:57:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by ME
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Edward Rochester Esq.
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
any publicity is good publicity
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/alt.arts.poetry.comments/SAYiwgoSyJE/9w0GYQ4gBBcJ
---------------------
Columbus Ledger-Enquirer (GA)
July 13, 1997
Section: LOCAL
Edition: FIRST
Page: B1
HOW GROSS THY ART
Tim Chitwood
Apparently it was all just a big misunderstanding.
The misunderstanding led to a 911 call about a decomposing body in an
old house M***** S*****'s husband R****** owns at 2113 **th St. in
Columbus. That led to the discovery that it wasn't a body after all,
but artwork made of barbed wire and blowtorched Barbie dolls.
But it sure looked like a body to police. And it looked like a body to
paramedics. And it definitely looked like a body to Danny W****.
Danny is a real estate agent who with M***** went to look at the house
July 2. He wanted to buy it and fix it up. It needs fixing up. The
roof leaks in places and some of the floor's rotting. The S**** now
live on F**** Drive and use the **th Street house for storage.
M*****'s son Will Dockery lets friends -- artists, poets and madmen,
Will says -- store their work there.
Among those artists is Dan Barfield, who has a concept piece called
``Vietnam,'' part of which the veteran made of melted Barbie dolls.
(``He hates Barbies,'' says his wife Judy.) It now lies on the floor
among other stuff stored in the dark, northwest bedroom of the ##th
Street house. To someone who didn't know what it was, it might look
like a rib cage and sternum atop decayed matter.
That's what it looked like to Danny W**** when he walked into that
musty room, first staring up at the rafters. Then he looked down. Then
he froze. Then he ran.
He wasn't sure what he saw. Maybe a body. Maybe it was sealed with
wax, which trapped the odor. Maybe this was a bizarre ritual. Maybe he
didn't want to know.
M***** followed Danny as he dashed outside, where he tried to make a
call on his cell phone. She told him not to. According to her, she
told him he'd just seen some artwork. According to Danny, she never
said that; she just said they didn't need the police coming there.
This did not sound reassuring. Danny had to make that call. Now don't
call the police, M***** said again. She says she also told Danny her
son Will had a bad temper, and he wouldn't like Danny calling the
police.
She says Danny replied that the police wouldn't do anything to her;
she wasn't involved. That's true, she said (she wasn't involved in
storing the art), but the police needn't be bothered.
M***** claims Danny then offered her $13,000 for the house, then said
it needed so much work the most he could give her was $10,000.
Danny maintains all M***** did was tell him no one should call the
police.
The next day, someone called the police.
About 10:30 a.m., police and paramedics rushed to the house, unboarded
a door to get in and examined what they, too, thought was a decaying
body, oddly odorless. Then they poked it and figured out it wasn't. It
was such a weird story, the Ledger-Enquirer ran it on the front page
July 4.
That's how M****** learned police had broken into the house. She was
perturbed. She blamed Danny.
Danny won't say he called police, but admits he told someone what he
thought he saw. Stan Swiney of the 911 center says the call reportedly
came from a Billy Hanson. (No Billy Hanson listed in the Columbus
telephone directory was involved; I called.)
The 911 report said someone saw the alleged corpse through a window.
That's difficult: The room's dark; the window's dirty; the art's hard
to see.
The artist, Dan Barfield, says it's funny Danny W**** would be
frightened, because the real estate agent stopped by a few months ago
when Dan was moving art into the house, and this piece was out on the
lawn at the time. The artist claims the agent told him a decayed body
was found in the house once.
Danny says that's outrageous: He has never met Dan Barfield. ``I would
remember that,'' he says.
Danny says he just wanted to buy the house to help clean up the
neighborhood, where he owns other property. ``As far as I'm concerned
now, they couldn't give it to me,'' he says.
Perhaps it will remain the house of scary art, where once people
thought they saw a dead body.
But didn't.
-------------------------------
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/alt.arts.poetry.comments/SAYiwgoSyJE/9w0GYQ4gBBcJ
You weren’t interviewed
Yes I was, I was the person who met Chitwood and the photographer at the house, and the article included a color photo of me holding one of Dan Barfield's paintings.
Well, GOLL-EEEEEE!
Will Dockery
2019-12-05 22:05:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by ME
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Edward Rochester Esq.
any publicity is good publicity
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/alt.arts.poetry.comments/SAYiwgoSyJE/9w0GYQ4gBBcJ
---------------------
Columbus Ledger-Enquirer (GA)
July 13, 1997
Section: LOCAL
Edition: FIRST
Page: B1
HOW GROSS THY ART
Tim Chitwood
Apparently it was all just a big misunderstanding.
The misunderstanding led to a 911 call about a decomposing body in an
old house M***** S*****'s husband R****** owns at 2113 **th St. in
Columbus. That led to the discovery that it wasn't a body after all,
but artwork made of barbed wire and blowtorched Barbie dolls.
But it sure looked like a body to police. And it looked like a body to
paramedics. And it definitely looked like a body to Danny W****.
Danny is a real estate agent who with M***** went to look at the house
July 2. He wanted to buy it and fix it up. It needs fixing up. The
roof leaks in places and some of the floor's rotting. The S**** now
live on F**** Drive and use the **th Street house for storage.
M*****'s son Will Dockery lets friends -- artists, poets and madmen,
Will says -- store their work there.
Among those artists is Dan Barfield, who has a concept piece called
``Vietnam,'' part of which the veteran made of melted Barbie dolls.
(``He hates Barbies,'' says his wife Judy.) It now lies on the floor
among other stuff stored in the dark, northwest bedroom of the ##th
Street house. To someone who didn't know what it was, it might look
like a rib cage and sternum atop decayed matter.
That's what it looked like to Danny W**** when he walked into that
musty room, first staring up at the rafters. Then he looked down. Then
he froze. Then he ran.
He wasn't sure what he saw. Maybe a body. Maybe it was sealed with
wax, which trapped the odor. Maybe this was a bizarre ritual. Maybe he
didn't want to know.
M***** followed Danny as he dashed outside, where he tried to make a
call on his cell phone. She told him not to. According to her, she
told him he'd just seen some artwork. According to Danny, she never
said that; she just said they didn't need the police coming there.
This did not sound reassuring. Danny had to make that call. Now don't
call the police, M***** said again. She says she also told Danny her
son Will had a bad temper, and he wouldn't like Danny calling the
police.
She says Danny replied that the police wouldn't do anything to her;
she wasn't involved. That's true, she said (she wasn't involved in
storing the art), but the police needn't be bothered.
M***** claims Danny then offered her $13,000 for the house, then said
it needed so much work the most he could give her was $10,000.
Danny maintains all M***** did was tell him no one should call the
police.
The next day, someone called the police.
About 10:30 a.m., police and paramedics rushed to the house, unboarded
a door to get in and examined what they, too, thought was a decaying
body, oddly odorless. Then they poked it and figured out it wasn't. It
was such a weird story, the Ledger-Enquirer ran it on the front page
July 4.
That's how M****** learned police had broken into the house. She was
perturbed. She blamed Danny.
Danny won't say he called police, but admits he told someone what he
thought he saw. Stan Swiney of the 911 center says the call reportedly
came from a Billy Hanson. (No Billy Hanson listed in the Columbus
telephone directory was involved; I called.)
The 911 report said someone saw the alleged corpse through a window.
That's difficult: The room's dark; the window's dirty; the art's hard
to see.
The artist, Dan Barfield, says it's funny Danny W**** would be
frightened, because the real estate agent stopped by a few months ago
when Dan was moving art into the house, and this piece was out on the
lawn at the time. The artist claims the agent told him a decayed body
was found in the house once.
Danny says that's outrageous: He has never met Dan Barfield. ``I would
remember that,'' he says.
Danny says he just wanted to buy the house to help clean up the
neighborhood, where he owns other property. ``As far as I'm concerned
now, they couldn't give it to me,'' he says.
Perhaps it will remain the house of scary art, where once people
thought they saw a dead body.
But didn't.
-------------------------------
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/alt.arts.poetry.comments/SAYiwgoSyJE/9w0GYQ4gBBcJ
You weren’t interviewed
Yes I was, I was the person who met Chitwood and the photographer at the house, and the article included a color photo of me holding one of Dan Barfield's paintings.
Well, GOLL-EEEEEE!
A big Jim Nabors fan, are you?

https://issuu.com/willdockery/docs
ME
2019-12-05 22:35:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by ME
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Edward Rochester Esq.
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
any publicity is good publicity
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/alt.arts.poetry.comments/SAYiwgoSyJE/9w0GYQ4gBBcJ
---------------------
Columbus Ledger-Enquirer (GA)
July 13, 1997
Section: LOCAL
Edition: FIRST
Page: B1
HOW GROSS THY ART
Tim Chitwood
Apparently it was all just a big misunderstanding.
The misunderstanding led to a 911 call about a decomposing body in an
old house M***** S*****'s husband R****** owns at 2113 **th St. in
Columbus. That led to the discovery that it wasn't a body after all,
but artwork made of barbed wire and blowtorched Barbie dolls.
But it sure looked like a body to police. And it looked like a body to
paramedics. And it definitely looked like a body to Danny W****.
Danny is a real estate agent who with M***** went to look at the house
July 2. He wanted to buy it and fix it up. It needs fixing up. The
roof leaks in places and some of the floor's rotting. The S**** now
live on F**** Drive and use the **th Street house for storage.
M*****'s son Will Dockery lets friends -- artists, poets and madmen,
Will says -- store their work there.
Among those artists is Dan Barfield, who has a concept piece called
``Vietnam,'' part of which the veteran made of melted Barbie dolls.
(``He hates Barbies,'' says his wife Judy.) It now lies on the floor
among other stuff stored in the dark, northwest bedroom of the ##th
Street house. To someone who didn't know what it was, it might look
like a rib cage and sternum atop decayed matter.
That's what it looked like to Danny W**** when he walked into that
musty room, first staring up at the rafters. Then he looked down. Then
he froze. Then he ran.
He wasn't sure what he saw. Maybe a body. Maybe it was sealed with
wax, which trapped the odor. Maybe this was a bizarre ritual. Maybe he
didn't want to know.
M***** followed Danny as he dashed outside, where he tried to make a
call on his cell phone. She told him not to. According to her, she
told him he'd just seen some artwork. According to Danny, she never
said that; she just said they didn't need the police coming there.
This did not sound reassuring. Danny had to make that call. Now don't
call the police, M***** said again. She says she also told Danny her
son Will had a bad temper, and he wouldn't like Danny calling the
police.
She says Danny replied that the police wouldn't do anything to her;
she wasn't involved. That's true, she said (she wasn't involved in
storing the art), but the police needn't be bothered.
M***** claims Danny then offered her $13,000 for the house, then said
it needed so much work the most he could give her was $10,000.
Danny maintains all M***** did was tell him no one should call the
police.
The next day, someone called the police.
About 10:30 a.m., police and paramedics rushed to the house, unboarded
a door to get in and examined what they, too, thought was a decaying
body, oddly odorless. Then they poked it and figured out it wasn't. It
was such a weird story, the Ledger-Enquirer ran it on the front page
July 4.
That's how M****** learned police had broken into the house. She was
perturbed. She blamed Danny.
Danny won't say he called police, but admits he told someone what he
thought he saw. Stan Swiney of the 911 center says the call reportedly
came from a Billy Hanson. (No Billy Hanson listed in the Columbus
telephone directory was involved; I called.)
The 911 report said someone saw the alleged corpse through a window.
That's difficult: The room's dark; the window's dirty; the art's hard
to see.
The artist, Dan Barfield, says it's funny Danny W**** would be
frightened, because the real estate agent stopped by a few months ago
when Dan was moving art into the house, and this piece was out on the
lawn at the time. The artist claims the agent told him a decayed body
was found in the house once.
Danny says that's outrageous: He has never met Dan Barfield. ``I would
remember that,'' he says.
Danny says he just wanted to buy the house to help clean up the
neighborhood, where he owns other property. ``As far as I'm concerned
now, they couldn't give it to me,'' he says.
Perhaps it will remain the house of scary art, where once people
thought they saw a dead body.
But didn't.
-------------------------------
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/alt.arts.poetry.comments/SAYiwgoSyJE/9w0GYQ4gBBcJ
You weren’t interviewed
Yes I was, I was the person who met Chitwood and the photographer at the house, and the article included a color photo of me holding one of Dan Barfield's paintings.
You are evidently the only one who remembers your meeting.
ME
2019-12-05 22:48:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by ME
Post by Will Dockery
Post by ME
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Edward Rochester Esq.
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
any publicity is good publicity
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/alt.arts.poetry.comments/SAYiwgoSyJE/9w0GYQ4gBBcJ
---------------------
Columbus Ledger-Enquirer (GA)
July 13, 1997
Section: LOCAL
Edition: FIRST
Page: B1
HOW GROSS THY ART
Tim Chitwood
Apparently it was all just a big misunderstanding.
The misunderstanding led to a 911 call about a decomposing body in an
old house M***** S*****'s husband R****** owns at 2113 **th St. in
Columbus. That led to the discovery that it wasn't a body after all,
but artwork made of barbed wire and blowtorched Barbie dolls.
But it sure looked like a body to police. And it looked like a body to
paramedics. And it definitely looked like a body to Danny W****.
Danny is a real estate agent who with M***** went to look at the house
July 2. He wanted to buy it and fix it up. It needs fixing up. The
roof leaks in places and some of the floor's rotting. The S**** now
live on F**** Drive and use the **th Street house for storage.
M*****'s son Will Dockery lets friends -- artists, poets and madmen,
Will says -- store their work there.
Among those artists is Dan Barfield, who has a concept piece called
``Vietnam,'' part of which the veteran made of melted Barbie dolls.
(``He hates Barbies,'' says his wife Judy.) It now lies on the floor
among other stuff stored in the dark, northwest bedroom of the ##th
Street house. To someone who didn't know what it was, it might look
like a rib cage and sternum atop decayed matter.
That's what it looked like to Danny W**** when he walked into that
musty room, first staring up at the rafters. Then he looked down. Then
he froze. Then he ran.
He wasn't sure what he saw. Maybe a body. Maybe it was sealed with
wax, which trapped the odor. Maybe this was a bizarre ritual. Maybe he
didn't want to know.
M***** followed Danny as he dashed outside, where he tried to make a
call on his cell phone. She told him not to. According to her, she
told him he'd just seen some artwork. According to Danny, she never
said that; she just said they didn't need the police coming there.
This did not sound reassuring. Danny had to make that call. Now don't
call the police, M***** said again. She says she also told Danny her
son Will had a bad temper, and he wouldn't like Danny calling the
police.
She says Danny replied that the police wouldn't do anything to her;
she wasn't involved. That's true, she said (she wasn't involved in
storing the art), but the police needn't be bothered.
M***** claims Danny then offered her $13,000 for the house, then said
it needed so much work the most he could give her was $10,000.
Danny maintains all M***** did was tell him no one should call the
police.
The next day, someone called the police.
About 10:30 a.m., police and paramedics rushed to the house, unboarded
a door to get in and examined what they, too, thought was a decaying
body, oddly odorless. Then they poked it and figured out it wasn't. It
was such a weird story, the Ledger-Enquirer ran it on the front page
July 4.
That's how M****** learned police had broken into the house. She was
perturbed. She blamed Danny.
Danny won't say he called police, but admits he told someone what he
thought he saw. Stan Swiney of the 911 center says the call reportedly
came from a Billy Hanson. (No Billy Hanson listed in the Columbus
telephone directory was involved; I called.)
The 911 report said someone saw the alleged corpse through a window.
That's difficult: The room's dark; the window's dirty; the art's hard
to see.
The artist, Dan Barfield, says it's funny Danny W**** would be
frightened, because the real estate agent stopped by a few months ago
when Dan was moving art into the house, and this piece was out on the
lawn at the time. The artist claims the agent told him a decayed body
was found in the house once.
Danny says that's outrageous: He has never met Dan Barfield. ``I would
remember that,'' he says.
Danny says he just wanted to buy the house to help clean up the
neighborhood, where he owns other property. ``As far as I'm concerned
now, they couldn't give it to me,'' he says.
Perhaps it will remain the house of scary art, where once people
thought they saw a dead body.
But didn't.
-------------------------------
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/alt.arts.poetry.comments/SAYiwgoSyJE/9w0GYQ4gBBcJ
You weren’t interviewed
Yes I was, I was the person who met Chitwood and the photographer at the house, and the article included a color photo of me holding one of Dan Barfield's paintings.
You are evidently the only one who remembers your meeting.
BTW. Did you drop off a copy of your chapbook at the Ledger for the lifestyle reporter?
General Zod
2019-12-05 23:59:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by ME
Post by Will Dockery
Post by ME
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Edward Rochester Esq.
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
any publicity is good publicity
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/alt.arts.poetry.comments/SAYiwgoSyJE/9w0GYQ4gBBcJ
---------------------
Columbus Ledger-Enquirer (GA)
July 13, 1997
Section: LOCAL
Edition: FIRST
Page: B1
HOW GROSS THY ART
Tim Chitwood
Apparently it was all just a big misunderstanding.
The misunderstanding led to a 911 call about a decomposing body in an
old house M***** S*****'s husband R****** owns at 2113 **th St. in
Columbus. That led to the discovery that it wasn't a body after all,
but artwork made of barbed wire and blowtorched Barbie dolls.
But it sure looked like a body to police. And it looked like a body to
paramedics. And it definitely looked like a body to Danny W****.
Danny is a real estate agent who with M***** went to look at the house
July 2. He wanted to buy it and fix it up. It needs fixing up. The
roof leaks in places and some of the floor's rotting. The S**** now
live on F**** Drive and use the **th Street house for storage.
M*****'s son Will Dockery lets friends -- artists, poets and madmen,
Will says -- store their work there.
Among those artists is Dan Barfield, who has a concept piece called
``Vietnam,'' part of which the veteran made of melted Barbie dolls.
(``He hates Barbies,'' says his wife Judy.) It now lies on the floor
among other stuff stored in the dark, northwest bedroom of the ##th
Street house. To someone who didn't know what it was, it might look
like a rib cage and sternum atop decayed matter.
That's what it looked like to Danny W**** when he walked into that
musty room, first staring up at the rafters. Then he looked down. Then
he froze. Then he ran.
He wasn't sure what he saw. Maybe a body. Maybe it was sealed with
wax, which trapped the odor. Maybe this was a bizarre ritual. Maybe he
didn't want to know.
M***** followed Danny as he dashed outside, where he tried to make a
call on his cell phone. She told him not to. According to her, she
told him he'd just seen some artwork. According to Danny, she never
said that; she just said they didn't need the police coming there.
This did not sound reassuring. Danny had to make that call. Now don't
call the police, M***** said again. She says she also told Danny her
son Will had a bad temper, and he wouldn't like Danny calling the
police.
She says Danny replied that the police wouldn't do anything to her;
she wasn't involved. That's true, she said (she wasn't involved in
storing the art), but the police needn't be bothered.
M***** claims Danny then offered her $13,000 for the house, then said
it needed so much work the most he could give her was $10,000.
Danny maintains all M***** did was tell him no one should call the
police.
The next day, someone called the police.
About 10:30 a.m., police and paramedics rushed to the house, unboarded
a door to get in and examined what they, too, thought was a decaying
body, oddly odorless. Then they poked it and figured out it wasn't. It
was such a weird story, the Ledger-Enquirer ran it on the front page
July 4.
That's how M****** learned police had broken into the house. She was
perturbed. She blamed Danny.
Danny won't say he called police, but admits he told someone what he
thought he saw. Stan Swiney of the 911 center says the call reportedly
came from a Billy Hanson. (No Billy Hanson listed in the Columbus
telephone directory was involved; I called.)
The 911 report said someone saw the alleged corpse through a window.
That's difficult: The room's dark; the window's dirty; the art's hard
to see.
The artist, Dan Barfield, says it's funny Danny W**** would be
frightened, because the real estate agent stopped by a few months ago
when Dan was moving art into the house, and this piece was out on the
lawn at the time. The artist claims the agent told him a decayed body
was found in the house once.
Danny says that's outrageous: He has never met Dan Barfield. ``I would
remember that,'' he says.
Danny says he just wanted to buy the house to help clean up the
neighborhood, where he owns other property. ``As far as I'm concerned
now, they couldn't give it to me,'' he says.
Perhaps it will remain the house of scary art, where once people
thought they saw a dead body.
But didn't.
-------------------------------
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/alt.arts.poetry.comments/SAYiwgoSyJE/9w0GYQ4gBBcJ
You weren’t interviewed
Yes I was, I was the person who met Chitwood and the photographer at the house, and the article included a color photo of me holding one of Dan Barfield's paintings.
BTW. Did you drop off a copy of your chapbook at the Ledger for the lifestyle reporter?
Wow, could you ever get more nosy than you already are, my smarmy little toad....?

Ha ha ha.....
ME
2019-12-06 00:03:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by General Zod
Post by ME
Post by Will Dockery
Post by ME
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Edward Rochester Esq.
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
any publicity is good publicity
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/alt.arts.poetry.comments/SAYiwgoSyJE/9w0GYQ4gBBcJ
---------------------
Columbus Ledger-Enquirer (GA)
July 13, 1997
Section: LOCAL
Edition: FIRST
Page: B1
HOW GROSS THY ART
Tim Chitwood
Apparently it was all just a big misunderstanding.
The misunderstanding led to a 911 call about a decomposing body in an
old house M***** S*****'s husband R****** owns at 2113 **th St. in
Columbus. That led to the discovery that it wasn't a body after all,
but artwork made of barbed wire and blowtorched Barbie dolls.
But it sure looked like a body to police. And it looked like a body to
paramedics. And it definitely looked like a body to Danny W****.
Danny is a real estate agent who with M***** went to look at the house
July 2. He wanted to buy it and fix it up. It needs fixing up. The
roof leaks in places and some of the floor's rotting. The S**** now
live on F**** Drive and use the **th Street house for storage.
M*****'s son Will Dockery lets friends -- artists, poets and madmen,
Will says -- store their work there.
Among those artists is Dan Barfield, who has a concept piece called
``Vietnam,'' part of which the veteran made of melted Barbie dolls.
(``He hates Barbies,'' says his wife Judy.) It now lies on the floor
among other stuff stored in the dark, northwest bedroom of the ##th
Street house. To someone who didn't know what it was, it might look
like a rib cage and sternum atop decayed matter.
That's what it looked like to Danny W**** when he walked into that
musty room, first staring up at the rafters. Then he looked down. Then
he froze. Then he ran.
He wasn't sure what he saw. Maybe a body. Maybe it was sealed with
wax, which trapped the odor. Maybe this was a bizarre ritual. Maybe he
didn't want to know.
M***** followed Danny as he dashed outside, where he tried to make a
call on his cell phone. She told him not to. According to her, she
told him he'd just seen some artwork. According to Danny, she never
said that; she just said they didn't need the police coming there.
This did not sound reassuring. Danny had to make that call. Now don't
call the police, M***** said again. She says she also told Danny her
son Will had a bad temper, and he wouldn't like Danny calling the
police.
She says Danny replied that the police wouldn't do anything to her;
she wasn't involved. That's true, she said (she wasn't involved in
storing the art), but the police needn't be bothered.
M***** claims Danny then offered her $13,000 for the house, then said
it needed so much work the most he could give her was $10,000.
Danny maintains all M***** did was tell him no one should call the
police.
The next day, someone called the police.
About 10:30 a.m., police and paramedics rushed to the house, unboarded
a door to get in and examined what they, too, thought was a decaying
body, oddly odorless. Then they poked it and figured out it wasn't. It
was such a weird story, the Ledger-Enquirer ran it on the front page
July 4.
That's how M****** learned police had broken into the house. She was
perturbed. She blamed Danny.
Danny won't say he called police, but admits he told someone what he
thought he saw. Stan Swiney of the 911 center says the call reportedly
came from a Billy Hanson. (No Billy Hanson listed in the Columbus
telephone directory was involved; I called.)
The 911 report said someone saw the alleged corpse through a window.
That's difficult: The room's dark; the window's dirty; the art's hard
to see.
The artist, Dan Barfield, says it's funny Danny W**** would be
frightened, because the real estate agent stopped by a few months ago
when Dan was moving art into the house, and this piece was out on the
lawn at the time. The artist claims the agent told him a decayed body
was found in the house once.
Danny says that's outrageous: He has never met Dan Barfield. ``I would
remember that,'' he says.
Danny says he just wanted to buy the house to help clean up the
neighborhood, where he owns other property. ``As far as I'm concerned
now, they couldn't give it to me,'' he says.
Perhaps it will remain the house of scary art, where once people
thought they saw a dead body.
But didn't.
-------------------------------
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/alt.arts.poetry.comments/SAYiwgoSyJE/9w0GYQ4gBBcJ
You weren’t interviewed
Yes I was, I was the person who met Chitwood and the photographer at the house, and the article included a color photo of me holding one of Dan Barfield's paintings.
BTW. Did you drop off a copy of your chapbook at the Ledger for the lifestyle reporter?
Wow, could you ever get more nosy than you already are, my smarmy little toad....?
Ha ha ha.....
Do you have a new book to advertise at the newspaper also, zid?
General Zod
2019-12-06 00:10:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
Post by ME
Post by General Zod
Post by ME
Post by Will Dockery
Post by ME
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Edward Rochester Esq.
any publicity is good publicity
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/alt.arts.poetry.comments/SAYiwgoSyJE/9w0GYQ4gBBcJ
---------------------
Columbus Ledger-Enquirer (GA)
July 13, 1997
Section: LOCAL
Edition: FIRST
Page: B1
HOW GROSS THY ART
Tim Chitwood
Apparently it was all just a big misunderstanding.
The misunderstanding led to a 911 call about a decomposing body in an
old house M***** S*****'s husband R****** owns at 2113 **th St. in
Columbus. That led to the discovery that it wasn't a body after all,
but artwork made of barbed wire and blowtorched Barbie dolls.
But it sure looked like a body to police. And it looked like a body to
paramedics. And it definitely looked like a body to Danny W****.
Danny is a real estate agent who with M***** went to look at the house
July 2. He wanted to buy it and fix it up. It needs fixing up. The
roof leaks in places and some of the floor's rotting. The S**** now
live on F**** Drive and use the **th Street house for storage.
M*****'s son Will Dockery lets friends -- artists, poets and madmen,
Will says -- store their work there.
Among those artists is Dan Barfield, who has a concept piece called
``Vietnam,'' part of which the veteran made of melted Barbie dolls.
(``He hates Barbies,'' says his wife Judy.) It now lies on the floor
among other stuff stored in the dark, northwest bedroom of the ##th
Street house. To someone who didn't know what it was, it might look
like a rib cage and sternum atop decayed matter.
That's what it looked like to Danny W**** when he walked into that
musty room, first staring up at the rafters. Then he looked down. Then
he froze. Then he ran.
He wasn't sure what he saw. Maybe a body. Maybe it was sealed with
wax, which trapped the odor. Maybe this was a bizarre ritual. Maybe he
didn't want to know.
M***** followed Danny as he dashed outside, where he tried to make a
call on his cell phone. She told him not to. According to her, she
told him he'd just seen some artwork. According to Danny, she never
said that; she just said they didn't need the police coming there.
This did not sound reassuring. Danny had to make that call. Now don't
call the police, M***** said again. She says she also told Danny her
son Will had a bad temper, and he wouldn't like Danny calling the
police.
She says Danny replied that the police wouldn't do anything to her;
she wasn't involved. That's true, she said (she wasn't involved in
storing the art), but the police needn't be bothered.
M***** claims Danny then offered her $13,000 for the house, then said
it needed so much work the most he could give her was $10,000.
Danny maintains all M***** did was tell him no one should call the
police.
The next day, someone called the police.
About 10:30 a.m., police and paramedics rushed to the house, unboarded
a door to get in and examined what they, too, thought was a decaying
body, oddly odorless. Then they poked it and figured out it wasn't. It
was such a weird story, the Ledger-Enquirer ran it on the front page
July 4.
That's how M****** learned police had broken into the house. She was
perturbed. She blamed Danny.
Danny won't say he called police, but admits he told someone what he
thought he saw. Stan Swiney of the 911 center says the call reportedly
came from a Billy Hanson. (No Billy Hanson listed in the Columbus
telephone directory was involved; I called.)
The 911 report said someone saw the alleged corpse through a window.
That's difficult: The room's dark; the window's dirty; the art's hard
to see.
The artist, Dan Barfield, says it's funny Danny W**** would be
frightened, because the real estate agent stopped by a few months ago
when Dan was moving art into the house, and this piece was out on the
lawn at the time. The artist claims the agent told him a decayed body
was found in the house once.
Danny says that's outrageous: He has never met Dan Barfield. ``I would
remember that,'' he says.
Danny says he just wanted to buy the house to help clean up the
neighborhood, where he owns other property. ``As far as I'm concerned
now, they couldn't give it to me,'' he says.
Perhaps it will remain the house of scary art, where once people
thought they saw a dead body.
But didn't.
-------------------------------
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/alt.arts.poetry.comments/SAYiwgoSyJE/9w0GYQ4gBBcJ
You weren’t interviewed
Yes I was, I was the person who met Chitwood and the photographer at the house, and the article included a color photo of me holding one of Dan Barfield's paintings.
BTW. Did you drop off a copy of your chapbook at the Ledger for the lifestyle reporter?
Wow, could you ever get more nosy than you already are, my smarmy little toad....?
Ha ha ha.....
Do you have a new book to advertise
The proper word would be to promote, not advertise......

Just saying......
ME
2019-12-06 00:11:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
Post by ME
Post by General Zod
Post by ME
Post by Will Dockery
Post by ME
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Edward Rochester Esq.
any publicity is good publicity
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/alt.arts.poetry.comments/SAYiwgoSyJE/9w0GYQ4gBBcJ
---------------------
Columbus Ledger-Enquirer (GA)
July 13, 1997
Section: LOCAL
Edition: FIRST
Page: B1
HOW GROSS THY ART
Tim Chitwood
Apparently it was all just a big misunderstanding.
The misunderstanding led to a 911 call about a decomposing body in an
old house M***** S*****'s husband R****** owns at 2113 **th St. in
Columbus. That led to the discovery that it wasn't a body after all,
but artwork made of barbed wire and blowtorched Barbie dolls.
But it sure looked like a body to police. And it looked like a body to
paramedics. And it definitely looked like a body to Danny W****.
Danny is a real estate agent who with M***** went to look at the house
July 2. He wanted to buy it and fix it up. It needs fixing up. The
roof leaks in places and some of the floor's rotting. The S**** now
live on F**** Drive and use the **th Street house for storage.
M*****'s son Will Dockery lets friends -- artists, poets and madmen,
Will says -- store their work there.
Among those artists is Dan Barfield, who has a concept piece called
``Vietnam,'' part of which the veteran made of melted Barbie dolls.
(``He hates Barbies,'' says his wife Judy.) It now lies on the floor
among other stuff stored in the dark, northwest bedroom of the ##th
Street house. To someone who didn't know what it was, it might look
like a rib cage and sternum atop decayed matter.
That's what it looked like to Danny W**** when he walked into that
musty room, first staring up at the rafters. Then he looked down. Then
he froze. Then he ran.
He wasn't sure what he saw. Maybe a body. Maybe it was sealed with
wax, which trapped the odor. Maybe this was a bizarre ritual. Maybe he
didn't want to know.
M***** followed Danny as he dashed outside, where he tried to make a
call on his cell phone. She told him not to. According to her, she
told him he'd just seen some artwork. According to Danny, she never
said that; she just said they didn't need the police coming there.
This did not sound reassuring. Danny had to make that call. Now don't
call the police, M***** said again. She says she also told Danny her
son Will had a bad temper, and he wouldn't like Danny calling the
police.
She says Danny replied that the police wouldn't do anything to her;
she wasn't involved. That's true, she said (she wasn't involved in
storing the art), but the police needn't be bothered.
M***** claims Danny then offered her $13,000 for the house, then said
it needed so much work the most he could give her was $10,000.
Danny maintains all M***** did was tell him no one should call the
police.
The next day, someone called the police.
About 10:30 a.m., police and paramedics rushed to the house, unboarded
a door to get in and examined what they, too, thought was a decaying
body, oddly odorless. Then they poked it and figured out it wasn't. It
was such a weird story, the Ledger-Enquirer ran it on the front page
July 4.
That's how M****** learned police had broken into the house. She was
perturbed. She blamed Danny.
Danny won't say he called police, but admits he told someone what he
thought he saw. Stan Swiney of the 911 center says the call reportedly
came from a Billy Hanson. (No Billy Hanson listed in the Columbus
telephone directory was involved; I called.)
The 911 report said someone saw the alleged corpse through a window.
That's difficult: The room's dark; the window's dirty; the art's hard
to see.
The artist, Dan Barfield, says it's funny Danny W**** would be
frightened, because the real estate agent stopped by a few months ago
when Dan was moving art into the house, and this piece was out on the
lawn at the time. The artist claims the agent told him a decayed body
was found in the house once.
Danny says that's outrageous: He has never met Dan Barfield. ``I would
remember that,'' he says.
Danny says he just wanted to buy the house to help clean up the
neighborhood, where he owns other property. ``As far as I'm concerned
now, they couldn't give it to me,'' he says.
Perhaps it will remain the house of scary art, where once people
thought they saw a dead body.
But didn't.
-------------------------------
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/alt.arts.poetry.comments/SAYiwgoSyJE/9w0GYQ4gBBcJ
You weren’t interviewed
Yes I was, I was the person who met Chitwood and the photographer at the house, and the article included a color photo of me holding one of Dan Barfield's paintings.
BTW. Did you drop off a copy of your chapbook at the Ledger for the lifestyle reporter?
Wow, could you ever get more nosy than you already are, my smarmy little toad....?
Ha ha ha.....
Do you have a new book to advertise
The proper word would be to promote, not advertise......
Just saying......
Sorry will. My bad!!
General Zod
2019-12-06 00:12:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
Post by ME
Post by General Zod
Post by ME
Post by Will Dockery
Post by ME
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Edward Rochester Esq.
any publicity is good publicity
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/alt.arts.poetry.comments/SAYiwgoSyJE/9w0GYQ4gBBcJ
---------------------
Columbus Ledger-Enquirer (GA)
July 13, 1997
Section: LOCAL
Edition: FIRST
Page: B1
HOW GROSS THY ART
Tim Chitwood
Apparently it was all just a big misunderstanding.
The misunderstanding led to a 911 call about a decomposing body in an
old house M***** S*****'s husband R****** owns at 2113 **th St. in
Columbus. That led to the discovery that it wasn't a body after all,
but artwork made of barbed wire and blowtorched Barbie dolls.
But it sure looked like a body to police. And it looked like a body to
paramedics. And it definitely looked like a body to Danny W****.
Danny is a real estate agent who with M***** went to look at the house
July 2. He wanted to buy it and fix it up. It needs fixing up. The
roof leaks in places and some of the floor's rotting. The S**** now
live on F**** Drive and use the **th Street house for storage.
M*****'s son Will Dockery lets friends -- artists, poets and madmen,
Will says -- store their work there.
Among those artists is Dan Barfield, who has a concept piece called
``Vietnam,'' part of which the veteran made of melted Barbie dolls.
(``He hates Barbies,'' says his wife Judy.) It now lies on the floor
among other stuff stored in the dark, northwest bedroom of the ##th
Street house. To someone who didn't know what it was, it might look
like a rib cage and sternum atop decayed matter.
That's what it looked like to Danny W**** when he walked into that
musty room, first staring up at the rafters. Then he looked down. Then
he froze. Then he ran.
He wasn't sure what he saw. Maybe a body. Maybe it was sealed with
wax, which trapped the odor. Maybe this was a bizarre ritual. Maybe he
didn't want to know.
M***** followed Danny as he dashed outside, where he tried to make a
call on his cell phone. She told him not to. According to her, she
told him he'd just seen some artwork. According to Danny, she never
said that; she just said they didn't need the police coming there.
This did not sound reassuring. Danny had to make that call. Now don't
call the police, M***** said again. She says she also told Danny her
son Will had a bad temper, and he wouldn't like Danny calling the
police.
She says Danny replied that the police wouldn't do anything to her;
she wasn't involved. That's true, she said (she wasn't involved in
storing the art), but the police needn't be bothered.
M***** claims Danny then offered her $13,000 for the house, then said
it needed so much work the most he could give her was $10,000.
Danny maintains all M***** did was tell him no one should call the
police.
The next day, someone called the police.
About 10:30 a.m., police and paramedics rushed to the house, unboarded
a door to get in and examined what they, too, thought was a decaying
body, oddly odorless. Then they poked it and figured out it wasn't. It
was such a weird story, the Ledger-Enquirer ran it on the front page
July 4.
That's how M****** learned police had broken into the house. She was
perturbed. She blamed Danny.
Danny won't say he called police, but admits he told someone what he
thought he saw. Stan Swiney of the 911 center says the call reportedly
came from a Billy Hanson. (No Billy Hanson listed in the Columbus
telephone directory was involved; I called.)
The 911 report said someone saw the alleged corpse through a window.
That's difficult: The room's dark; the window's dirty; the art's hard
to see.
The artist, Dan Barfield, says it's funny Danny W**** would be
frightened, because the real estate agent stopped by a few months ago
when Dan was moving art into the house, and this piece was out on the
lawn at the time. The artist claims the agent told him a decayed body
was found in the house once.
Danny says that's outrageous: He has never met Dan Barfield. ``I would
remember that,'' he says.
Danny says he just wanted to buy the house to help clean up the
neighborhood, where he owns other property. ``As far as I'm concerned
now, they couldn't give it to me,'' he says.
Perhaps it will remain the house of scary art, where once people
thought they saw a dead body.
But didn't.
-------------------------------
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/alt.arts.poetry.comments/SAYiwgoSyJE/9w0GYQ4gBBcJ
You weren’t interviewed
Yes I was, I was the person who met Chitwood and the photographer at the house, and the article included a color photo of me holding one of Dan Barfield's paintings.
BTW. Did you drop off a copy of your chapbook at the Ledger for the lifestyle reporter?
Wow, could you ever get more nosy than you already are, my smarmy little toad....?
Ha ha ha.....
Do you have a new book to advertise
The proper word would be to promote, not advertise......
Just saying......
Sorry
You seem confused again tonight......!!
ME
2019-12-06 00:13:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by General Zod
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
Post by ME
Post by General Zod
Post by ME
Post by Will Dockery
Post by ME
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Edward Rochester Esq.
any publicity is good publicity
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/alt.arts.poetry.comments/SAYiwgoSyJE/9w0GYQ4gBBcJ
---------------------
Columbus Ledger-Enquirer (GA)
July 13, 1997
Section: LOCAL
Edition: FIRST
Page: B1
HOW GROSS THY ART
Tim Chitwood
Apparently it was all just a big misunderstanding.
The misunderstanding led to a 911 call about a decomposing body in an
old house M***** S*****'s husband R****** owns at 2113 **th St. in
Columbus. That led to the discovery that it wasn't a body after all,
but artwork made of barbed wire and blowtorched Barbie dolls.
But it sure looked like a body to police. And it looked like a body to
paramedics. And it definitely looked like a body to Danny W****.
Danny is a real estate agent who with M***** went to look at the house
July 2. He wanted to buy it and fix it up. It needs fixing up. The
roof leaks in places and some of the floor's rotting. The S**** now
live on F**** Drive and use the **th Street house for storage.
M*****'s son Will Dockery lets friends -- artists, poets and madmen,
Will says -- store their work there.
Among those artists is Dan Barfield, who has a concept piece called
``Vietnam,'' part of which the veteran made of melted Barbie dolls.
(``He hates Barbies,'' says his wife Judy.) It now lies on the floor
among other stuff stored in the dark, northwest bedroom of the ##th
Street house. To someone who didn't know what it was, it might look
like a rib cage and sternum atop decayed matter.
That's what it looked like to Danny W**** when he walked into that
musty room, first staring up at the rafters. Then he looked down. Then
he froze. Then he ran.
He wasn't sure what he saw. Maybe a body. Maybe it was sealed with
wax, which trapped the odor. Maybe this was a bizarre ritual. Maybe he
didn't want to know.
M***** followed Danny as he dashed outside, where he tried to make a
call on his cell phone. She told him not to. According to her, she
told him he'd just seen some artwork. According to Danny, she never
said that; she just said they didn't need the police coming there.
This did not sound reassuring. Danny had to make that call. Now don't
call the police, M***** said again. She says she also told Danny her
son Will had a bad temper, and he wouldn't like Danny calling the
police.
She says Danny replied that the police wouldn't do anything to her;
she wasn't involved. That's true, she said (she wasn't involved in
storing the art), but the police needn't be bothered.
M***** claims Danny then offered her $13,000 for the house, then said
it needed so much work the most he could give her was $10,000.
Danny maintains all M***** did was tell him no one should call the
police.
The next day, someone called the police.
About 10:30 a.m., police and paramedics rushed to the house, unboarded
a door to get in and examined what they, too, thought was a decaying
body, oddly odorless. Then they poked it and figured out it wasn't. It
was such a weird story, the Ledger-Enquirer ran it on the front page
July 4.
That's how M****** learned police had broken into the house. She was
perturbed. She blamed Danny.
Danny won't say he called police, but admits he told someone what he
thought he saw. Stan Swiney of the 911 center says the call reportedly
came from a Billy Hanson. (No Billy Hanson listed in the Columbus
telephone directory was involved; I called.)
The 911 report said someone saw the alleged corpse through a window.
That's difficult: The room's dark; the window's dirty; the art's hard
to see.
The artist, Dan Barfield, says it's funny Danny W**** would be
frightened, because the real estate agent stopped by a few months ago
when Dan was moving art into the house, and this piece was out on the
lawn at the time. The artist claims the agent told him a decayed body
was found in the house once.
Danny says that's outrageous: He has never met Dan Barfield. ``I would
remember that,'' he says.
Danny says he just wanted to buy the house to help clean up the
neighborhood, where he owns other property. ``As far as I'm concerned
now, they couldn't give it to me,'' he says.
Perhaps it will remain the house of scary art, where once people
thought they saw a dead body.
But didn't.
-------------------------------
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/alt.arts.poetry.comments/SAYiwgoSyJE/9w0GYQ4gBBcJ
You weren’t interviewed
Yes I was, I was the person who met Chitwood and the photographer at the house, and the article included a color photo of me holding one of Dan Barfield's paintings.
BTW. Did you drop off a copy of your chapbook at the Ledger for the lifestyle reporter?
Wow, could you ever get more nosy than you already are, my smarmy little toad....?
Ha ha ha.....
Do you have a new book to advertise
The proper word would be to promote, not advertise......
Just saying......
Sorry
You seem confused again tonight......!!
No will. That’s just your upper lip.
General Zod
2019-12-06 00:18:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
Post by ME
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Edward Rochester Esq.
any publicity is good publicity
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/alt.arts.poetry.comments/SAYiwgoSyJE/9w0GYQ4gBBcJ
---------------------
Columbus Ledger-Enquirer (GA)
July 13, 1997
Section: LOCAL
Edition: FIRST
Page: B1
HOW GROSS THY ART
Tim Chitwood
Apparently it was all just a big misunderstanding.
The misunderstanding led to a 911 call about a decomposing body in an
old house M***** S*****'s husband R****** owns at 2113 **th St. in
Columbus. That led to the discovery that it wasn't a body after all,
but artwork made of barbed wire and blowtorched Barbie dolls.
But it sure looked like a body to police. And it looked like a body to
paramedics. And it definitely looked like a body to Danny W****.
Danny is a real estate agent who with M***** went to look at the house
July 2. He wanted to buy it and fix it up. It needs fixing up. The
roof leaks in places and some of the floor's rotting. The S**** now
live on F**** Drive and use the **th Street house for storage.
M*****'s son Will Dockery lets friends -- artists, poets and madmen,
Will says -- store their work there.
Among those artists is Dan Barfield, who has a concept piece called
``Vietnam,'' part of which the veteran made of melted Barbie dolls.
(``He hates Barbies,'' says his wife Judy.) It now lies on the floor
among other stuff stored in the dark, northwest bedroom of the ##th
Street house. To someone who didn't know what it was, it might look
like a rib cage and sternum atop decayed matter.
That's what it looked like to Danny W**** when he walked into that
musty room, first staring up at the rafters. Then he looked down. Then
he froze. Then he ran.
He wasn't sure what he saw. Maybe a body. Maybe it was sealed with
wax, which trapped the odor. Maybe this was a bizarre ritual. Maybe he
didn't want to know.
M***** followed Danny as he dashed outside, where he tried to make a
call on his cell phone. She told him not to. According to her, she
told him he'd just seen some artwork. According to Danny, she never
said that; she just said they didn't need the police coming there.
This did not sound reassuring. Danny had to make that call. Now don't
call the police, M***** said again. She says she also told Danny her
son Will had a bad temper, and he wouldn't like Danny calling the
police.
She says Danny replied that the police wouldn't do anything to her;
she wasn't involved. That's true, she said (she wasn't involved in
storing the art), but the police needn't be bothered.
M***** claims Danny then offered her $13,000 for the house, then said
it needed so much work the most he could give her was $10,000.
Danny maintains all M***** did was tell him no one should call the
police.
The next day, someone called the police.
About 10:30 a.m., police and paramedics rushed to the house, unboarded
a door to get in and examined what they, too, thought was a decaying
body, oddly odorless. Then they poked it and figured out it wasn't. It
was such a weird story, the Ledger-Enquirer ran it on the front page
July 4.
That's how M****** learned police had broken into the house. She was
perturbed. She blamed Danny.
Danny won't say he called police, but admits he told someone what he
thought he saw. Stan Swiney of the 911 center says the call reportedly
came from a Billy Hanson. (No Billy Hanson listed in the Columbus
telephone directory was involved; I called.)
The 911 report said someone saw the alleged corpse through a window.
That's difficult: The room's dark; the window's dirty; the art's hard
to see.
The artist, Dan Barfield, says it's funny Danny W**** would be
frightened, because the real estate agent stopped by a few months ago
when Dan was moving art into the house, and this piece was out on the
lawn at the time. The artist claims the agent told him a decayed body
was found in the house once.
Danny says that's outrageous: He has never met Dan Barfield. ``I would
remember that,'' he says.
Danny says he just wanted to buy the house to help clean up the
neighborhood, where he owns other property. ``As far as I'm concerned
now, they couldn't give it to me,'' he says.
Perhaps it will remain the house of scary art, where once people
thought they saw a dead body.
But didn't.
-------------------------------
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/alt.arts.poetry.comments/SAYiwgoSyJE/9w0GYQ4gBBcJ
Post by ME
That’s just your upper lip
You must be smelling your own, as usual.....!!!
ME
2019-12-05 20:53:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
Post by ME
Post by General Zod
Post by Me
Also, sometimes, you just have to take it to real life.
For ME, it’s nothing more than a well placed phone call.
Your stalker mentality is well know here.......
It’s not stalking if y’all supply the information.
Calling people on the phone with a malicious intent is harassment, which is a definite stalker sign, not to mention a cyberbully tactic.
;)
I didn’t call you, stupid.
What the fuck are whining and crying about?
And you should be careful of the false accusations you sling around here. Those are actionable offenses.
Will Dockery
2019-12-05 20:59:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thursday, December 5, 2019 at 3:53:32 PM UTC-5, ME wrote:

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
Post by ME
I didn’t call you, stupid
You call other people about me, you've bragged about it.

Jeremy Hobbs refers to you as "that nutjob".

:D
ME
2019-12-05 21:13:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
Post by ME
I didn’t call you, stupid
You call other people about me, you've bragged about it.
Jeremy Hobbs refers to you as "that nutjob".
:D
I’ll contact Jeremy and let him know that you’re misrepresenting him again.
Maybe you shouldn’t share so much information here about your life, nut job.
And, once again, why are you spamming and bombarding this group with your paperback chapbook.
That’s what the media is for.
Will Dockery
2019-12-05 21:24:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by ME
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
Post by ME
I didn’t call you, stupid
You call other people about me, you've bragged about it.
Jeremy Hobbs refers to you as "that nutjob".
:D
I’ll contact Jeremy and let him know that you’re misrepresenting him again.
That's what Jeremy told me when I asked if you, my obsessed stalker, was still making the phone calls to him.

;)
General Zod
2019-12-02 10:24:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Nancy G.... must you always have to be so dour and negative...?
Z***@none.i2p
2019-12-02 10:49:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
NancyGene wrote on Sun, 01 December 2019 22:12
Post by NancyGene
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
tacky and cheesy
That's actally describes your own Mad Magazine crap poetry, Nancy G........!!
Me
2019-12-02 10:55:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Z***@none.i2p
NancyGene wrote on Sun, 01 December 2019 22:12
Post by NancyGene
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
tacky and cheesy
That's actally describes your own Mad Magazine crap poetry, Nancy G........!!
No, the majority of the people said it was in bad taste to rate your own book.
Z***@none.i2p
2019-12-02 10:57:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Me[9
Post by Z***@none.i2p
NancyGene wrote on Sun, 01 December 2019 22:12
Post by NancyGene
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
tacky and cheesy
That's actually describes your own Mad Magazine crap poetry, Nancy G........!!
No
Yes it is.....
Z***@none.i2p
2019-12-02 11:08:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Me[9
wrote on Mon, 02 December 2019 10:55]
bad taste
If you didn't kiss so much ass that bad taste might subside.........!!

Ha ha ha....
Conley Brothers
2019-12-03 13:27:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Z***@none.i2p
Me[9
wrote on Mon, 02 December 2019 10:55]
bad taste
If you didn't kiss so much ass that bad taste might subside.........!!
Ha ha ha....
Funny, considering you do nothing on here but kiss Dockery's crusty, morbidly obese ass on here in exchange for rides to the liquor store and crack runs.
Will Dockery
2019-12-03 19:19:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Conley Brothers
Funny, considering you do nothing on here but
And you do what besides pretend to be someone you're not, fake Conley?

;)
George J. Dance
2019-12-03 21:55:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Me
Post by Z***@none.i2p
NancyGene wrote on Sun, 01 December 2019 22:12
Post by NancyGene
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
tacky and cheesy
That's actally describes your own Mad Magazine crap poetry, Nancy G........!!
No, the majority of the people said it was in bad taste to rate your own book.
You didn't even read the comments, did you?
Michael Pendragon
2019-12-03 22:00:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Me
Post by Z***@none.i2p
NancyGene wrote on Sun, 01 December 2019 22:12
Post by NancyGene
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
tacky and cheesy
That's actally describes your own Mad Magazine crap poetry, Nancy G........!!
No, the majority of the people said it was in bad taste to rate your own book.
You didn't even read the comments, did you?
AFAICS NancyGene is the only one who left a comment.
George J. Dance
2019-12-03 22:14:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Me
Post by Z***@none.i2p
NancyGene wrote on Sun, 01 December 2019 22:12
Post by NancyGene
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
tacky and cheesy
That's actally describes your own Mad Magazine crap poetry, Nancy G........!!
No, the majority of the people said it was in bad taste to rate your own book.
You didn't even read the comments, did you?
AFAICS NancyGene is the only one who left a comment.
Sorry, I thought we were talking about the comments in that "Should Should You Rate Your Own Book?" thread in the authors' discussion group for which a link was posted. I haven't looked at Will's book page, and didn't realize it's had any action. I'll check that out tout suite.
Will Dockery
2019-12-03 22:39:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Michael Pendragon
AFAICS NancyGene is the only one who left a comment.
Sorry, I thought we were talking about the comments in that "Should Should You Rate Your Own Book?" thread in the authors' discussion group for which a link was posted. I haven't looked at Will's book page, and didn't realize it's had any action. I'll check that out tout suite.
Oh, there's now several negative reviews posted by the usual trolls, now... and Pendragon says Nancy G. was the only one who posted, so I suppose they are all by N.G. using fake names.

;)
George J. Dance
2019-12-03 23:06:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Michael Pendragon
AFAICS NancyGene is the only one who left a comment.
Sorry, I thought we were talking about the comments in that "Should Should You Rate Your Own Book?" thread in the authors' discussion group for which a link was posted. I haven't looked at Will's book page, and didn't realize it's had any action. I'll check that out tout suite.
Oh, there's now several negative reviews posted by the usual trolls, now... and Pendragon says Nancy G. was the only one who posted, so I suppose they are all by N.G. using fake names.
;)
I do have my suspicions about the 1-star ratings by "Will D" and "Stephan Pickering" :D.
General Zod
2019-12-03 23:15:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Michael Pendragon
AFAICS NancyGene is the only one who left a comment.
Sorry, I thought we were talking about the comments in that "Should Should You Rate Your Own Book?" thread in the authors' discussion group for which a link was posted. I haven't looked at Will's book page, and didn't realize it's had any action. I'll check that out tout suite.
Oh, there's now several negative reviews posted by the usual trolls, now... and Pendragon says Nancy G. was the only one who posted, so I suppose they are all by N.G. using fake names.
;)
I do have my suspicions about the 1-star ratings by "Will D" and "Stephan Pickering" :D.
Ha ha ha.....

The trolls are good for nothing... as per usual....!!
W***@none.i2p
2019-12-05 00:44:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
George J. Dance wrote on Tue, 03 December 2019 23:06
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Michael Pendragon
AFAICS NancyGene is the only one who left a comment.
Sorry, I thought we were talking about the comments in that "Should Should You Rate Your Own Book?" thread in the authors' discussion group for which a link was posted. I haven't looked at Will's book page, and didn't realize it's had any action. I'll check that out tout suite.
Oh, there's now several negative reviews posted by the usual trolls, now.... and Pendragon says Nancy G. was the only one who posted, so I suppose they are all by N.G. using fake names.
;)
I do have my suspicions about the 1-star ratings by "Will D" and "Stephan Pickering" :d.
To say the least :)
General Zod
2019-12-05 01:22:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by W***@none.i2p
George J. Dance wrote on Tue, 03 December 2019 23:06
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Michael Pendragon
AFAICS NancyGene is the only one who left a comment.
Sorry, I thought we were talking about the comments in that "Should Should You Rate Your Own Book?" thread in the authors' discussion group for which a link was posted. I haven't looked at Will's book page, and didn't realize it's had any action. I'll check that out tout suite.
Oh, there's now several negative reviews posted by the usual trolls, now.... and Pendragon says Nancy G. was the only one who posted, so I suppose they are all by N.G. using fake names.
;)
I do have my suspicions about the 1-star ratings by "Will D" and "Stephan Pickering" :d.
To say the least :)
It is puzzling why ME would make such a phone call to "help" someone she hates.....

That person being Doc....?
General Zod
2019-12-03 23:57:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Me
Post by Z***@none.i2p
Post by NancyGene
tacky and cheesy
That's actally describes your own Mad Magazine crap poetry, Nancy G........!!
No, the majority of the people said it was in bad taste to rate your own book.
You didn't even read the comments, did you?
AFAICS NancyGene is the only one who left a comment.
Sorry, I thought we were talking about the comments in that "Should Should You Rate Your Own Book?" thread in the authors' discussion group for which a link was posted. I haven't looked at Will's book page, and didn't realize it's had any action. I'll check that out tout suite.
Just a lot of trollish negativity....!!
Will Dockery
2019-12-03 22:02:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Me
No, the majority of the people said it was in bad taste to rate your own book.
You didn't even read the comments, did you?
Well, I don't really see it as being in bad taste, but I did remove my rating since another six month argument here over it doesn't seem worth it.

;)
General Zod
2019-12-03 18:58:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Why encourage trolls, Pendragon...??
Michael Pendragon
2019-12-03 19:06:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by General Zod
Why encourage trolls, Pendragon...??
The fake negative reviews cancel the fake positive reviews.

Why does everything Will does have to be some kind of a scam?
Will Dockery
2019-12-03 19:22:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Michael Pendragon
Why does everything Will does have to be
Obsessively fixated on by you and the other trolls?

I wonder that myself, Pendragon.

Here you go, obsess on:

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019

;)
Michael Pendragon
2019-12-03 19:38:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Why does everything Will does have to be
Obsessively fixated on by you and the other trolls?
I wonder that myself, Pendragon.
When you make over 100 posts a day, someone is bound to respond to one.

So why does everything you do have to be a scam?

Why can't you just put your book out and let it get whatever reviews come its way?

Having you family and friends "review" it makes it appear (to those of us who recognize the names) that it's a shoddy product that a bunch of con men are trying to put over on the rubes.

When you turn poetry into a carnival spiel, you cheapen the art form for all us.
Will Dockery
2019-12-03 19:41:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Michael Pendragon
Having you family and friends "review" it
They make that choice, you want I should tell them not to?

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
Michael Pendragon
2019-12-03 20:05:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Having you family and friends "review" it
They make that choice, you want I should tell them not to?
I wouldn't do it.

I haven't done it.

However, I cannot hold you to my standards.

I'm just letting you know why everyone thinks you're a four-flushing, self-deluded pretender.
General Zod
2019-12-03 20:17:15 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Pendragon standards....

A lying, gay laming misogynistic troll....

Such standards Pen has....!!
Will Dockery
2019-12-05 23:53:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
So, what did you tell this reporter about me and my book, "Me"?

;)
Michael Pendragon
2019-12-02 08:20:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Selected Poems 1976-2019 by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
"Will Dockery was born in La Grange, Georgia, in 1958. Inspired by the poetry of Poe and Rimbaud and the music of the Beatles and Bob Dylan, he began writing poetry and song lyrics in junior high, and has been producing poetry chapbooks and recording his songs since the 1980s. He is a well known performance poet, and a past recipient of Playgrounds magazine's Perky Award for poetry. He later wrote a column for Playgrounds for over a decade. He lives in Columbus, Georgia. This book brings together poetry and song lyrics from all five decades of Dockery's career so far, to give an intimate look at the man and his work." -George J Dance (Editor)
Which of you poems were inspired by Poe, Will?

What poetic techniques have you learned from Poe (provide specific examples from Poe's poetry and your own)?

What poetic themes do you and Poe have in common (again, provide specific examples)?

***
And since I would like to receive some sincere (and adequate) answers to my questions, I will provide you with a sample answer of my own.

I was not initially inspired by Edgar Poe -- although he is my literary God. He came to inspire me only *after* I'd discovered a similarity between our overall styles.

When I first read Poe's "The Raven" (in an eighth grade English class), I was delighted by how strongly our poetic sensibilities corresponded in terms of theme, mood and sound. We both had a fascination with death; were drawn to moods of mournfulness, sorrow, loss (especially those pertaining to the Christian mythology: loss of the soul, loss of Heaven, loss of the Afterlife).

Two years later, we read "To Helen," "The Bells," and "Annabel Lee," all of which served to establish Poe as one of my favorite poets. Around this same time, I wrote my first (surviving) poem, "The Fable of the Moonflower." I had written a few poems over the years, beginning with one about a haunted house at the age of ten-going-on-eleven, but had never dreamed of pursuing poetry as a career (or even as a semi-regular pastime). But my brother had been given a assignment to write a poem, which inspired me to write a poem of my own.

During my senior year in high school, I picked up the Laurel Poetry Series' "Poe: Complete Poems." It was a small, pocket-sized volume which I carried around with me and, eventually memorized.

What shocked me about this book was the discovery that my poem, "The Fable of the Moonflower," bore striking resemblances to two of Poe's poems that I'd never before seen: "Sonnet - To Science" and "The Sleeper" -- the former in terms of theme, the latter in terms of sound.

For example, consider what were, then, the opening lines of my poem:

'Twas moonrise in the mystic wood
That night when time began,

This struck me as being extremely similar to the opening lines of Poe's "The Sleeper":

At midnight, in the month of June,
I stand beneath the mystic moon.

Granted, the meter is different (mine switches from iambic octameter to iambic hexameter, whereas Poe's are both in in iambic octameter; and mine have an ABAB rhyme scheme, whereas Poe's are AABB), but the sonic similarity was, to me, as clear as day. For instance, our first lines both place alliterative "m"s on the stressed second and sixth feet. We also both use the words "mystic" and "(mid)night." Both openings set our poems in the outdoors, at night, under the light of a moon; and both, being somewhat mystical, have a fantastical/fairytale quality to them.

More striking, however, is the thematic correspondence between Poe's "Sonnet - To Science" and the third and fourth lines of my poem. Here is my complete opening stanza:

'Twas moonrise in the mystic wood
That night when time began,
As dryads fled from whence they'd stood
Surrend'ring Earth to man.

Compare this to the following excerpts from Poe's poem:

Science! true daughter of Old Time thou art!
Who alterest all things with thy peering eyes...
Hast thou not dragged Diana from her car,
And driven the Hamadryad from the wood
To seek a shelter in some happier star?...

My "night when time began" refers to the birth of, not science, per se, but of human *reason.* That is, when man became a reasoning animal (measuring time), he consequently dispensed with the mythological and supernatural creatures that had formed a large part of his spiritual existence up until that point. I, therefore, depict the dryads as leaving earth (surrendering it to man).

Poe calls science the "daughter of... Time," and similarly presents the dryads as having been driven from the earth ("to seek shelter in some happier star").

This is not to imply that my poem was anywhere near as good as Poe's. The remainder of mine was in the form of a simple little fable which was not on a par with the above-quoted opening.

However, the similarities (as I perceive them to be) led me to believe that Poe and I were of the same mindset, possessed a similar poetic ear, were servants of the same Muse.

Of course, my having memorized the majority of Poe's poems was bound to have an influence, to varying degrees, on all my future writings. When I poem is memorized, it becomes a part of a person's innermost psyche -- to such an extent that, over time, the memorized poet's words become indistinguishable from one's own.

My preference for rhymed/metered verse stems, in part, from my affinity for/with Poe; as does my predilection for dark, mournful, even horrific themes (although I was a horror fan long before I'd ever read Poe). A few of my tales and poems draw on Poe directly or allude to his works.

***

That is an example of how my poetry was influenced by Edgar Poe.

Your poetry, otoh, doesn't strike me as having anything in common with Poe's. It isn't written in traditional, rhymed/metered format; is based upon events in your life rather than the bulk of Poe's which had fantastic themes; and which read like (and in many cases has been recorded as) blues-oriented rock songs.

I could see you saying that you were inspired by Jim Morrison, Tom Waits or even Leonard Cohen... but Poe? That's as out of left field as Rimbaud (although I've only read Rimbaud in translation, and therefore don't feel qualified to discuss his work in this regard). The Beatles and Bob Dylan are closer to the mark, although I would say that Morrison is the primary influence on your work.

However, I'm willing to consider your argument for Poe. Use my example as a template, if necessary, and tell me how Poe directly influenced your work (making sure to provide examples to support your claims).
Z***@none.i2p
2019-12-02 09:10:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Michael Pendragon wrote on Mon, 02 December 2019 08:20
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Selected Poems 1976-2019 by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
"Will Dockery was born in La Grange, Georgia, in 1958. Inspired by the poetry of Poe and Rimbaud and the music of the Beatles and Bob Dylan, he began writing poetry and song lyrics in junior high, and has been producing poetry chapbooks and recording his songs since the 1980s. He is a well known performance poet, and a past recipient of Playgrounds magazine's Perky Award for poetry. He later wrote a column for Playgrounds for over a decade. He lives in Columbus, Georgia. This book brings together poetry and song lyrics from all five decades of Dockery's career so far, to give an intimate look at the man and his work." -George J Dance (Editor)
Which of you poems
Which of *you* poems....?

You're slipping, Pendragon....

Ha ha ha.....
Will Dockery
2019-12-02 17:39:57 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Selected Poems 1976-2019 by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
"Will Dockery was born in La Grange, Georgia, in 1958. Inspired by the poetry of Poe and Rimbaud and the music of the Beatles and Bob Dylan, he began writing poetry and song lyrics in junior high, and has been producing poetry chapbooks and recording his songs since the 1980s. He is a well known performance poet, and a past recipient of Playgrounds magazine's Perky Award for poetry. He later wrote a column for Playgrounds for over a decade. He lives in Columbus, Georgia. This book brings together poetry and song lyrics from all five decades of Dockery's career so far, to give an intimate look at the man and his work." -George J Dance (Editor)
Which of you poems were inspired by Poe, Will?
What poetic techniques have you learned from Poe (provide specific examples from Poe's poetry and your own)?
What poetic themes do you and Poe have in common (again, provide specific examples)?
***
And since I would like to receive some sincere (and adequate) answers to my questions, I will provide you with a sample answer of my own.
I was not initially inspired by Edgar Poe -- although he is my literary God. He came to inspire me only *after* I'd discovered a similarity between our overall styles.
When I first read Poe's "The Raven" (in an eighth grade English class), I was delighted by how strongly our poetic sensibilities corresponded in terms of theme, mood and sound. We both had a fascination with death; were drawn to moods of mournfulness, sorrow, loss (especially those pertaining to the Christian mythology: loss of the soul, loss of Heaven, loss of the Afterlife).
Two years later, we read "To Helen," "The Bells," and "Annabel Lee," all of which served to establish Poe as one of my favorite poets. Around this same time, I wrote my first (surviving) poem, "The Fable of the Moonflower." I had written a few poems over the years, beginning with one about a haunted house at the age of ten-going-on-eleven, but had never dreamed of pursuing poetry as a career (or even as a semi-regular pastime). But my brother had been given a assignment to write a poem, which inspired me to write a poem of my own.
During my senior year in high school, I picked up the Laurel Poetry Series' "Poe: Complete Poems." It was a small, pocket-sized volume which I carried around with me and, eventually memorized.
What shocked me about this book was the discovery that my poem, "The Fable of the Moonflower," bore striking resemblances to two of Poe's poems that I'd never before seen: "Sonnet - To Science" and "The Sleeper" -- the former in terms of theme, the latter in terms of sound.
'Twas moonrise in the mystic wood
That night when time began,
At midnight, in the month of June,
I stand beneath the mystic moon.
Granted, the meter is different (mine switches from iambic octameter to iambic hexameter, whereas Poe's are both in in iambic octameter; and mine have an ABAB rhyme scheme, whereas Poe's are AABB), but the sonic similarity was, to me, as clear as day. For instance, our first lines both place alliterative "m"s on the stressed second and sixth feet. We also both use the words "mystic" and "(mid)night." Both openings set our poems in the outdoors, at night, under the light of a moon; and both, being somewhat mystical, have a fantastical/fairytale quality to them.
'Twas moonrise in the mystic wood
That night when time began,
As dryads fled from whence they'd stood
Surrend'ring Earth to man.
Science! true daughter of Old Time thou art!
Who alterest all things with thy peering eyes...
Hast thou not dragged Diana from her car,
And driven the Hamadryad from the wood
To seek a shelter in some happier star?...
My "night when time began" refers to the birth of, not science, per se, but of human *reason.* That is, when man became a reasoning animal (measuring time), he consequently dispensed with the mythological and supernatural creatures that had formed a large part of his spiritual existence up until that point. I, therefore, depict the dryads as leaving earth (surrendering it to man).
Poe calls science the "daughter of... Time," and similarly presents the dryads as having been driven from the earth ("to seek shelter in some happier star").
This is not to imply that my poem was anywhere near as good as Poe's. The remainder of mine was in the form of a simple little fable which was not on a par with the above-quoted opening.
However, the similarities (as I perceive them to be) led me to believe that Poe and I were of the same mindset, possessed a similar poetic ear, were servants of the same Muse.
Of course, my having memorized the majority of Poe's poems was bound to have an influence, to varying degrees, on all my future writings. When I poem is memorized, it becomes a part of a person's innermost psyche -- to such an extent that, over time, the memorized poet's words become indistinguishable from one's own.
My preference for rhymed/metered verse stems, in part, from my affinity for/with Poe; as does my predilection for dark, mournful, even horrific themes (although I was a horror fan long before I'd ever read Poe). A few of my tales and poems draw on Poe directly or allude to his works.
***
That is an example of how my poetry was influenced by Edgar Poe.
Your poetry, otoh, doesn't strike me as having anything in common with Poe's. It isn't written in traditional, rhymed/metered format; is based upon events in your life rather than the bulk of Poe's which had fantastic themes; and which read like (and in many cases has been recorded as) blues-oriented rock songs.
I could see you saying that you were inspired by Jim Morrison, Tom Waits or even Leonard Cohen... but Poe? That's as out of left field as Rimbaud (although I've only read Rimbaud in translation, and therefore don't feel qualified to discuss his work in this regard). The Beatles and Bob Dylan are closer to the mark, although I would say that Morrison is the primary influence on your work.
However, I'm willing to consider your argument for Poe. Use my example as a template, if necessary, and tell me how Poe directly influenced your work (making sure to provide examples to support your claims).
Yes I was influenced by reading Poe to write my own poetry, as The Beatles also influenced me at around the same time.

;)
Z***@none.i2p
2019-12-02 12:10:16 UTC
Reply
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Will Dockery wrote on Sun, 01 December 2019 21:50
Post by Will Dockery
Selected Poems 1976-2019 by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
"Will Dockery was born in La Grange, Georgia, in 1958. Inspired by the poetry of Poe and Rimbaud and the music of the Beatles and Bob Dylan, he began writing poetry and song lyrics in junior high, and has been producing poetry chapbooks and recording his songs since the 1980s. He is a well known performance poet, and a past recipient of Playgrounds magazine's Perky Award for poetry. He later wrote a column for Playgrounds for over a decade. He lives in Columbus, Georgia. This book brings together poetry and song lyrics from all five decades of Dockery's career so far, to give an intimate look at the man and his work." -George J Dance (Editor)
Outstanding work, Doc........
General Zod
2019-12-03 18:36:14 UTC
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Permalink
Fake Conley, you are not only a sock, but you are a filthy and malicious one...!!
General Zod
2019-12-03 18:41:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Good Reads will delete troll posts, Nancy G.....
Michael Pendragon
2019-12-03 18:54:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by General Zod
Good Reads will delete troll posts, Nancy G.....
Why?

Unlike Amazon, they cannot confirm who has purchased he book, much less read it.
Z***@none.i2p
2019-12-04 05:15:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Will Dockery wrote on Sun, 01 December 2019 21:50
Post by Will Dockery
Selected Poems 1976-2019 by Will Dockery
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/48808396-selected-poems-1976-2019
"Will Dockery was born in La Grange, Georgia, in 1958. Inspired by the poetry of Poe and Rimbaud and the music of the Beatles and Bob Dylan, he began writing poetry and song lyrics in junior high, and has been producing poetry chapbooks and recording his songs since the 1980s. He is a well known performance poet, and a past recipient of Playgrounds magazine's Perky Award for poetry. He later wrote a column for Playgrounds for over a decade. He lives in Columbus, Georgia. This book brings together poetry and song lyrics from all five decades of Dockery's career so far, to give an intimate look at the man and his work." -George J Dance (Editor)
Outstanding sit, sadly, trolls are invading it....!!
Will Dockery
2019-12-04 23:10:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
You mean your phone calls aka stalking and harassing?

We know.

;)
ME
2019-12-04 23:54:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
You mean your phone calls aka stalking and harassing?
We know.
;)
No, dumb ass.
If you want to do real life here, why not suffer the consequences of real here?
General Zod
2019-12-04 23:58:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by ME
If you want to do real life here, why not suffer
Suffer....?
Will Dockery
2019-12-05 22:43:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Tim Chitwood remembers, I'm sure.

:)
Will Dockery
2019-12-05 22:57:42 UTC
Reply
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That's not your business, "Me".

;)
ME
2019-12-05 23:43:40 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
That's not your business, "Me".
;)
But don’t you want publicity for your chapbook? That is why you’ve bombarded this group with decades of your poetry and recently, about the release of of your chapbook. You want to get the word out there and sell books, don’t you?
Why not make use of the Columbus newspaper? Who can appreciate your talents more than your legions of friends and fans in shallowville?!!
It’s all about promoting you and your book, isn’t it?
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