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Ping: Will - Act of Will final text
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George J. Dance
2019-10-09 20:21:24 UTC
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Last night I added 2 more poems to the book, "Silver Glassy Rain" and "Corning Town," and considered it done. However, due to a problem with the interline spacing which I corrected today, both poems each turned out to be 3 pages long rather than the 4 I'd thought; meaning that I had to add 2 new single-pagers to keep the placement of the other poems unchanged.

I finally picked "Coil" and "Shadowville," using them to frame the descent into Hell sequence that makes up the bulk of part 2. That brings us to 60 poems (not counting the dedication), still on 122 pages. (I'll post the table of contents in this thread, if there's a demand for it.) I'd call that a wrap.

Accordingly, I'd like to make the pdf tonight and email it to you tomorrow.
Z***@none.i2p
2019-10-09 21:28:55 UTC
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Bring it on.........
General Zod
2019-10-12 04:58:35 UTC
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Post by George J. Dance
Last night I added 2 more poems to the book, "Silver Glassy Rain" and "Corning Town," and considered it done. However, due to a problem with the interline spacing which I corrected today, both poems each turned out to be 3 pages long rather than the 4 I'd thought; meaning that I had to add 2 new single-pagers to keep the placement of the other poems unchanged.
I finally picked "Coil" and "Shadowville," using them to frame the descent into Hell sequence that makes up the bulk of part 2. That brings us to 60 poems (not counting the dedication), still on 122 pages. (I'll post the table of contents in this thread, if there's a demand for it.) I'd call that a wrap.
Accordingly, I'd like to make the pdf tonight and email it to you tomorrow.
How is it coming along....?
George J. Dance
2019-10-12 15:42:24 UTC
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Post by General Zod
Post by George J. Dance
Last night I added 2 more poems to the book, "Silver Glassy Rain" and "Corning Town," and considered it done. However, due to a problem with the interline spacing which I corrected today, both poems each turned out to be 3 pages long rather than the 4 I'd thought; meaning that I had to add 2 new single-pagers to keep the placement of the other poems unchanged.
I finally picked "Coil" and "Shadowville," using them to frame the descent into Hell sequence that makes up the bulk of part 2. That brings us to 60 poems (not counting the dedication), still on 122 pages. (I'll post the table of contents in this thread, if there's a demand for it.) I'd call that a wrap.
Accordingly, I'd like to make the pdf tonight and email it to you tomorrow.
How is it coming along....?
I'm working on the title and colophon pages right now. The copyright notice is giving me some trouble, as it's long (7 lines), and I want to leave room for the LOC data to follow.
Hieronymous Corey
2019-10-12 15:44:53 UTC
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Who's the publisher?
Hieronymous Corey
2019-10-12 15:56:41 UTC
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If the book is self-published, then the notice should read "without permission of the author".
George J. Dance
2019-10-12 16:08:27 UTC
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Post by Hieronymous Corey
If the book is self-published, then the notice should read "without permission of the author".
I'd prefer that, as I'd prefer not to have to handle reprint requests (which I'd want to clear with Will, anyway).

Thanks for your help.

While that's a standard copyright notice, I do have another question about it:
should I add an explicit exception for reviewers?
Hieronymous Corey
2019-10-12 16:18:21 UTC
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Do you two have a publishing contract? It can help avoid confusion.
Authors give up their rights as copyright owners to their publishers,
so that if an author wants to do anything with their work subsequent
to publication, they need permission from their publisher. Will would
need your permission in order to post his own poems on his own site.
George J. Dance
2019-10-12 17:27:59 UTC
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Post by Hieronymous Corey
Do you two have a publishing contract? It can help avoid confusion.
Authors give up their rights as copyright owners to their publishers,
so that if an author wants to do anything with their work subsequent
to publication, they need permission from their publisher. Will would
need your permission in order to post his own poems on his own site.
I can't see any possibility of confusion. The copyright remains with Will, and the permission needed is now that of the author rather than the publishers.
Hieronymous Corey
2019-10-12 17:42:20 UTC
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That's great. Good luck!
Will Dockery
2019-10-12 19:13:31 UTC
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Post by Hieronymous Corey
Do you two have a publishing contract? It can help avoid confusion.
Authors give up their rights as copyright owners to their publishers,
so that if an author wants to do anything with their work subsequent
to publication, they need permission from their publisher. Will would
need your permission in order to post his own poems on his own site.
I can't go with that, of course... I haven't signed any of my rights away.

;)
Hieronymous Corey
2019-10-12 19:16:47 UTC
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Nobody is asking you to. George apparently made the necessary correction.
m***@gmail.com
2019-10-13 03:37:00 UTC
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Post by George J. Dance
Post by Hieronymous Corey
If the book is self-published, then the notice should read "without permission of the author".
I'd prefer that, as I'd prefer not to have to handle reprint requests (which I'd want to clear with Will, anyway).
Thanks for your help.
should I add an explicit exception for reviewers?
George J. Dance
2019-10-13 07:39:04 UTC
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Post by George J. Dance
Post by Hieronymous Corey
If the book is self-published, then the notice should read "without permission of the author".
I'd prefer that, as I'd prefer not to have to handle reprint requests (which I'd want to clear with Will, anyway).
Thanks for your help.
should I add an explicit exception for reviewers?
I think the last phrase, "except as provided by United States of America copyright law," covers that.
ME
2019-10-13 10:36:04 UTC
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mohani wrote nothing.
Post by George J. Dance
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Hieronymous Corey
If the book is self-published, then the notice should read "without permission of the author".
I'd prefer that, as I'd prefer not to have to handle reprint requests (which I'd want to clear with Will, anyway).
Thanks for your help.
should I add an explicit exception for reviewers?
I think the last phrase, "except as provided by United States of America copyright law," covers that.
George J. Dance
2019-10-13 10:49:04 UTC
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Post by ME
mohani wrote nothing.
Thank you, Captain Obvious.
Post by ME
Post by George J. Dance
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Hieronymous Corey
If the book is self-published, then the notice should read "without permission of the author".
I'd prefer that, as I'd prefer not to have to handle reprint requests (which I'd want to clear with Will, anyway).
Thanks for your help.
should I add an explicit exception for reviewers?
I think the last phrase, "except as provided by United States of America copyright law," covers that.
Hieronymous Corey
2019-10-13 10:52:35 UTC
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Funny thing, I actually know a guy name Mohani from Eritrea, who
doesn't read this group, but is who I thought of when I read that post.
ME
2019-10-13 11:09:06 UTC
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Post by George J. Dance
Post by ME
mohani wrote nothing.
Thank you, Captain Obvious.
You’re welcome peevy.
Post by George J. Dance
Post by ME
Post by George J. Dance
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Hieronymous Corey
If the book is self-published, then the notice should read "without permission of the author".
I'd prefer that, as I'd prefer not to have to handle reprint requests (which I'd want to clear with Will, anyway).
Thanks for your help.
should I add an explicit exception for reviewers?
I think the last phrase, "except as provided by United States of America copyright law," covers that.
Hieronymous Corey
2019-10-13 11:14:49 UTC
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Pssst.
ME
2019-10-13 11:45:15 UTC
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Post by Hieronymous Corey
Pssst.
What?
Hieronymous Corey
2019-10-13 11:50:08 UTC
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Whew. Good morning. Thanks. I was
starting to think you were ignoring me.
ME
2019-10-13 11:54:23 UTC
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Post by Hieronymous Corey
Whew. Good morning. Thanks. I was
starting to think you were ignoring me.
Now why would I do that?
The sweet, kind and gentile person that I am.
Hieronymous Corey
2019-10-13 12:00:36 UTC
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It's not a reflection on you. Lots of sweet,
kind and gentile people ignore me. You'd
be well within your rights to do the same.
Hieronymous Corey
2019-10-13 12:24:49 UTC
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See, that's what I mean. First, you were here,
and then you weren't, and now I'm thinking
you're ignoring me again, but that's just me,
and not a reflection on you, because you've
got your own life to live and things to do, and
I'm just here reading and writing all morning
like there's nothing more important than this.
ME
2019-10-13 12:35:19 UTC
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Post by Hieronymous Corey
See, that's what I mean. First, you were here,
and then you weren't, and now I'm thinking
you're ignoring me again, but that's just me,
and not a reflection on you, because you've
got your own life to live and things to do, and
I'm just here reading and writing all morning
like there's nothing more important than this.
I had to run out and get coffee.
Don't spaz out.
I’m here now.
Hieronymous Corey
2019-10-13 12:43:38 UTC
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Can I tell you something private?
I had two teeth pulled the other day,
and it's still really bothering me, a lot.
Thank God for ibuprofen. That really
helps with the physical discomfort, but
I still feel a bit traumatized emotionally.
I lost something. I'll never chew the same.
ME
2019-10-13 12:46:22 UTC
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Post by Hieronymous Corey
Can I tell you something private?
I had two teeth pulled the other day,
and it's still really bothering me, a lot.
Thank God for ibuprofen. That really
helps with the physical discomfort, but
I still feel a bit traumatized emotionally.
I lost something. I'll never chew the same.
So sorry to hear of your loss.
G***@none.i2p
2019-10-13 14:13:32 UTC
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Hieronymous Corey wrote on Sun, 13 October 2019 12:43
Post by Hieronymous Corey
Can I tell you something private?
I had two teeth pulled the other day,
and it's still really bothering me, a lot.
Thank God for ibuprofen. That really
helps with the physical discomfort, but
I still feel a bit traumatized emotionally.
I lost something. I'll never chew the same.
Hope you feel better soon, my friend...
Z***@none.i2p
2019-10-13 21:04:51 UTC
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Hieronymous Corey wrote on Sun, 13 October 2019 12:43
Post by Hieronymous Corey
Can I tell you something private?
Sure, but why not post it in your own thread...?
George J. Dance
2019-10-12 16:02:41 UTC
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Post by Hieronymous Corey
Who's the publisher?
Good question. For now, it's:

Principled Press, Toronto, Ontario (my imprint) and Lulu Press, Baltimore.

A U.S. publisher is required so that the LOC will catalog the book. If Will prefers to substitute his own imprint for Lulu, that can be done; so that's another PING for him.
Will Dockery
2019-10-12 18:52:45 UTC
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Post by George J. Dance
Post by Hieronymous Corey
Who's the publisher?
Principled Press, Toronto, Ontario (my imprint) and Lulu Press, Baltimore.
A U.S. publisher is required so that the LOC will catalog the book. If Will prefers to substitute his own imprint for Lulu, that can be done; so that's another PING for him.
You can use Will Dockery, P.O. Box 7394, Columbus Georgia 31908 U.S.A. instead of LuLu, for me. Print the entire address so readers/buyers can communicate directly with me.
Hieronymous Corey
2019-10-12 18:55:14 UTC
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Well, there you go. All good now?
George J. Dance
2019-10-12 19:01:58 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Hieronymous Corey
Who's the publisher?
Principled Press, Toronto, Ontario (my imprint) and Lulu Press, Baltimore.
A U.S. publisher is required so that the LOC will catalog the book. If Will prefers to substitute his own imprint for Lulu, that can be done; so that's another PING for him.
You can use Will Dockery, P.O. Box 7394, Columbus Georgia 31908 U.S.A. instead of LuLu, for me. Print the entire address so readers/buyers can communicate directly with me.
Thanks. I still need a credit for the front cover. "Courtesy Will Dockery" will do fine, as would be the creator's name if you have it. (As it was a work for hire, that's not needed.)
George J. Dance
2019-10-12 19:29:59 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Hieronymous Corey
Who's the publisher?
Principled Press, Toronto, Ontario (my imprint) and Lulu Press, Baltimore.
A U.S. publisher is required so that the LOC will catalog the book. If Will prefers to substitute his own imprint for Lulu, that can be done; so that's another PING for him.
You can use Will Dockery, P.O. Box 7394, Columbus Georgia 31908 U.S.A. instead of LuLu, for me. Print the entire address so readers/buyers can communicate directly with me.
I can use your name rather than Lulu's on the title page. I would prefer to just have "Will Dockery / Columbus, Georgia, U.S.A. on the title page, and print the full address as above on the colophon page, preferably right after the title.
Will Dockery
2019-10-12 19:43:27 UTC
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Post by George J. Dance
Post by Will Dockery
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Hieronymous Corey
Who's the publisher?
Principled Press, Toronto, Ontario (my imprint) and Lulu Press, Baltimore.
A U.S. publisher is required so that the LOC will catalog the book. If Will prefers to substitute his own imprint for Lulu, that can be done; so that's another PING for him.
You can use Will Dockery, P.O. Box 7394, Columbus Georgia 31908 U.S.A. instead of LuLu, for me. Print the entire address so readers/buyers can communicate directly with me.
I can use your name rather than Lulu's on the title page. I would prefer to just have "Will Dockery / Columbus, Georgia, U.S.A. on the title page, and print the full address as above on the colophon page, preferably right after the title.
That seems good, and:

© 2019 Will Dockery
All Rights Reserved
George J. Dance
2019-10-13 10:47:13 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Will Dockery
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Hieronymous Corey
Who's the publisher?
Principled Press, Toronto, Ontario (my imprint) and Lulu Press, Baltimore.
A U.S. publisher is required so that the LOC will catalog the book. If Will prefers to substitute his own imprint for Lulu, that can be done; so that's another PING for him.
You can use Will Dockery, P.O. Box 7394, Columbus Georgia 31908 U.S.A. instead of LuLu, for me. Print the entire address so readers/buyers can communicate directly with me.
I can use your name rather than Lulu's on the title page. I would prefer to just have "Will Dockery / Columbus, Georgia, U.S.A. on the title page, and print the full address as above on the colophon page, preferably right after the title.
© 2019 Will Dockery
All Rights Reserved
You know, I just realized that the first books won't have the LOC info in them, as you'll have to send copies to them first. Therefore, we will definitely have to redo the art in a couple of weeks anyway.

So (while I'll still send you a pdf tomorrow), I'll also send you some books right off the bat; and we can worry about last-minute corrections at the later date.

That means the back cover copy is suddenly a priority.
Will Dockery
2019-10-13 15:29:23 UTC
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Post by George J. Dance
Post by Will Dockery
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Will Dockery
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Hieronymous Corey
Who's the publisher?
Principled Press, Toronto, Ontario (my imprint) and Lulu Press, Baltimore.
A U.S. publisher is required so that the LOC will catalog the book. If Will prefers to substitute his own imprint for Lulu, that can be done; so that's another PING for him.
You can use Will Dockery, P.O. Box 7394, Columbus Georgia 31908 U.S.A. instead of LuLu, for me. Print the entire address so readers/buyers can communicate directly with me.
I can use your name rather than Lulu's on the title page. I would prefer to just have "Will Dockery / Columbus, Georgia, U.S.A. on the title page, and print the full address as above on the colophon page, preferably right after the title.
© 2019 Will Dockery
All Rights Reserved
You know, I just realized that the first books won't have the LOC info in them, as you'll have to send copies to them first. Therefore, we will definitely have to redo the art in a couple of weeks anyway.
So (while I'll still send you a pdf tomorrow), I'll also send you some books right off the bat; and we can worry about last-minute corrections at the later date.
That means the back cover copy is suddenly a priority.
Do you have the essay/introduction you had intended for the inside that you had planned on? Why not condense that into back cover copy, sort of bio/description of what the book does, in your vision of it?

Also such things as a price and my mailing address "for additional copies".

Again, using the City Lights Pocket Poets series as the standard, which I gae examples of back covers here of in one of these threads...
Will Dockery
2019-10-12 18:59:33 UTC
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Post by George J. Dance
Post by General Zod
Post by George J. Dance
Last night I added 2 more poems to the book, "Silver Glassy Rain" and "Corning Town," and considered it done. However, due to a problem with the interline spacing which I corrected today, both poems each turned out to be 3 pages long rather than the 4 I'd thought; meaning that I had to add 2 new single-pagers to keep the placement of the other poems unchanged.
I finally picked "Coil" and "Shadowville," using them to frame the descent into Hell sequence that makes up the bulk of part 2. That brings us to 60 poems (not counting the dedication), still on 122 pages. (I'll post the table of contents in this thread, if there's a demand for it.) I'd call that a wrap.
Accordingly, I'd like to make the pdf tonight and email it to you tomorrow.
How is it coming along....?
I'm working on the title and colophon pages right now. The copyright notice is giving me some trouble, as it's long (7 lines), and I want to leave room for the LOC data to follow.
As far as I remember (I'll be reading of any current changes soon) all that is needed is the Copyright notice:

Copyright © 2019 by Will Dockery

All the Library of Congress data is not required in the publication.
George J. Dance
2019-10-12 19:24:30 UTC
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Post by George J. Dance
Post by George J. Dance
Post by General Zod
Post by George J. Dance
Last night I added 2 more poems to the book, "Silver Glassy Rain" and "Corning Town," and considered it done. However, due to a problem with the interline spacing which I corrected today, both poems each turned out to be 3 pages long rather than the 4 I'd thought; meaning that I had to add 2 new single-pagers to keep the placement of the other poems unchanged.
I finally picked "Coil" and "Shadowville," using them to frame the descent into Hell sequence that makes up the bulk of part 2. That brings us to 60 poems (not counting the dedication), still on 122 pages. (I'll post the table of contents in this thread, if there's a demand for it.) I'd call that a wrap.
Accordingly, I'd like to make the pdf tonight and email it to you tomorrow.
How is it coming along....?
I'm working on the title and colophon pages right now. The copyright notice is giving me some trouble, as it's long (7 lines), and I want to leave room for the LOC data to follow.
Copyright © 2019 by Will Dockery
Bookdesigner.com says one should also add an "All rights reserve" line:

"The only elements required on a copyright page are the copyright notice itself:
© 2009 Joel Friedlander
And some statement giving notice that the rights to reproduce the work are reserved to the copyright holder.
All Rights Reserved."

https://www.thebookdesigner.com/2010/01/copyright-page-samples-you-can-copy-and-paste-into-your-book/

I'd prefer to use both the word 'copyright' and the symbol, as you have it.

We probably don't need the rest, if you see no use for it.
Post by George J. Dance
All the Library of Congress data is not required in the publication.
George J. Dance
2019-10-12 15:09:24 UTC
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Copyright notice

Copyright © 2019 by Will Dockery

All rights reserved. This book or parts thereof may not be reproduced in any form, stored in any retrieval system, or transmitted in any form by any means — electronic, mechanical, photocopy, recording, or otherwise — without prior written permission of the publisher, except as provided by United States of America copyright law.
George J. Dance
2019-10-13 07:41:19 UTC
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Post by George J. Dance
Copyright notice
Copyright © 2019 by Will Dockery
All rights reserved. This book or parts thereof may not be reproduced in any form, stored in any retrieval system, or transmitted in any form by any means — electronic, mechanical, photocopy, recording, or otherwise — without prior written permission of the publisher, except as provided by United States of America copyright law.
All this is pretty good, if there is room for it.
I reduced the type to 7.5 point and cut some; it now reads: "All rights reserved. This book or parts thereof may not be reproduced, stored in any retreival system, or transmitted,in any form by any means without prior permission of the author, except as provided by United States of America copyright law."

That fits on 5 lines, and is followed by your name and P.O. address.
Hieronymous Corey
2019-10-13 10:24:53 UTC
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Okay, that looks great, but now I'm wondering what would happen
if you did the exact opposite. I know somebody who did something
like this: "All rights reversed. This book may be reproduced, stored
in any retreival system, or transmitted in any form, by any means,
without any permission whatsoever.", and actually sold a few books.
George J. Dance
2019-10-13 16:12:52 UTC
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Post by Hieronymous Corey
Okay, that looks great, but now I'm wondering what would happen
if you did the exact opposite. I know somebody who did something
like this: "All rights reversed. This book may be reproduced, stored
in any retreival system, or transmitted in any form, by any means,
without any permission whatsoever.", and actually sold a few books.
That was clever, but I'd guess that few if anyone would notice that on their own. I can't remember ever having read an "All Rights Reserved" notice in a book except when I was trying to write one.
Will Dockery
2019-10-13 16:39:12 UTC
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Post by George J. Dance
Post by Hieronymous Corey
Okay, that looks great, but now I'm wondering what would happen
if you did the exact opposite. I know somebody who did something
like this: "All rights reversed. This book may be reproduced, stored
in any retreival system, or transmitted in any form, by any means,
without any permission whatsoever.", and actually sold a few books.
That was clever, but I'd guess that few if anyone would notice that on their own. I can't remember ever having read an "All Rights Reserved" notice in a book except when I was trying to write one.
Somewhere in one of these threads I go into detail on how I envision the back cover looking... I see some of those thoughts are indeed here.
George J. Dance
2019-10-13 18:43:32 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Somewhere in one of these threads I go into detail on how I envision the back cover looking... I see some of those thoughts are indeed here.
I have the links you sent, to Howl https://www.poemsearcher.com/topic/howl#&gid=1&pid=3

and Lunch Poems
Post by Will Dockery
Loading Image...
- basically, one large block of text. The problem for me is knowing what to put into it. I put together a draft earlier, after reading your PPP article, but I think it still needs work.


"Will Dockery was born in Columbus, Georgia, in 1958. Inspired by Poe and the Beatles, and later by Rimbaud and Dylan, he began writing poetry and songs in high school. He has been performing his poetry since the mid-1970s, and publishing it in chapbooks from the early 1980s. He is well known as a street poet in his hometown, winning the 1998 Perky Award for best Columbus poet given by the local entertainment magazine, Playgrounds. (He later wrote for Playgrounds for more than a decade.) He has also been a prolific songwriter, singing and recording his music with local musicians (often under the name Shadowville All-Stars"). Since the turn of the century he has also been posting his poems and songs on the internet, evolving from usenet to myspace, facebook, and most recently instagram."

Getting your thoughts on how I should take it would be helpful, and others' comments could be helpful as well.
Michael Pendragon
2019-10-13 20:22:09 UTC
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Post by George J. Dance
Post by Will Dockery
Somewhere in one of these threads I go into detail on how I envision the back cover looking... I see some of those thoughts are indeed here.
I have the links you sent, to Howl https://www.poemsearcher.com/topic/howl#&gid=1&pid=3
and Lunch Poems
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.burnsiderarebooks.com/pictures/140938359_2.jpg?v=1560136353
- basically, one large block of text. The problem for me is knowing what to put into it. I put together a draft earlier, after reading your PPP article, but I think it still needs work.
"Will Dockery was born in Columbus, Georgia, in 1958. Inspired by Poe and the Beatles, and later by Rimbaud and Dylan, he began writing poetry and songs in high school. He has been performing his poetry since the mid-1970s, and publishing it in chapbooks from the early 1980s. He is well known as a street poet in his hometown, winning the 1998 Perky Award for best Columbus poet given by the local entertainment magazine, Playgrounds. (He later wrote for Playgrounds for more than a decade.) He has also been a prolific songwriter, singing and recording his music with local musicians (often under the name Shadowville All-Stars"). Since the turn of the century he has also been posting his poems and songs on the internet, evolving from usenet to myspace, facebook, and most recently instagram."
Getting your thoughts on how I should take it would be helpful, and others' comments could be helpful as well.
While Poe and Rimbaud can get by with a one-name reference, Dylan cannot (in literary circles, Dylan implies Dylan Thomas more readily than Bob). The "later" period is also confusing, as it's followed by "he began writing poetry and songs in high school" (implying that both periods of inspiration took place prior to his having attended 9th grade).

I would cut the line about posting on the internet, as it makes him appear to be a rank amateur. I realize that he is a rank amateur (accent on the rank), but truth isn't always the strongest selling point.

"He is well known as a street poet" (i.e., a panhandler) is colorful, if not exactly an accomplishment. However, unnecessarily limiting it to his home town makes him seem unworthy of notice. If you're going to portray him as a street poet, hit that he's a traveling, vagabond poet-folk singer in the Woody Guthrie vein. IOW: "He is a well known street poet, and a past recipient of "Playgrounds" magazine's "Perky Award."

Similarly, readers don't need to know that "Playgrounds" is a local entertainment listings magazine (a.k.a., "fish wrap"). Self-published chapbooks are also not considered to be an accomplishment.

Also, the phrase "performing his poetry" sounds odd. I realize that you mean he's been singing his original song compositions since the mid-70s, which is how I would suggest you phrase it. Or, since Will's ego refuses to call his song lyrics what they are, you could go with something like: "He has been performing his original song compositions, and giving poetry recitals, since the mid-70s."

Finally, I would trim the "prolific songwriter" reference, as you'd already noted his song writing in the opening line.


Here's my full edit on the copy:

"Will Dockery was born in Columbus, Georgia, in 1958. Inspired by the poetry of Poe and Rimbaud and the music of the Beatles and Bob Dylan, he began writing poetry and songs in high school. He has been performing his original song compositions, and giving poetry recitals since the mid-70s. He is a well known street poet, and a past recipient of Playgrounds magazine's Perky Award. Since the turn of the century he has been singing and recording his music with the Shadowville All-Stars."
George J. Dance
2019-10-14 17:40:16 UTC
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Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Will Dockery
Somewhere in one of these threads I go into detail on how I envision the back cover looking... I see some of those thoughts are indeed here.
I have the links you sent, to Howl https://www.poemsearcher.com/topic/howl#&gid=1&pid=3
and Lunch Poems
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.burnsiderarebooks.com/pictures/140938359_2.jpg?v=1560136353
- basically, one large block of text. The problem for me is knowing what to put into it. I put together a draft earlier, after reading your PPP article, but I think it still needs work.
"Will Dockery was born in Columbus, Georgia, in 1958. Inspired by Poe and the Beatles, and later by Rimbaud and Dylan, he began writing poetry and songs in high school. He has been performing his poetry since the mid-1970s, and publishing it in chapbooks from the early 1980s. He is well known as a street poet in his hometown, winning the 1998 Perky Award for best Columbus poet given by the local entertainment magazine, Playgrounds. (He later wrote for Playgrounds for more than a decade.) He has also been a prolific songwriter, singing and recording his music with local musicians (often under the name Shadowville All-Stars"). Since the turn of the century he has also been posting his poems and songs on the internet, evolving from usenet to myspace, facebook, and most recently instagram."
Getting your thoughts on how I should take it would be helpful, and others' comments could be helpful as well.
While Poe and Rimbaud can get by with a one-name reference, Dylan cannot (in literary circles, Dylan implies Dylan Thomas more readily than Bob). The "later" period is also confusing, as it's followed by "he began writing poetry and songs in high school" (implying that both periods of inspiration took place prior to his having attended 9th grade).
I would cut the line about posting on the internet, as it makes him appear to be a rank amateur. I realize that he is a rank amateur (accent on the rank), but truth isn't always the strongest selling point.
"He is well known as a street poet" (i.e., a panhandler) is colorful, if not exactly an accomplishment. However, unnecessarily limiting it to his home town makes him seem unworthy of notice. If you're going to portray him as a street poet, hit that he's a traveling, vagabond poet-folk singer in the Woody Guthrie vein. IOW: "He is a well known street poet, and a past recipient of "Playgrounds" magazine's "Perky Award."
Similarly, readers don't need to know that "Playgrounds" is a local entertainment listings magazine (a.k.a., "fish wrap"). Self-published chapbooks are also not considered to be an accomplishment.
Also, the phrase "performing his poetry" sounds odd. I realize that you mean he's been singing his original song compositions since the mid-70s, which is how I would suggest you phrase it. Or, since Will's ego refuses to call his song lyrics what they are, you could go with something like: "He has been performing his original song compositions, and giving poetry recitals, since the mid-70s."
Finally, I would trim the "prolific songwriter" reference, as you'd already noted his song writing in the opening line.
"Will Dockery was born in Columbus, Georgia, in 1958. Inspired by the poetry of Poe and Rimbaud and the music of the Beatles and Bob Dylan, he began writing poetry and songs in high school. He has been performing his original song compositions, and giving poetry recitals since the mid-70s. He is a well known street poet, and a past recipient of Playgrounds magazine's Perky Award. Since the turn of the century he has been singing and recording his music with the Shadowville All-Stars."
Thank you. For now I've copied your paragraph, with mine, onto my wp, and I just plan to read them over for a bit.
Will Dockery
2019-10-13 20:45:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Will Dockery
Somewhere in one of these threads I go into detail on how I envision the back cover looking... I see some of those thoughts are indeed here.
I have the links you sent, to Howl https://www.poemsearcher.com/topic/howl#&gid=1&pid=3
and Lunch Poems
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.burnsiderarebooks.com/pictures/140938359_2.jpg?v=1560136353
- basically, one large block of text. The problem for me is knowing what to put into it. I put together a draft earlier, after reading your PPP article, but I think it still needs work.
"Will Dockery was born in Columbus, Georgia, in 1958. Inspired by Poe and the Beatles, and later by Rimbaud and Dylan, he began writing poetry and songs in high school. He has been performing his poetry since the mid-1970s, and publishing it in chapbooks from the early 1980s. He is well known as a street poet in his hometown, winning the 1998 Perky Award for best Columbus poet given by the local entertainment magazine, Playgrounds. (He later wrote for Playgrounds for more than a decade.) He has also been a prolific songwriter, singing and recording his music with local musicians (often under the name Shadowville All-Stars"). Since the turn of the century he has also been posting his poems and songs on the internet, evolving from usenet to myspace, facebook, and most recently instagram."
Getting your thoughts on how I should take it would be helpful, and others' comments could be helpful as well.
I'd add, at the start, something like "Earliest influences were Hank Williams and Popeye..." which led into Edgar Allan Poe and The Beatles.

My 1996 interview might be either helpful or of interest:

======================================================

Loading Image.../revision/latest?cb=20130329124506

Interview with Will Dockery 1996

Will Dockery interview from Playgrounds Magazine 1996 (Written by Frank Saunders)

Psychedelic Whirlwind an interview with Will Dockery by Frank Saunders
Screenshot of "Poet's Corner Profile featuring William Dockery"

Will Dockery is one of the most interesting people I know. It's a pleasure to call him my friend. He nearly defies description. The closest I've come to an accurate description of Will is this poem I wrote:

Psychedelic Whirlwind Prowling about like a psychedelic cheetah Roving Reporter of seamless nights. -F.S.

FS: Where and when were you born?

WD: La Grange Georgia, 1958.

FS: Who's been your biggest influence in writing poetry?

WD: Alec Lawson. (laughing) At this moment he's a big influence on me.

FS: (laughing) Really?

WD: I don't know if this is going to work now.

FS: Maybe not.

WD: Let's try outside.

We leave Al's apartment and invite everyone down to the courtyard
behind the Loft.*

WD: I think the Southern South of the Sixties influenced me the most. I don't think that Paul Westerberg show is sold out.

FS: You think I could get tickets?

Margie: I might have to work.

Alec: Blow it off.

FS: Sounds good to me.

WD: I gotta get a bead on this interview. Westerberg is a big influence. Let's step back here (pointing to the courtyard). Here is where I get most of my thoughts.

FS: Okay, where were we?

WD: You were asking me about my influences and I was gonna say Kerouac and The Beats but they weren't around then. so I'd have to say Popeye and Hank Williams.

FS: (big laughs and astonishment) What?

WD: Yeah, the '60s Popeye and Hank Williams.

FS: Well yes I loved the '60s Popeye, and Hank Williams is the greatest songwriter ever.

WD: They were a big influence. And who was the guy that played Hank Williams? George Hamilton? George Hamilton playing Hank Williams impersonating Popeye. But I consider myself a Southern poet.

FS: What started your writing?

WD: I would read Poe in Jr. High. I also used to draw a lot of comic strips when I worked at Cartersville Spinning Mill in Jordan City. Then I broke my wrist and George Bush got elected and the mill seemed to shut down simultaneously.

We have an intellectual but irrelevant discussion about our politics.
It adds to the Gestalt of the Will Dockery experience.*

WD: The great songwriters of the 80's Patti Smith, Paul Westerberg and now Pavement influence me a lot. Paul Westerberg has a great line [In Can't Hardly Wait] "Jesus rides beside me and never buys any smokes."

FS: Yeah, I love that line.

WD: ...He rhymes words that other people haven't before. I can't think of any now.

FS: It's rare that you hear rhymes no one has used before.

WD: I attempted some Burroughs cut up work. I haven't done any lately. My scissors are kind of dull.

FS: Some of your lines seem disconnected like that but they work.

WD: Well one time a man was reading over at the Street Preacher's box Mark Coile gave us and it was really garbled. I could only make out a few words here and there - mostly unprintable here in Playgrounds... Hey look, somebody's socks. It's performance art of some kind, I'm sure.

FS: A pair of dirty socks and a red solo cup.

WD: You were talking about the drive between here and LaGrange. I remember making that drive when I was young and hearing "Riders on the Storm" on AM radio. The line "His brain is screaming like a toad."

FS: Yeah, "Take a long holiday. Let your children play."

WD: Yeah I used to get a lot of thoughts drivin' a delivery truck after the mill shut down. You get really close to God behind the wheel of an automobile.

FS: I know I can't help but feel it then. Especially long drives. Speaking of which we are going to Paul Westerberg this weekend.

WD: Yes that's kind of tragic though. I have an extra ticket because the person that I bought it for is... well she won't be going.

FS: Well is there something you would like to say to her maybe in a veiled refernce perhaps?

WD: You should have that in the interview where you ask me that.

FS: Okay.

WD: Okay, I know what to say. I've still got the ticket though the show's over. If you want the ticket - it's better than nothing.

[from Playgrounds Magazine November 1996]

=======================================================

But, otherwise, at first glance, your back cover text looks good, George... I'll give you more feedback when things even out around here.
ME
2019-10-13 21:20:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Will Dockery
Somewhere in one of these threads I go into detail on how I envision the back cover looking... I see some of those thoughts are indeed here.
I have the links you sent, to Howl https://www.poemsearcher.com/topic/howl#&gid=1&pid=3
and Lunch Poems
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.burnsiderarebooks.com/pictures/140938359_2.jpg?v=1560136353
- basically, one large block of text. The problem for me is knowing what to put into it. I put together a draft earlier, after reading your PPP article, but I think it still needs work.
"Will Dockery was born in Columbus, Georgia, in 1958. Inspired by Poe and the Beatles, and later by Rimbaud and Dylan, he began writing poetry and songs in high school. He has been performing his poetry since the mid-1970s, and publishing it in chapbooks from the early 1980s. He is well known as a street poet in his hometown, winning the 1998 Perky Award for best Columbus poet given by the local entertainment magazine, Playgrounds. (He later wrote for Playgrounds for more than a decade.) He has also been a prolific songwriter, singing and recording his music with local musicians (often under the name Shadowville All-Stars"). Since the turn of the century he has also been posting his poems and songs on the internet, evolving from usenet to myspace, facebook, and most recently instagram."
Getting your thoughts on how I should take it would be helpful, and others' comments could be helpful as well.
I'd add, at the start, something like "Earliest influences were Hank Williams and Popeye..." which led into Edgar Allan Poe and The Beatles.
======================================================
https://vignette.wikia.nocookie.net/pennyspoetry/images/0/0d/Aap15.jpg/revision/latest?cb=20130329124506
Interview with Will Dockery 1996
Will Dockery interview from Playgrounds Magazine 1996 (Written by Frank Saunders)
Psychedelic Whirlwind an interview with Will Dockery by Frank Saunders
Screenshot of "Poet's Corner Profile featuring William Dockery"
Psychedelic Whirlwind Prowling about like a psychedelic cheetah Roving Reporter of seamless nights. -F.S.
FS: Where and when were you born?
WD: La Grange Georgia, 1958.
FS: Who's been your biggest influence in writing poetry?
WD: Alec Lawson. (laughing) At this moment he's a big influence on me.
FS: (laughing) Really?
WD: I don't know if this is going to work now.
FS: Maybe not.
WD: Let's try outside.
We leave Al's apartment and invite everyone down to the courtyard
behind the Loft.*
WD: I think the Southern South of the Sixties influenced me the most. I don't think that Paul Westerberg show is sold out.
FS: You think I could get tickets?
Margie: I might have to work.
Alec: Blow it off.
FS: Sounds good to me.
WD: I gotta get a bead on this interview. Westerberg is a big influence. Let's step back here (pointing to the courtyard). Here is where I get most of my thoughts.
FS: Okay, where were we?
WD: You were asking me about my influences and I was gonna say Kerouac and The Beats but they weren't around then. so I'd have to say Popeye and Hank Williams.
FS: (big laughs and astonishment) What?
WD: Yeah, the '60s Popeye and Hank Williams.
FS: Well yes I loved the '60s Popeye, and Hank Williams is the greatest songwriter ever.
WD: They were a big influence. And who was the guy that played Hank Williams? George Hamilton? George Hamilton playing Hank Williams impersonating Popeye. But I consider myself a Southern poet.
FS: What started your writing?
WD: I would read Poe in Jr. High. I also used to draw a lot of comic strips when I worked at Cartersville Spinning Mill in Jordan City. Then I broke my wrist and George Bush got elected and the mill seemed to shut down simultaneously.
We have an intellectual but irrelevant discussion about our politics.
It adds to the Gestalt of the Will Dockery experience.*
WD: The great songwriters of the 80's Patti Smith, Paul Westerberg and now Pavement influence me a lot. Paul Westerberg has a great line [In Can't Hardly Wait] "Jesus rides beside me and never buys any smokes."
FS: Yeah, I love that line.
WD: ...He rhymes words that other people haven't before. I can't think of any now.
FS: It's rare that you hear rhymes no one has used before.
WD: I attempted some Burroughs cut up work. I haven't done any lately. My scissors are kind of dull.
FS: Some of your lines seem disconnected like that but they work.
WD: Well one time a man was reading over at the Street Preacher's box Mark Coile gave us and it was really garbled. I could only make out a few words here and there - mostly unprintable here in Playgrounds... Hey look, somebody's socks. It's performance art of some kind, I'm sure.
FS: A pair of dirty socks and a red solo cup.
WD: You were talking about the drive between here and LaGrange. I remember making that drive when I was young and hearing "Riders on the Storm" on AM radio. The line "His brain is screaming like a toad."
FS: Yeah, "Take a long holiday. Let your children play."
WD: Yeah I used to get a lot of thoughts drivin' a delivery truck after the mill shut down. You get really close to God behind the wheel of an automobile.
FS: I know I can't help but feel it then. Especially long drives. Speaking of which we are going to Paul Westerberg this weekend.
WD: Yes that's kind of tragic though. I have an extra ticket because the person that I bought it for is... well she won't be going.
FS: Well is there something you would like to say to her maybe in a veiled refernce perhaps?
WD: You should have that in the interview where you ask me that.
FS: Okay.
WD: Okay, I know what to say. I've still got the ticket though the show's over. If you want the ticket - it's better than nothing.
[from Playgrounds Magazine November 1996]
=======================================================
But, otherwise, at first glance, your back cover text looks good, George... I'll give you more feedback when things even out around here.
Is this pissbum posting this or the fake/imposter will?
If it’s the real pissbum, I’d suggest you blame the fake/imposter will for that post.
Will Dockery
2019-10-13 21:23:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by ME
Post by Will Dockery
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Will Dockery
Somewhere in one of these threads I go into detail on how I envision the back cover looking... I see some of those thoughts are indeed here.
I have the links you sent, to Howl https://www.poemsearcher.com/topic/howl#&gid=1&pid=3
and Lunch Poems
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.burnsiderarebooks.com/pictures/140938359_2.jpg?v=1560136353
- basically, one large block of text. The problem for me is knowing what to put into it. I put together a draft earlier, after reading your PPP article, but I think it still needs work.
"Will Dockery was born in Columbus, Georgia, in 1958. Inspired by Poe and the Beatles, and later by Rimbaud and Dylan, he began writing poetry and songs in high school. He has been performing his poetry since the mid-1970s, and publishing it in chapbooks from the early 1980s. He is well known as a street poet in his hometown, winning the 1998 Perky Award for best Columbus poet given by the local entertainment magazine, Playgrounds. (He later wrote for Playgrounds for more than a decade.) He has also been a prolific songwriter, singing and recording his music with local musicians (often under the name Shadowville All-Stars"). Since the turn of the century he has also been posting his poems and songs on the internet, evolving from usenet to myspace, facebook, and most recently instagram."
Getting your thoughts on how I should take it would be helpful, and others' comments could be helpful as well.
I'd add, at the start, something like "Earliest influences were Hank Williams and Popeye..." which led into Edgar Allan Poe and The Beatles.
======================================================
https://vignette.wikia.nocookie.net/pennyspoetry/images/0/0d/Aap15.jpg/revision/latest?cb=20130329124506
Interview with Will Dockery 1996
Will Dockery interview from Playgrounds Magazine 1996 (Written by Frank Saunders)
Psychedelic Whirlwind an interview with Will Dockery by Frank Saunders
Screenshot of "Poet's Corner Profile featuring William Dockery"
Psychedelic Whirlwind Prowling about like a psychedelic cheetah Roving Reporter of seamless nights. -F.S.
FS: Where and when were you born?
WD: La Grange Georgia, 1958.
FS: Who's been your biggest influence in writing poetry?
WD: Alec Lawson. (laughing) At this moment he's a big influence on me.
FS: (laughing) Really?
WD: I don't know if this is going to work now.
FS: Maybe not.
WD: Let's try outside.
We leave Al's apartment and invite everyone down to the courtyard
behind the Loft.*
WD: I think the Southern South of the Sixties influenced me the most. I don't think that Paul Westerberg show is sold out.
FS: You think I could get tickets?
Margie: I might have to work.
Alec: Blow it off.
FS: Sounds good to me.
WD: I gotta get a bead on this interview. Westerberg is a big influence. Let's step back here (pointing to the courtyard). Here is where I get most of my thoughts.
FS: Okay, where were we?
WD: You were asking me about my influences and I was gonna say Kerouac and The Beats but they weren't around then. so I'd have to say Popeye and Hank Williams.
FS: (big laughs and astonishment) What?
WD: Yeah, the '60s Popeye and Hank Williams.
FS: Well yes I loved the '60s Popeye, and Hank Williams is the greatest songwriter ever.
WD: They were a big influence. And who was the guy that played Hank Williams? George Hamilton? George Hamilton playing Hank Williams impersonating Popeye. But I consider myself a Southern poet.
FS: What started your writing?
WD: I would read Poe in Jr. High. I also used to draw a lot of comic strips when I worked at Cartersville Spinning Mill in Jordan City. Then I broke my wrist and George Bush got elected and the mill seemed to shut down simultaneously.
We have an intellectual but irrelevant discussion about our politics.
It adds to the Gestalt of the Will Dockery experience.*
WD: The great songwriters of the 80's Patti Smith, Paul Westerberg and now Pavement influence me a lot. Paul Westerberg has a great line [In Can't Hardly Wait] "Jesus rides beside me and never buys any smokes."
FS: Yeah, I love that line.
WD: ...He rhymes words that other people haven't before. I can't think of any now.
FS: It's rare that you hear rhymes no one has used before.
WD: I attempted some Burroughs cut up work. I haven't done any lately. My scissors are kind of dull.
FS: Some of your lines seem disconnected like that but they work.
WD: Well one time a man was reading over at the Street Preacher's box Mark Coile gave us and it was really garbled. I could only make out a few words here and there - mostly unprintable here in Playgrounds... Hey look, somebody's socks. It's performance art of some kind, I'm sure.
FS: A pair of dirty socks and a red solo cup.
WD: You were talking about the drive between here and LaGrange. I remember making that drive when I was young and hearing "Riders on the Storm" on AM radio. The line "His brain is screaming like a toad."
FS: Yeah, "Take a long holiday. Let your children play."
WD: Yeah I used to get a lot of thoughts drivin' a delivery truck after the mill shut down. You get really close to God behind the wheel of an automobile.
FS: I know I can't help but feel it then. Especially long drives. Speaking of which we are going to Paul Westerberg this weekend.
WD: Yes that's kind of tragic though. I have an extra ticket because the person that I bought it for is... well she won't be going.
FS: Well is there something you would like to say to her maybe in a veiled refernce perhaps?
WD: You should have that in the interview where you ask me that.
FS: Okay.
WD: Okay, I know what to say. I've still got the ticket though the show's over. If you want the ticket - it's better than nothing.
[from Playgrounds Magazine November 1996]
=======================================================
But, otherwise, at first glance, your back cover text looks good, George... I'll give you more feedback when things even out around here.
I’d suggest
<snip>

No thanks to any suggestions you have, no offense, "Me".

;)
Z***@none.i2p
2019-10-13 21:27:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
The Real Will Dockery wrote on Sun, 13 October 2019 21:23
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Will Dockery
Somewhere in one of these threads I go into detail on how I envision the back cover looking... I see some of those thoughts are indeed here.
I have the links you sent, to Howl https://www.poemsearcher.com/topic/howl#&gid=1&pid=3
and Lunch Poems
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.burnsiderarebooks.com/pictures/140938359_2.jpg?v=1560136353
- basically, one large block of text. The problem for me is knowing what to put into it. I put together a draft earlier, after reading your PPP article, but I think it still needs work.
"Will Dockery was born in Columbus, Georgia, in 1958. Inspired by Poe and the Beatles, and later by Rimbaud and Dylan, he began writing poetry and songs in high school. He has been performing his poetry since the mid-1970s, and publishing it in chapbooks from the early 1980s. He is well known as a street poet in his hometown, winning the 1998 Perky Award for best Columbus poet given by the local entertainment magazine, Playgrounds. (He later wrote for Playgrounds for more than a decade.) He has also been a prolific songwriter, singing and recording his music with local musicians (often under the name Shadowville All-Stars"). Since the turn of the century he has also been posting his poems and songs on the internet, evolving from usenet to myspace, facebook, and most recently instagram."
Getting your thoughts on how I should take it would be helpful, and others' comments could be helpful as well.
I'd add, at the start, something like "Earliest influences were Hank Williams and Popeye..." which led into Edgar Allan Poe and The Beatles.
======================================================
https://vignette.wikia.nocookie.net/pennyspoetry/images/0/0d/Aap15.jpg/revision/latest?cb=20130329124506
Interview with Will Dockery 1996
Will Dockery interview from Playgrounds Magazine 1996 (Written by Frank Saunders)
Psychedelic Whirlwind an interview with Will Dockery by Frank Saunders
Screenshot of "Poet's Corner Profile featuring William Dockery"
Psychedelic Whirlwind Prowling about like a psychedelic cheetah Roving Reporter of seamless nights. -F.S.
FS: Where and when were you born?
WD: La Grange Georgia, 1958.
FS: Who's been your biggest influence in writing poetry?
WD: Alec Lawson. (laughing) At this moment he's a big influence on me.
FS: (laughing) Really?
WD: I don't know if this is going to work now.
FS: Maybe not.
WD: Let's try outside.
We leave Al's apartment and invite everyone down to the courtyard
behind the Loft.*
WD: I think the Southern South of the Sixties influenced me the most. I don't think that Paul Westerberg show is sold out.
FS: You think I could get tickets?
Margie: I might have to work.
Alec: Blow it off.
FS: Sounds good to me.
WD: I gotta get a bead on this interview. Westerberg is a big influence.. Let's step back here (pointing to the courtyard). Here is where I get most of my thoughts.
FS: Okay, where were we?
WD: You were asking me about my influences and I was gonna say Kerouac and The Beats but they weren't around then. so I'd have to say Popeye and Hank Williams.
FS: (big laughs and astonishment) What?
WD: Yeah, the '60s Popeye and Hank Williams.
FS: Well yes I loved the '60s Popeye, and Hank Williams is the greatest songwriter ever.
WD: They were a big influence. And who was the guy that played Hank Williams? George Hamilton? George Hamilton playing Hank Williams impersonating Popeye. But I consider myself a Southern poet.
FS: What started your writing?
WD: I would read Poe in Jr. High. I also used to draw a lot of comic strips when I worked at Cartersville Spinning Mill in Jordan City. Then I broke my wrist and George Bush got elected and the mill seemed to shut down simultaneously.
We have an intellectual but irrelevant discussion about our politics.
It adds to the Gestalt of the Will Dockery experience.*
WD: The great songwriters of the 80's Patti Smith, Paul Westerberg and now Pavement influence me a lot. Paul Westerberg has a great line [In Can't Hardly Wait] "Jesus rides beside me and never buys any smokes."
FS: Yeah, I love that line.
WD: ...He rhymes words that other people haven't before. I can't think of any now.
FS: It's rare that you hear rhymes no one has used before.
WD: I attempted some Burroughs cut up work. I haven't done any lately. My scissors are kind of dull.
FS: Some of your lines seem disconnected like that but they work.
WD: Well one time a man was reading over at the Street Preacher's box Mark Coile gave us and it was really garbled. I could only make out a few words here and there - mostly unprintable here in Playgrounds... Hey look, somebody's socks. It's performance art of some kind, I'm sure.
FS: A pair of dirty socks and a red solo cup.
WD: You were talking about the drive between here and LaGrange. I remember making that drive when I was young and hearing "Riders on the Storm" on AM radio. The line "His brain is screaming like a toad."
FS: Yeah, "Take a long holiday. Let your children play."
WD: Yeah I used to get a lot of thoughts drivin' a delivery truck after the mill shut down. You get really close to God behind the wheel of an automobile.
FS: I know I can't help but feel it then. Especially long drives. Speaking of which we are going to Paul Westerberg this weekend.
WD: Yes that's kind of tragic though. I have an extra ticket because the person that I bought it for is... well she won't be going.
FS: Well is there something you would like to say to her maybe in a veiled refernce perhaps?
WD: You should have that in the interview where you ask me that.
FS: Okay.
WD: Okay, I know what to say. I've still got the ticket though the show's over. If you want the ticket - it's better than nothing.
[from Playgrounds Magazine November 1996]
=======================================================
But, otherwise, at first glance, your back cover text looks good, George... I'll give you more feedback when things even out around here.
I'd suggest
<snip>
No thanks to any suggestions you have, no offense, "Me".
;)
True, as if an ignorant stalker troll with a stinky upper lip like "ME" is on any level to offer a suggestion....

Ha ha ha....
ME
2019-10-13 21:46:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Will, you think that this ‘interview’ will somehow increase the sales of your pocketbook?
Do you read things before you hit post?
I’ve asked this before. So don’t do the confused deflection.
You really don’t read, comprehend or see what others do, do you?
Will Dockery
2019-10-13 21:50:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by ME
Will, you think that this ‘interview’ will somehow increase
<snip>

I re-posted it for George Dance to add Hank Williams and Popeye as my two earliest influences, the interview is not going into the book, or anything.

Sorry to confuse you.
Z***@none.i2p
2019-10-13 22:01:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
The Real Will Dockery wrote on Sun, 13 October 2019 21:50
Post by Will Dockery
Will, you think that this 'interview' will somehow increase
<snip>
I re-posted it for George Dance to add Hank Williams and Popeye as my two earliest influences, the interview is not going into the book, or anything.
Sorry to confuse you.
You know ole stinky lips......... "ME" stays in a constant stae of ignorant, trollish confusion.............
ME
2019-10-13 22:04:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by ME
Will, you think that this ‘interview’ will somehow increase
<snip>
I re-posted it for George Dance to add Hank Williams and Popeye as my two earliest influences, the interview is not going into the book, or anything.
Sorry to confuse you.
I wasn’t confused. I was more amused.
But, y’all can add as many ‘accolades’ for you as y’all care to share about your ‘forthcoming book’. No matter how stupid and embarrassing these ‘blurbs’ are, they’ll never see the light of day!!!
But since I doubt you or dunce has $2,500 between you, the Library of Congress will just have wait. But keep posting about will: keep the dream alive!
Besides, you three have got to have something to discuss here.
Z***@none.i2p
2019-10-13 22:12:19 UTC
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ME[8
Post by Will Dockery
Will, you think that this 'interview' will somehow increase
<snip>
I re-posted it for George Dance to add Hank Williams and Popeye as my two earliest influences, the interview is not going into the book, or anything..
Sorry to confuse you.
I wasn't confused.
You sure looked like you were confused......

It is okay if you do not want to admit you were confused......

Ha ha ha....
ME
2019-10-13 22:18:48 UTC
Reply
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Post by Z***@none.i2p
ME[8
Post by Will Dockery
Will, you think that this 'interview' will somehow increase
<snip>
I re-posted it for George Dance to add Hank Williams and Popeye as my two earliest influences, the interview is not going into the book, or anything..
Sorry to confuse you.
I wasn't confused.
You sure looked like you were confused......
It is okay if you do not want to admit you were confused......
Ha ha ha....
Zid, I was amused, not confused. You can read, without assistance, can’t you?
Z***@none.i2p
2019-10-13 22:31:07 UTC
Reply
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ME[8
Post by ME
Post by Z***@none.i2p
ME[8
Post by Will Dockery
Will, you think that this 'interview' will somehow increase
<snip>
I re-posted it for George Dance to add Hank Williams and Popeye as my two earliest influences, the interview is not going into the book, or anything..
Sorry to confuse you.
I wasn't confused.
You sure looked like you were confused......
It is okay if you do not want to admit you were confused......
Ha ha ha....
Zid, I was amused, not confused
You look pretty damn confused to me.....

Just sayin.........
ME
2019-10-13 22:37:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Z***@none.i2p
ME[8
Post by ME
Post by Z***@none.i2p
ME[8
Post by Will Dockery
Will, you think that this 'interview' will somehow increase
<snip>
I re-posted it for George Dance to add Hank Williams and Popeye as my two earliest influences, the interview is not going into the book, or anything..
Sorry to confuse you.
I wasn't confused.
You sure looked like you were confused......
It is okay if you do not want to admit you were confused......
Ha ha ha....
Zid, I was amused, not confused
You look pretty damn confused to me.....
Just sayin.........
Then zid, explain what I look confused about?
Will Dockery
2019-10-13 23:02:09 UTC
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Permalink
Post by ME
explain what I look confused about
The part about "$2,500 between you, the Library of Congress will just have wait..."

:)
ME
2019-10-13 23:07:07 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by ME
explain what I look confused about
The part about "$2,500 between you, the Library of Congress will just have wait..."
:)
between you: meaning you and dunce. Do either of you have $2500 to invest in this, with the knowledge that there might not be enough profit to pay back the $2500 investment?

Glad to clear that up for you.......
Z***@none.i2p
2019-10-13 23:12:48 UTC
Reply
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ME[8
Post by ME
Post by Will Dockery
Post by ME
explain what I look confused about
The part about "$2,500 between you, the Library of Congress will just have wait..."
:)
between you: meaning you and dunce. Do either of you have $2500 to invest in this, with the knowledge that there might not be enough profit to pay back the $2500 investment?
Glad to clear that up for you.......
Okay, enlighten me, where are you arriving at a $2,500 figure here.....?
Me
2019-10-13 23:14:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Z***@none.i2p
ME[8
Post by ME
Post by Will Dockery
Post by ME
explain what I look confused about
The part about "$2,500 between you, the Library of Congress will just have wait..."
:)
between you: meaning you and dunce. Do either of you have $2500 to invest in this, with the knowledge that there might not be enough profit to pay back the $2500 investment?
Glad to clear that up for you.......
Okay, enlighten me, where are you arriving at a $2,500 figure here.....?
Will?
Z***@none.i2p
2019-10-13 23:17:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Me[9
Post by Z***@none.i2p
ME[8
Post by ME
Post by Will Dockery
Post by ME
explain what I look confused about
The part about "$2,500 between you, the Library of Congress will just have wait..."
:)
between you: meaning you and dunce. Do either of you have $2500 to invest in this, with the knowledge that there might not be enough profit to pay back the $2500 investment?
Glad to clear that up for you.......
Okay, enlighten me, where are you arriving at a $2,500 figure here.....?
Will?
What are you thinking will cost $2,500..........?

Just curious..............
Me
2019-10-13 23:21:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Z***@none.i2p
Me[9
Post by Z***@none.i2p
ME[8
Post by ME
Post by Will Dockery
Post by ME
explain what I look confused about
The part about "$2,500 between you, the Library of Congress will just have wait..."
:)
between you: meaning you and dunce. Do either of you have $2500 to invest in this, with the knowledge that there might not be enough profit to pay back the $2500 investment?
Glad to clear that up for you.......
Okay, enlighten me, where are you arriving at a $2,500 figure here.....?
Will?
What are you thinking will cost $2,500..........?
Just curious..............
Will?
Will Dockery
2019-10-13 23:21:20 UTC
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Permalink
between you: meaning you and dance. Do either of you have $2500 to invest
So, where are you coming up with that amount of money, "Me"?
Me
2019-10-13 23:26:54 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
between you: meaning you and dance. Do either of you have $2500 to invest
So, where are you coming up with that amount of money, "Me"?
Even low end diy publishing cost money. And shipping, copyright, and the rest of things y’all are claiming that will be included in getting this book out, costs money.
Is kinkos still around?
Will Dockery
2019-10-13 23:35:14 UTC
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Post by Me
Post by Will Dockery
between you: meaning you and dance. Do either of you have $2500 to invest
So, where are you coming up with that amount of money, "Me"?
Even low end diy publishing cost money. And shipping, copyright, and the rest of things y’all are claiming that will be included in getting this book out, costs money.
Is kinkos still around?
I'll be going with a "print on demand" method for mail order sales, and George Dance has connections with Canadian book stores, I think we'll do all tight.

;)
Me
2019-10-13 23:45:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Me
Post by Will Dockery
between you: meaning you and dance. Do either of you have $2500 to invest
So, where are you coming up with that amount of money, "Me"?
Even low end diy publishing cost money. And shipping, copyright, and the rest of things y’all are claiming that will be included in getting this book out, costs money.
Is kinkos still around?
I'll be going with a "print on demand" method for mail order sales, and George Dance has connections with Canadian book stores, I think we'll do all tight.
;)
So $2.95 - $4.95/book. But don’t some require at least a 20 book minimum?
And this isn’t exactly a professional publication is it?
So, submit the fucking PDF to them and be done with it.
Shit, I’ve spent more on invitations to party than y’all will shell out for this chapbook.
Damn it. Be done with it, already.
Z***@none.i2p
2019-10-13 23:55:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Me[9
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
between you: meaning you and dance. Do either of you have $2500 to invest
So, where are you coming up with that amount of money, "Me"?
Even low end diy publishing cost money. And shipping, copyright, and the rest of things y'all are claiming that will be included in getting this book out, costs money.
Is kinkos still around?
I'll be going with a "print on demand" method for mail order sales, and George Dance has connections with Canadian book stores, I think we'll do all tight.
;)
So $2.95 - $4.95/book. But don't some require at least a 20 book minimum?
And this isn't exactly a professional publication is it?
So, submit the fucking PDF to them and be done with it.
Shit, I've spent more on invitations to party than y'all will shell out for this chapbook.
Damn it. Be done with it, already.
For once you seem to be trying to help, I applaud you......
Will Dockery
2019-10-13 22:14:40 UTC
Reply
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Post by ME
But since I doubt you or dunce has $2,500 between you, the Library of Congress will just have wait
Seriously, you truly are confused, now.

;)
ME
2019-10-13 22:16:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by ME
But since I doubt you or dunce has $2,500 between you, the Library of Congress will just have wait
Seriously, you truly are confused, now.
;)
Surely, you jest!!
Will Dockery
2019-10-13 22:25:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by ME
Post by Will Dockery
Post by ME
But since I doubt you or dunce has $2,500 between you, the Library of Congress will just have wait
Seriously, you truly are confused, now.
;)
Surely, you jest!!
No...

;)
George J. Dance
2019-10-14 14:41:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Will Dockery
Somewhere in one of these threads I go into detail on how I envision the back cover looking... I see some of those thoughts are indeed here.
I have the links you sent, to Howl https://www.poemsearcher.com/topic/howl#&gid=1&pid=3
and Lunch Poems
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.burnsiderarebooks.com/pictures/140938359_2.jpg?v=1560136353
- basically, one large block of text. The problem for me is knowing what to put into it. I put together a draft earlier, after reading your PPP article, but I think it still needs work.
"Will Dockery was born in Columbus, Georgia, in 1958. Inspired by Poe and the Beatles, and later by Rimbaud and Dylan, he began writing poetry and songs in high school. He has been performing his poetry since the mid-1970s, and publishing it in chapbooks from the early 1980s. He is well known as a street poet in his hometown, winning the 1998 Perky Award for best Columbus poet given by the local entertainment magazine, Playgrounds. (He later wrote for Playgrounds for more than a decade.) He has also been a prolific songwriter, singing and recording his music with local musicians (often under the name Shadowville All-Stars"). Since the turn of the century he has also been posting his poems and songs on the internet, evolving from usenet to myspace, facebook, and most recently instagram."
Getting your thoughts on how I should take it would be helpful, and others' comments could be helpful as well.
I'd add, at the start, something like "Earliest influences were Hank Williams and Popeye..." which led into Edgar Allan Poe and The Beatles.
======================================================
https://vignette.wikia.nocookie.net/pennyspoetry/images/0/0d/Aap15.jpg/revision/latest?cb=20130329124506
Interview with Will Dockery 1996
Will Dockery interview from Playgrounds Magazine 1996 (Written by Frank Saunders)
Psychedelic Whirlwind an interview with Will Dockery by Frank Saunders
Screenshot of "Poet's Corner Profile featuring William Dockery"
Psychedelic Whirlwind Prowling about like a psychedelic cheetah Roving Reporter of seamless nights. -F.S.
FS: Where and when were you born?
WD: La Grange Georgia, 1958.
FS: Who's been your biggest influence in writing poetry?
WD: Alec Lawson. (laughing) At this moment he's a big influence on me.
FS: (laughing) Really?
WD: I don't know if this is going to work now.
FS: Maybe not.
WD: Let's try outside.
We leave Al's apartment and invite everyone down to the courtyard
behind the Loft.*
WD: I think the Southern South of the Sixties influenced me the most. I don't think that Paul Westerberg show is sold out.
FS: You think I could get tickets?
Margie: I might have to work.
Alec: Blow it off.
FS: Sounds good to me.
WD: I gotta get a bead on this interview. Westerberg is a big influence. Let's step back here (pointing to the courtyard). Here is where I get most of my thoughts.
FS: Okay, where were we?
WD: You were asking me about my influences and I was gonna say Kerouac and The Beats but they weren't around then. so I'd have to say Popeye and Hank Williams.
FS: (big laughs and astonishment) What?
WD: Yeah, the '60s Popeye and Hank Williams.
FS: Well yes I loved the '60s Popeye, and Hank Williams is the greatest songwriter ever.
WD: They were a big influence. And who was the guy that played Hank Williams? George Hamilton? George Hamilton playing Hank Williams impersonating Popeye. But I consider myself a Southern poet.
FS: What started your writing?
WD: I would read Poe in Jr. High. I also used to draw a lot of comic strips when I worked at Cartersville Spinning Mill in Jordan City. Then I broke my wrist and George Bush got elected and the mill seemed to shut down simultaneously.
We have an intellectual but irrelevant discussion about our politics.
It adds to the Gestalt of the Will Dockery experience.*
WD: The great songwriters of the 80's Patti Smith, Paul Westerberg and now Pavement influence me a lot. Paul Westerberg has a great line [In Can't Hardly Wait] "Jesus rides beside me and never buys any smokes."
FS: Yeah, I love that line.
WD: ...He rhymes words that other people haven't before. I can't think of any now.
FS: It's rare that you hear rhymes no one has used before.
WD: I attempted some Burroughs cut up work. I haven't done any lately. My scissors are kind of dull.
FS: Some of your lines seem disconnected like that but they work.
WD: Well one time a man was reading over at the Street Preacher's box Mark Coile gave us and it was really garbled. I could only make out a few words here and there - mostly unprintable here in Playgrounds... Hey look, somebody's socks. It's performance art of some kind, I'm sure.
FS: A pair of dirty socks and a red solo cup.
WD: You were talking about the drive between here and LaGrange. I remember making that drive when I was young and hearing "Riders on the Storm" on AM radio. The line "His brain is screaming like a toad."
FS: Yeah, "Take a long holiday. Let your children play."
WD: Yeah I used to get a lot of thoughts drivin' a delivery truck after the mill shut down. You get really close to God behind the wheel of an automobile.
FS: I know I can't help but feel it then. Especially long drives. Speaking of which we are going to Paul Westerberg this weekend.
WD: Yes that's kind of tragic though. I have an extra ticket because the person that I bought it for is... well she won't be going.
FS: Well is there something you would like to say to her maybe in a veiled refernce perhaps?
WD: You should have that in the interview where you ask me that.
FS: Okay.
WD: Okay, I know what to say. I've still got the ticket though the show's over. If you want the ticket - it's better than nothing.
[from Playgrounds Magazine November 1996]
=======================================================
My first question is: what were you guys smoking? My second is: who is Frank Saunders? I see he wrote poetry. Has he published a book (either chap- or full-length)?

The reason I ask is that I'm still looking for quotations for the back cover - not to have 'names' there, but to give more insight on you. And the above one looks good.

"Will Dockery is one of the most interesting people I know. It's a pleasure to call him my friend. He nearly defies description. The closest I've come to an accurate description of Will is this poem I wrote: 'Psychedelic Whirlwind / Prowling about like a psychedelic cheetah / Roving Reporter of seamless nights.'" Frank Saunders, author of ___________

It would be great if you could contact him and see if he's willing to go onto the cover.
Post by Will Dockery
But, otherwise, at first glance, your back cover text looks good, George... I'll give you more feedback when things even out around here.
I'd still like to add a few quotations to the back cover - I'm thinking Howe and Benders as well as Saunders - and there are probably others, on Usenet, that I haven't found at this time, or have forgotten.

But I don't want to hold the book up for those; they could be added at the same time we add the LOC stuff. I'd like to take the next step (going to Lulu) today, with just the biographical paragraph on the back.
Z***@none.i2p
2019-10-14 15:03:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
George J. Dance wrote on Mon, 14 October 2019 14:41
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Will Dockery
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Will Dockery
Somewhere in one of these threads I go into detail on how I envision the back cover looking... I see some of those thoughts are indeed here.
I have the links you sent, to Howl https://www.poemsearcher.com/topic/howl#&gid=1&pid=3
and Lunch Poems
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.burnsiderarebooks.com/pictures/140938359_2.jpg?v=1560136353
- basically, one large block of text. The problem for me is knowing what to put into it. I put together a draft earlier, after reading your PPP article, but I think it still needs work.
"Will Dockery was born in Columbus, Georgia, in 1958. Inspired by Poe and the Beatles, and later by Rimbaud and Dylan, he began writing poetry and songs in high school. He has been performing his poetry since the mid-1970s, and publishing it in chapbooks from the early 1980s. He is well known as a street poet in his hometown, winning the 1998 Perky Award for best Columbus poet given by the local entertainment magazine, Playgrounds. (He later wrote for Playgrounds for more than a decade.) He has also been a prolific songwriter, singing and recording his music with local musicians (often under the name Shadowville All-Stars"). Since the turn of the century he has also been posting his poems and songs on the internet, evolving from usenet to myspace, facebook, and most recently instagram."
Getting your thoughts on how I should take it would be helpful, and others' comments could be helpful as well.
I'd add, at the start, something like "Earliest influences were Hank Williams and Popeye..." which led into Edgar Allan Poe and The Beatles.
======================================================
https://vignette.wikia.nocookie.net/pennyspoetry/images/0/0d/Aap15.jpg/revision/latest?cb=20130329124506
Interview with Will Dockery 1996
Will Dockery interview from Playgrounds Magazine 1996 (Written by Frank Saunders)
Psychedelic Whirlwind an interview with Will Dockery by Frank Saunders
Screenshot of "Poet's Corner Profile featuring William Dockery"
Psychedelic Whirlwind Prowling about like a psychedelic cheetah Roving Reporter of seamless nights. -F.S.
FS: Where and when were you born?
WD: La Grange Georgia, 1958.
FS: Who's been your biggest influence in writing poetry?
WD: Alec Lawson. (laughing) At this moment he's a big influence on me.
FS: (laughing) Really?
WD: I don't know if this is going to work now.
FS: Maybe not.
WD: Let's try outside.
We leave Al's apartment and invite everyone down to the courtyard
behind the Loft.*
WD: I think the Southern South of the Sixties influenced me the most. I don't think that Paul Westerberg show is sold out.
FS: You think I could get tickets?
Margie: I might have to work.
Alec: Blow it off.
FS: Sounds good to me.
WD: I gotta get a bead on this interview. Westerberg is a big influence. Let's step back here (pointing to the courtyard). Here is where I get most of my thoughts.
FS: Okay, where were we?
WD: You were asking me about my influences and I was gonna say Kerouac and The Beats but they weren't around then. so I'd have to say Popeye and Hank Williams.
FS: (big laughs and astonishment) What?
WD: Yeah, the '60s Popeye and Hank Williams.
FS: Well yes I loved the '60s Popeye, and Hank Williams is the greatest songwriter ever.
WD: They were a big influence. And who was the guy that played Hank Williams? George Hamilton? George Hamilton playing Hank Williams impersonating Popeye. But I consider myself a Southern poet.
FS: What started your writing?
WD: I would read Poe in Jr. High. I also used to draw a lot of comic strips when I worked at Cartersville Spinning Mill in Jordan City. Then I broke my wrist and George Bush got elected and the mill seemed to shut down simultaneously.
We have an intellectual but irrelevant discussion about our politics.
It adds to the Gestalt of the Will Dockery experience.*
WD: The great songwriters of the 80's Patti Smith, Paul Westerberg and now Pavement influence me a lot. Paul Westerberg has a great line [In Can't Hardly Wait] "Jesus rides beside me and never buys any smokes."
FS: Yeah, I love that line.
WD: ...He rhymes words that other people haven't before. I can't think of any now.
FS: It's rare that you hear rhymes no one has used before.
WD: I attempted some Burroughs cut up work. I haven't done any lately. My scissors are kind of dull.
FS: Some of your lines seem disconnected like that but they work.
WD: Well one time a man was reading over at the Street Preacher's box Mark Coile gave us and it was really garbled. I could only make out a few words here and there - mostly unprintable here in Playgrounds... Hey look, somebody's socks. It's performance art of some kind, I'm sure.
FS: A pair of dirty socks and a red solo cup.
WD: You were talking about the drive between here and LaGrange. I remember making that drive when I was young and hearing "Riders on the Storm" on AM radio. The line "His brain is screaming like a toad."
FS: Yeah, "Take a long holiday. Let your children play."
WD: Yeah I used to get a lot of thoughts drivin' a delivery truck after the mill shut down. You get really close to God behind the wheel of an automobile.
FS: I know I can't help but feel it then. Especially long drives. Speaking of which we are going to Paul Westerberg this weekend.
WD: Yes that's kind of tragic though. I have an extra ticket because the person that I bought it for is... well she won't be going.
FS: Well is there something you would like to say to her maybe in a veiled refernce perhaps?
WD: You should have that in the interview where you ask me that.
FS: Okay.
WD: Okay, I know what to say. I've still got the ticket though the show's over. If you want the ticket - it's better than nothing.
[from Playgrounds Magazine November 1996]
=======================================================
My first question is: what were you guys smoking? My second is: who is Frank Saunders? I see he wrote poetry. Has he published a book (either chap- or full-length)?
The reason I ask is that I'm still looking for quotations for the back cover - not to have 'names' there, but to give more insight on you. And the above one looks good.
"Will Dockery is one of the most interesting people I know. It's a pleasure to call him my friend. He nearly defies description. The closest I've come to an accurate description of Will is this poem I wrote: 'Psychedelic Whirlwind / Prowling about like a psychedelic cheetah / Roving Reporter of seamless nights.'" Frank Saunders, author of ___________
It would be great if you could contact him and see if he's willing to go onto the cover.
Post by Will Dockery
But, otherwise, at first glance, your back cover text looks good, George.... I'll give you more feedback when things even out around here.
I'd still like to add a few quotations to the back cover - I'm thinking Howe and Benders as well as Saunders - and there are probably others, on Usenet, that I haven't found at this time, or have forgotten.
But I don't want to hold the book up for those; they could be added at the same time we add the LOC stuff. I'd like to take the next step (going to Lulu) today, with just the biographical paragraph on the back.
I know Frank and his brother Jon also...........
George J. Dance
2019-10-14 17:39:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Will Dockery
Somewhere in one of these threads I go into detail on how I envision the back cover looking... I see some of those thoughts are indeed here.
I have the links you sent, to Howl https://www.poemsearcher.com/topic/howl#&gid=1&pid=3
and Lunch Poems
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.burnsiderarebooks.com/pictures/140938359_2.jpg?v=1560136353
- basically, one large block of text. The problem for me is knowing what to put into it. I put together a draft earlier, after reading your PPP article, but I think it still needs work.
"Will Dockery was born in Columbus, Georgia, in 1958. Inspired by Poe and the Beatles, and later by Rimbaud and Dylan, he began writing poetry and songs in high school. He has been performing his poetry since the mid-1970s, and publishing it in chapbooks from the early 1980s. He is well known as a street poet in his hometown, winning the 1998 Perky Award for best Columbus poet given by the local entertainment magazine, Playgrounds. (He later wrote for Playgrounds for more than a decade.) He has also been a prolific songwriter, singing and recording his music with local musicians (often under the name Shadowville All-Stars"). Since the turn of the century he has also been posting his poems and songs on the internet, evolving from usenet to myspace, facebook, and most recently instagram."
Getting your thoughts on how I should take it would be helpful, and others' comments could be helpful as well.
I'd add, at the start, something like "Earliest influences were Hank Williams and Popeye..." which led into Edgar Allan Poe and The Beatles.
OK; I find that a bit silly, but, as what I have is so short, I'll add as sentence 2: "He counts among his earliest influences Popeye and Hank Williams." (the order they're in in the interview; I just think that order is more attention-getting).
Post by Will Dockery
======================================================
https://vignette.wikia.nocookie.net/pennyspoetry/images/0/0d/Aap15.jpg/revision/latest?cb=20130329124506
Interview with Will Dockery 1996
Will Dockery interview from Playgrounds Magazine 1996 (Written by Frank Saunders)
Psychedelic Whirlwind an interview with Will Dockery by Frank Saunders
Screenshot of "Poet's Corner Profile featuring William Dockery"
Psychedelic Whirlwind Prowling about like a psychedelic cheetah Roving Reporter of seamless nights. -F.S.
FS: Where and when were you born?
WD: La Grange Georgia, 1958.
FS: Who's been your biggest influence in writing poetry?
WD: Alec Lawson. (laughing) At this moment he's a big influence on me.
FS: (laughing) Really?
WD: I don't know if this is going to work now.
FS: Maybe not.
WD: Let's try outside.
We leave Al's apartment and invite everyone down to the courtyard
behind the Loft.*
WD: I think the Southern South of the Sixties influenced me the most. I don't think that Paul Westerberg show is sold out.
FS: You think I could get tickets?
Margie: I might have to work.
Alec: Blow it off.
FS: Sounds good to me.
WD: I gotta get a bead on this interview. Westerberg is a big influence. Let's step back here (pointing to the courtyard). Here is where I get most of my thoughts.
FS: Okay, where were we?
WD: You were asking me about my influences and I was gonna say Kerouac and The Beats but they weren't around then. so I'd have to say Popeye and Hank Williams.
FS: (big laughs and astonishment) What?
WD: Yeah, the '60s Popeye and Hank Williams.
FS: Well yes I loved the '60s Popeye, and Hank Williams is the greatest songwriter ever.
WD: They were a big influence. And who was the guy that played Hank Williams? George Hamilton? George Hamilton playing Hank Williams impersonating Popeye. But I consider myself a Southern poet.
FS: What started your writing?
WD: I would read Poe in Jr. High. I also used to draw a lot of comic strips when I worked at Cartersville Spinning Mill in Jordan City. Then I broke my wrist and George Bush got elected and the mill seemed to shut down simultaneously.
We have an intellectual but irrelevant discussion about our politics.
It adds to the Gestalt of the Will Dockery experience.*
WD: The great songwriters of the 80's Patti Smith, Paul Westerberg and now Pavement influence me a lot. Paul Westerberg has a great line [In Can't Hardly Wait] "Jesus rides beside me and never buys any smokes."
FS: Yeah, I love that line.
WD: ...He rhymes words that other people haven't before. I can't think of any now.
FS: It's rare that you hear rhymes no one has used before.
WD: I attempted some Burroughs cut up work. I haven't done any lately. My scissors are kind of dull.
FS: Some of your lines seem disconnected like that but they work.
WD: Well one time a man was reading over at the Street Preacher's box Mark Coile gave us and it was really garbled. I could only make out a few words here and there - mostly unprintable here in Playgrounds... Hey look, somebody's socks. It's performance art of some kind, I'm sure.
FS: A pair of dirty socks and a red solo cup.
WD: You were talking about the drive between here and LaGrange. I remember making that drive when I was young and hearing "Riders on the Storm" on AM radio. The line "His brain is screaming like a toad."
FS: Yeah, "Take a long holiday. Let your children play."
WD: Yeah I used to get a lot of thoughts drivin' a delivery truck after the mill shut down. You get really close to God behind the wheel of an automobile.
FS: I know I can't help but feel it then. Especially long drives. Speaking of which we are going to Paul Westerberg this weekend.
WD: Yes that's kind of tragic though. I have an extra ticket because the person that I bought it for is... well she won't be going.
FS: Well is there something you would like to say to her maybe in a veiled refernce perhaps?
WD: You should have that in the interview where you ask me that.
FS: Okay.
WD: Okay, I know what to say. I've still got the ticket though the show's over. If you want the ticket - it's better than nothing.
[from Playgrounds Magazine November 1996]
=======================================================
But, otherwise, at first glance, your back cover text looks good, George... I'll give you more feedback when things even out around here.
I would like your feedback on MP's rewrite and suggestions (in particular, eliminating references to your chapbook publishing, Playgrounds writing, and internet activity - which of those 3 you want mentioned, which you think can go). That won't hold me up, if you're too busy to respond today, but if I can get your feedback it would help, of course.
Michael Pendragon
2019-10-14 17:48:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Will Dockery
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Will Dockery
Somewhere in one of these threads I go into detail on how I envision the back cover looking... I see some of those thoughts are indeed here.
I have the links you sent, to Howl https://www.poemsearcher.com/topic/howl#&gid=1&pid=3
and Lunch Poems
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.burnsiderarebooks.com/pictures/140938359_2.jpg?v=1560136353
- basically, one large block of text. The problem for me is knowing what to put into it. I put together a draft earlier, after reading your PPP article, but I think it still needs work.
"Will Dockery was born in Columbus, Georgia, in 1958. Inspired by Poe and the Beatles, and later by Rimbaud and Dylan, he began writing poetry and songs in high school. He has been performing his poetry since the mid-1970s, and publishing it in chapbooks from the early 1980s. He is well known as a street poet in his hometown, winning the 1998 Perky Award for best Columbus poet given by the local entertainment magazine, Playgrounds. (He later wrote for Playgrounds for more than a decade.) He has also been a prolific songwriter, singing and recording his music with local musicians (often under the name Shadowville All-Stars"). Since the turn of the century he has also been posting his poems and songs on the internet, evolving from usenet to myspace, facebook, and most recently instagram."
Getting your thoughts on how I should take it would be helpful, and others' comments could be helpful as well.
I'd add, at the start, something like "Earliest influences were Hank Williams and Popeye..." which led into Edgar Allan Poe and The Beatles.
OK; I find that a bit silly, but, as what I have is so short, I'll add as sentence 2: "He counts among his earliest influences Popeye and Hank Williams." (the order they're in in the interview; I just think that order is more attention-getting).
OMFG!
Will Dockery
2019-10-14 18:22:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Will Dockery
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Will Dockery
Somewhere in one of these threads I go into detail on how I envision the back cover looking... I see some of those thoughts are indeed here.
I have the links you sent, to Howl https://www.poemsearcher.com/topic/howl#&gid=1&pid=3
and Lunch Poems
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.burnsiderarebooks.com/pictures/140938359_2.jpg?v=1560136353
- basically, one large block of text. The problem for me is knowing what to put into it. I put together a draft earlier, after reading your PPP article, but I think it still needs work.
"Will Dockery was born in Columbus, Georgia, in 1958. Inspired by Poe and the Beatles, and later by Rimbaud and Dylan, he began writing poetry and songs in high school. He has been performing his poetry since the mid-1970s, and publishing it in chapbooks from the early 1980s. He is well known as a street poet in his hometown, winning the 1998 Perky Award for best Columbus poet given by the local entertainment magazine, Playgrounds. (He later wrote for Playgrounds for more than a decade.) He has also been a prolific songwriter, singing and recording his music with local musicians (often under the name Shadowville All-Stars"). Since the turn of the century he has also been posting his poems and songs on the internet, evolving from usenet to myspace, facebook, and most recently instagram."
Getting your thoughts on how I should take it would be helpful, and others' comments could be helpful as well.
I'd add, at the start, something like "Earliest influences were Hank Williams and Popeye..." which led into Edgar Allan Poe and The Beatles.
OK; I find that a bit silly,
It would be too difficult to explain, also... best to leave that out, I reckon.
Post by George J. Dance
but, as what I have is so short, I'll add as sentence 2: "He counts among his earliest influences Popeye and Hank Williams." (the order they're in in the interview; I just think that order is more attention-getting).
Post by Will Dockery
======================================================
https://vignette.wikia.nocookie.net/pennyspoetry/images/0/0d/Aap15.jpg/revision/latest?cb=20130329124506
Interview with Will Dockery 1996
Will Dockery interview from Playgrounds Magazine 1996 (Written by Frank Saunders)
Psychedelic Whirlwind an interview with Will Dockery by Frank Saunders
Screenshot of "Poet's Corner Profile featuring William Dockery"
Psychedelic Whirlwind Prowling about like a psychedelic cheetah Roving Reporter of seamless nights. -F.S.
FS: Where and when were you born?
WD: La Grange Georgia, 1958.
FS: Who's been your biggest influence in writing poetry?
WD: Alec Lawson. (laughing) At this moment he's a big influence on me.
FS: (laughing) Really?
WD: I don't know if this is going to work now.
FS: Maybe not.
WD: Let's try outside.
We leave Al's apartment and invite everyone down to the courtyard
behind the Loft.*
WD: I think the Southern South of the Sixties influenced me the most. I don't think that Paul Westerberg show is sold out.
FS: You think I could get tickets?
Margie: I might have to work.
Alec: Blow it off.
FS: Sounds good to me.
WD: I gotta get a bead on this interview. Westerberg is a big influence. Let's step back here (pointing to the courtyard). Here is where I get most of my thoughts.
FS: Okay, where were we?
WD: You were asking me about my influences and I was gonna say Kerouac and The Beats but they weren't around then. so I'd have to say Popeye and Hank Williams.
FS: (big laughs and astonishment) What?
WD: Yeah, the '60s Popeye and Hank Williams.
FS: Well yes I loved the '60s Popeye, and Hank Williams is the greatest songwriter ever.
WD: They were a big influence. And who was the guy that played Hank Williams? George Hamilton? George Hamilton playing Hank Williams impersonating Popeye. But I consider myself a Southern poet.
FS: What started your writing?
WD: I would read Poe in Jr. High. I also used to draw a lot of comic strips when I worked at Cartersville Spinning Mill in Jordan City. Then I broke my wrist and George Bush got elected and the mill seemed to shut down simultaneously.
We have an intellectual but irrelevant discussion about our politics.
It adds to the Gestalt of the Will Dockery experience.*
WD: The great songwriters of the 80's Patti Smith, Paul Westerberg and now Pavement influence me a lot. Paul Westerberg has a great line [In Can't Hardly Wait] "Jesus rides beside me and never buys any smokes."
FS: Yeah, I love that line.
WD: ...He rhymes words that other people haven't before. I can't think of any now.
FS: It's rare that you hear rhymes no one has used before.
WD: I attempted some Burroughs cut up work. I haven't done any lately. My scissors are kind of dull.
FS: Some of your lines seem disconnected like that but they work.
WD: Well one time a man was reading over at the Street Preacher's box Mark Coile gave us and it was really garbled. I could only make out a few words here and there - mostly unprintable here in Playgrounds... Hey look, somebody's socks. It's performance art of some kind, I'm sure.
FS: A pair of dirty socks and a red solo cup.
WD: You were talking about the drive between here and LaGrange. I remember making that drive when I was young and hearing "Riders on the Storm" on AM radio. The line "His brain is screaming like a toad."
FS: Yeah, "Take a long holiday. Let your children play."
WD: Yeah I used to get a lot of thoughts drivin' a delivery truck after the mill shut down. You get really close to God behind the wheel of an automobile.
FS: I know I can't help but feel it then. Especially long drives. Speaking of which we are going to Paul Westerberg this weekend.
WD: Yes that's kind of tragic though. I have an extra ticket because the person that I bought it for is... well she won't be going.
FS: Well is there something you would like to say to her maybe in a veiled refernce perhaps?
WD: You should have that in the interview where you ask me that.
FS: Okay.
WD: Okay, I know what to say. I've still got the ticket though the show's over. If you want the ticket - it's better than nothing.
[from Playgrounds Magazine November 1996]
=======================================================
But, otherwise, at first glance, your back cover text looks good, George... I'll give you more feedback when things even out around here.
I would like your feedback on MP's rewrite and suggestions (in particular, eliminating references to your chapbook publishing, Playgrounds writing, and internet activity - which of those 3 you want mentioned, which you think can go). That won't hold me up, if you're too busy to respond today, but if I can get your feedback it would help, of course.
I began reading Pendragon's post, and agree "Bob Dylan" should be used rather than just "Dylan".

His misrepresentation of "Street Poet" is also noted.

https://www.google.com/search?safe=off&rlz=1CAPPDO_enUS742US742&sxsrf=ACYBGNSktUt2VH5cmGjisWx30l4CWI0tqQ%3A1571076537863&ei=ubmkXa-cNOehggeCmLXwDA&q=street+poet+definition&oq=%22street+poet%22+&gs_l=psy-ab.1.5.0l4j0i22i30l3j0i22i10i30j0i22i30l2.41327.43622..49281...0.0..0.226.1302.0j6j2......0....1..gws-wiz.......35i302i39.EGLKBBta6-U

"street poet definition" About 17,700,000 results (0.66 seconds)
George J. Dance
2019-10-14 19:20:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Will Dockery
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Will Dockery
Somewhere in one of these threads I go into detail on how I envision the back cover looking... I see some of those thoughts are indeed here.
I have the links you sent, to Howl https://www.poemsearcher.com/topic/howl#&gid=1&pid=3
and Lunch Poems
Post by Will Dockery
https://www.burnsiderarebooks.com/pictures/140938359_2.jpg?v=1560136353
- basically, one large block of text. The problem for me is knowing what to put into it. I put together a draft earlier, after reading your PPP article, but I think it still needs work.
"Will Dockery was born in Columbus, Georgia, in 1958. Inspired by Poe and the Beatles, and later by Rimbaud and Dylan, he began writing poetry and songs in high school. He has been performing his poetry since the mid-1970s, and publishing it in chapbooks from the early 1980s. He is well known as a street poet in his hometown, winning the 1998 Perky Award for best Columbus poet given by the local entertainment magazine, Playgrounds. (He later wrote for Playgrounds for more than a decade.) He has also been a prolific songwriter, singing and recording his music with local musicians (often under the name Shadowville All-Stars"). Since the turn of the century he has also been posting his poems and songs on the internet, evolving from usenet to myspace, facebook, and most recently instagram."
Getting your thoughts on how I should take it would be helpful, and others' comments could be helpful as well.
I'd add, at the start, something like "Earliest influences were Hank Williams and Popeye..." which led into Edgar Allan Poe and The Beatles.
OK; I find that a bit silly,
It would be too difficult to explain, also... best to leave that out, I reckon.
Post by George J. Dance
but, as what I have is so short, I'll add as sentence 2: "He counts among his earliest influences Popeye and Hank Williams." (the order they're in in the interview; I just think that order is more attention-getting).
Post by Will Dockery
======================================================
https://vignette.wikia.nocookie.net/pennyspoetry/images/0/0d/Aap15.jpg/revision/latest?cb=20130329124506
Interview with Will Dockery 1996
Will Dockery interview from Playgrounds Magazine 1996 (Written by Frank Saunders)
Psychedelic Whirlwind an interview with Will Dockery by Frank Saunders
Screenshot of "Poet's Corner Profile featuring William Dockery"
Psychedelic Whirlwind Prowling about like a psychedelic cheetah Roving Reporter of seamless nights. -F.S.
FS: Where and when were you born?
WD: La Grange Georgia, 1958.
FS: Who's been your biggest influence in writing poetry?
WD: Alec Lawson. (laughing) At this moment he's a big influence on me.
FS: (laughing) Really?
WD: I don't know if this is going to work now.
FS: Maybe not.
WD: Let's try outside.
We leave Al's apartment and invite everyone down to the courtyard
behind the Loft.*
WD: I think the Southern South of the Sixties influenced me the most. I don't think that Paul Westerberg show is sold out.
FS: You think I could get tickets?
Margie: I might have to work.
Alec: Blow it off.
FS: Sounds good to me.
WD: I gotta get a bead on this interview. Westerberg is a big influence. Let's step back here (pointing to the courtyard). Here is where I get most of my thoughts.
FS: Okay, where were we?
WD: You were asking me about my influences and I was gonna say Kerouac and The Beats but they weren't around then. so I'd have to say Popeye and Hank Williams.
FS: (big laughs and astonishment) What?
WD: Yeah, the '60s Popeye and Hank Williams.
FS: Well yes I loved the '60s Popeye, and Hank Williams is the greatest songwriter ever.
WD: They were a big influence. And who was the guy that played Hank Williams? George Hamilton? George Hamilton playing Hank Williams impersonating Popeye. But I consider myself a Southern poet.
FS: What started your writing?
WD: I would read Poe in Jr. High. I also used to draw a lot of comic strips when I worked at Cartersville Spinning Mill in Jordan City. Then I broke my wrist and George Bush got elected and the mill seemed to shut down simultaneously.
We have an intellectual but irrelevant discussion about our politics.
It adds to the Gestalt of the Will Dockery experience.*
WD: The great songwriters of the 80's Patti Smith, Paul Westerberg and now Pavement influence me a lot. Paul Westerberg has a great line [In Can't Hardly Wait] "Jesus rides beside me and never buys any smokes."
FS: Yeah, I love that line.
WD: ...He rhymes words that other people haven't before. I can't think of any now.
FS: It's rare that you hear rhymes no one has used before.
WD: I attempted some Burroughs cut up work. I haven't done any lately. My scissors are kind of dull.
FS: Some of your lines seem disconnected like that but they work.
WD: Well one time a man was reading over at the Street Preacher's box Mark Coile gave us and it was really garbled. I could only make out a few words here and there - mostly unprintable here in Playgrounds... Hey look, somebody's socks. It's performance art of some kind, I'm sure.
FS: A pair of dirty socks and a red solo cup.
WD: You were talking about the drive between here and LaGrange. I remember making that drive when I was young and hearing "Riders on the Storm" on AM radio. The line "His brain is screaming like a toad."
FS: Yeah, "Take a long holiday. Let your children play."
WD: Yeah I used to get a lot of thoughts drivin' a delivery truck after the mill shut down. You get really close to God behind the wheel of an automobile.
FS: I know I can't help but feel it then. Especially long drives. Speaking of which we are going to Paul Westerberg this weekend.
WD: Yes that's kind of tragic though. I have an extra ticket because the person that I bought it for is... well she won't be going.
FS: Well is there something you would like to say to her maybe in a veiled refernce perhaps?
WD: You should have that in the interview where you ask me that.
FS: Okay.
WD: Okay, I know what to say. I've still got the ticket though the show's over. If you want the ticket - it's better than nothing.
[from Playgrounds Magazine November 1996]
=======================================================
But, otherwise, at first glance, your back cover text looks good, George... I'll give you more feedback when things even out around here.
I would like your feedback on MP's rewrite and suggestions (in particular, eliminating references to your chapbook publishing, Playgrounds writing, and internet activity - which of those 3 you want mentioned, which you think can go). That won't hold me up, if you're too busy to respond today, but if I can get your feedback it would help, of course.
I began reading Pendragon's post, and agree "Bob Dylan" should be used rather than just "Dylan".
His misrepresentation of "Street Poet" is also noted.
https://www.google.com/search?safe=off&rlz=1CAPPDO_enUS742US742&sxsrf=ACYBGNSktUt2VH5cmGjisWx30l4CWI0tqQ%3A1571076537863&ei=ubmkXa-cNOehggeCmLXwDA&q=street+poet+definition&oq=%22street+poet%22+&gs_l=psy-ab.1.5.0l4j0i22i30l3j0i22i10i30j0i22i30l2.41327.43622..49281...0.0..0.226.1302.0j6j2......0....1..gws-wiz.......35i302i39.EGLKBBta6-U
"street poet definition" About 17,700,000 results (0.66 seconds)
Still, I notice the other terms - slam poet, spoken word poet, and performance poet. Since I'd changed "performing his poetry" as a result of MP's alternate wording, I decided to use "performance poet" here rather than "street poet."

Here's the blurb as it looks right now.

Will Dockery was born in Columbus, Georgia, in 1958. Inspired by the
poetry of Poe and Rimbaud and the music of the Beatles and Bob Dylan, he
began writing poetry and songs in high school. He has been performing his
songs (with his own project, the Shadowville All-Stars) and
giving poetry recitals since the mid-70s. He is a well known performance
poet, and a past recipient of Playgrounds magazine's Perky Award for
poetry. He later wrote a column for Playgrounds for more than a decade.

This Selected Poems brings together poetry and song lyrics from all five
decades of Dockery's career, to give an intimate look at the man and his
work."
Hieronymous Corey
2019-10-14 19:24:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
This is bad, very, very bad.
George J. Dance
2019-10-14 19:33:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Hieronymous Corey
This is bad, very, very bad.
"This is bad, very, very bad"?
Hieronymous Corey
2019-10-14 19:47:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
"Inspired by the poetry of Poe and Rimbaud, and the music of the Beatles and Bob Dylan,
Will Dockery began writing in high school, and has been performing and giving recitals
since the mid-70s. Will is well known locally for his performance poetry, as leader of the band
The Shadowville Allstars, and as a recipient of Playground Magazine's annual Perky Award
for poetry. Dockery is single, and lives with his brother in Columbus, Ga.

'Selected Poems' brings together poetry and song lyrics from Mr. Dockery's career thus far
to give an intimate look at the man and his work."
Michael Pendragon
2019-10-14 19:53:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Hieronymous Corey
"Inspired by the poetry of Poe and Rimbaud, and the music of the Beatles and Bob Dylan,
Will Dockery began writing in high school, and has been performing and giving recitals
since the mid-70s. Will is well known locally for his performance poetry, as leader of the band
The Shadowville Allstars, and as a recipient of Playground Magazine's annual Perky Award
for poetry. Dockery is single, and lives with his brother in Columbus, Ga.
He likes steak dinners, moonlight strolls on the Riverwalk, and giggling at homosexual couples in front of gay bars. He is a non-smoker/teetotaler, and seeks same.
Post by Hieronymous Corey
'Selected Poems' brings together poetry and song lyrics from Mr. Dockery's career thus far
to give an intimate look at the man and his work."
George J. Dance
2019-10-12 15:44:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
So far, so good, George... will have a last look and we can get this show on the road.
;)
Ping again - I need a credit for the front cover.
G***@none.i2p
2019-10-13 15:16:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
George J. Dance wrote on Wed, 09 October 2019 20:21
Post by George J. Dance
Last night I added 2 more poems to the book, "Silver Glassy Rain" and "Corning Town," and considered it done. However, due to a problem with the interline spacing which I corrected today, both poems each turned out to be 3 pages long rather than the 4 I'd thought; meaning that I had to add 2 new single-pagers to keep the placement of the other poems unchanged.
I finally picked "Coil" and "Shadowville," using them to frame the descent into Hell sequence that makes up the bulk of part 2. That brings us to 60 poems (not counting the dedication), still on 122 pages. (I'll post the table of contents in this thread, if there's a demand for it.) I'd call that a wrap.
Accordingly, I'd like to make the pdf tonight and email it to you tomorrow.
Seems like an interesting collection....
Will Dockery
2019-10-13 15:20:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by George J. Dance
Last night I added 2 more poems to the book, "Silver Glassy Rain" and "Corning Town," and considered it done. However, due to a problem with the interline spacing which I corrected today, both poems each turned out to be 3 pages long rather than the 4 I'd thought; meaning that I had to add 2 new single-pagers to keep the placement of the other poems unchanged.
I finally picked "Coil" and "Shadowville," using them to frame the descent into Hell sequence that makes up the bulk of part 2. That brings us to 60 poems (not counting the dedication), still on 122 pages. (I'll post the table of contents in this thread, if there's a demand for it.) I'd call that a wrap.
Accordingly, I'd like to make the pdf tonight and email it to you tomorrow.
I'm good with this, because I could over-think it until Doomsday.

My email is

***@gmail.com

Don't use any others...

;)
Hieronymous Corey
2019-10-13 16:55:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
If it's not for you, it's not for you.
Just be glad I didn't post it for
you to read, and be bored. LOL
Will Dockery
2019-10-13 17:29:17 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Hieronymous Corey
If it's not for you, it's not for you.
Just be glad I didn't post it for
you to read, and be bored. LOL
So why are you trolling my thread with it?
Hieronymous Corey
2019-10-13 17:02:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
How's lunch? LOL
Conley Brothers
2019-10-13 20:46:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Hieronymous Corey
How's lunch? LOL
Sulzbach's slop lunch is free to him and paid for and prepared by others.
Z***@none.i2p
2019-10-13 23:23:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Over two thousand dollars dos seem a lot, my question is how "ME" has dreamed up such a figure........?

Perhaps G.D. can explain.....?
Me
2019-10-13 23:30:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Z***@none.i2p
Over two thousand dollars dos seem a lot, my question is how "ME" has dreamed up such a figure........?
Perhaps G.D. can explain.....?
Over two thousand dollars seems like a lot of money to get a book published? You’ve never had many books published have you, zid,will?
Will Dockery
2019-10-13 23:38:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Me
Over two thousand dollars seems like a lot of money to get a book published? You’ve never had many books published
Besides small press work, the closest I came was the full scale release of the Shadowville Speedway CD:

https://artemisrecords.net/wp/product/will-dockery-shadowville-speedway-2/
Me
2019-10-13 23:48:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Me
Over two thousand dollars seems like a lot of money to get a book published? You’ve never had many books published
https://artemisrecords.net/wp/product/will-dockery-shadowville-speedway-2/
How many were sold?
Me
2019-10-13 23:51:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Me
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Me
Over two thousand dollars seems like a lot of money to get a book published? You’ve never had many books published
https://artemisrecords.net/wp/product/will-dockery-shadowville-speedway-2/
How many were sold?
And can it be confirmed by artemis records?
Will Dockery
2019-10-14 01:16:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Me
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Me
Over two thousand dollars seems like a lot of money to get a book published? You’ve never had many books published
https://artemisrecords.net/wp/product/will-dockery-shadowville-speedway-2/
How many were sold?
You know I don't answer private/personal questions like that here, "Me".

;)
ME
2019-10-14 01:43:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Me
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Me
Over two thousand dollars seems like a lot of money to get a book published? You’ve never had many books published
https://artemisrecords.net/wp/product/will-dockery-shadowville-speedway-2/
How many were sold?
You know I don't answer private/personal questions like that here, "Me".
;)
A full scale release of a CD wouldn’t be personal/private information, would it?
Z***@none.i2p
2019-10-14 02:07:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
ME[8
wrote on Mon, 14 October 2019 01:43]
A full scale release of a CD wouldn't be personal/private information, would it?
You can read all about that here:

https://artemisrecords.net/wp/product/will-dockery-shadowville-speedway-2/
Z***@none.i2p
2019-10-14 01:44:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
The Real Will Dockery wrote on Mon, 14 October 2019 01:16
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Me
Post by Will Dockery
Over two thousand dollars seems like a lot of money to get a book published? You've never had many books published
https://artemisrecords.net/wp/product/will-dockery-shadowville-speedway-2/
How many were sold?
You know I don't answer private/personal questions like that here, "Me".
;)
Damn..........

Everyone here knows that by now Doc........
ME
2019-10-14 02:00:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Z***@none.i2p
The Real Will Dockery wrote on Mon, 14 October 2019 01:16
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Me
Post by Will Dockery
Over two thousand dollars seems like a lot of money to get a book published? You've never had many books published
https://artemisrecords.net/wp/product/will-dockery-shadowville-speedway-2/
How many were sold?
You know I don't answer private/personal questions like that here, "Me".
;)
Damn..........
Everyone here knows that by now Doc........
No they don’t zid. Why not let doc speak for himself on this one.
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