Discussion:
Angel of Esquiline Hill / Ping: George Dance
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Will Dockery
2018-07-27 12:54:43 UTC
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It's painfully obvious that your poem was "inspired," at least in part, from "Suzanne Takes You Down." In fact, I'd venture to guess that the vast majority of your poems are derived from rock or folkie songs (like that "Hotel California" clone)
Which you were also mistaken about, and I explained to you nearly endlessly.
I'm just not well-versed enough in late 60s/early 70s music to pick up on them all.
Seriously, nothing like that is there, although I do love Leonard Cohen's poetry, this is working in a very different area than "Suzanne"... ask somebody who would actually know, like George Dance.



Angel of Esquiline Hill
Poem by Will Dockery
Music by Rob Wright and Jack Snipe.

Again, I love the Leonard Cohen poetry, but this poem is operating on a whole other level, one personal to me and my world, as is "Esquiline Hill" unique to me and the setting for my poetry, Shadowville.

So, Ping; George Dance.

:)
Beach Comber
2018-07-28 07:05:03 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
It's painfully obvious that your poem was "inspired," at least in part, from "Suzanne Takes You Down." In fact, I'd venture to guess that the vast majority of your poems are derived from rock or folkie songs (like that "Hotel California" clone)
Which you were also mistaken about, and I explained to you nearly endlessly.
I'm just not well-versed enough in late 60s/early 70s music to pick up on them all.
Seriously, nothing like that is there, although I do love Leonard Cohen's poetry, this is working in a very different area than "Suzanne"... ask somebody who would actually know, like George Dance.
http://youtu.be/st3dbWFKpB8
Angel of Esquiline Hill
Poem by Will Dockery
Music by Rob Wright and Jack Snipe.
Again, I love the Leonard Cohen poetry, but this poem is operating on a whole other level, one personal to me and my world, as is "Esquiline Hill" unique to me and the setting for my poetry, Shadowville.
So, Ping; George Dance.
:)
Love some Leonard Cohen and it ndoes sound like him Doc.....
Will Dockery
2018-07-28 18:45:54 UTC
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Tossing Dance under the bus? Damn, you must've reached your desperation point.
Wrong.
It's painfully obvious that your poem was "inspired," at least in part, from "Suzanne Takes You Down." In fact, I'd venture to guess that the vast majority of your poems are derived from rock or folkie songs (like that "Hotel California" clone)
Which you were also mistaken about.
I'm just not well-versed enough in late 60s/early 70s music to pick up on them all.
Seriously, nothing like that is there, although I do love Leonard Cohen's poetry, this is working in a very different area than "Suzanne"... ask somebody who would actually know, like George Dance.
http://youtu.be/st3dbWFKpB8
Angel of Esquiline Hill
Poem by Will Dockery
Music by Rob Wright and Jack Snipe.
Again, I love the Cohen, but this poem is operating on a whole other level, one personal to me and my world.
:)
The only similarities that I can see are that (1) both poems are about a woman, and (2) they both include the phrase "take you down".
I'd reject the second bit of evidence out of hand. I've used the phrase "I will take you down" in a poem myself, and in that case (unlike some times when I've used a Cohen phrase) there was no reference to his poem, not even conscious thought - any more than (I suspect) in the case of Chris Brown's "Take You Down".
Or even John Lennon's "Strawberry Fields"...
Bean Counter
2018-07-31 06:43:09 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Tossing Dance under the bus? Damn, you must've reached your desperation point.
Wrong.
It's painfully obvious that your poem was "inspired," at least in part, from "Suzanne Takes You Down." In fact, I'd venture to guess that the vast majority of your poems are derived from rock or folkie songs (like that "Hotel California" clone)
Which you were also mistaken about.
I'm just not well-versed enough in late 60s/early 70s music to pick up on them all.
Seriously, nothing like that is there, although I do love Leonard Cohen's poetry, this is working in a very different area than "Suzanne"... ask somebody who would actually know, like George Dance.
http://youtu.be/st3dbWFKpB8
Angel of Esquiline Hill
Poem by Will Dockery
Music by Rob Wright and Jack Snipe.
Again, I love the Cohen, but this poem is operating on a whole other level, one personal to me and my world.
:)
The only similarities that I can see are that (1) both poems are about a woman, and (2) they both include the phrase "take you down".
I'd reject the second bit of evidence out of hand. I've used the phrase "I will take you down" in a poem myself, and in that case (unlike some times when I've used a Cohen phrase) there was no reference to his poem, not even conscious thought - any more than (I suspect) in the case of Chris Brown's "Take You Down".
Or even John Lennon's "Strawberry Fields"...
Agreed it is simple lo9gicalness you see you see....
Will Dockery
2018-08-01 18:01:40 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
Seriously, nothing like that is there, although I do love Leonard Cohen's poetry, this is working in a very different area than "Suzanne"... ask somebody who would actually know, like George Dance.
http://youtu.be/st3dbWFKpB8
Angel of Esquiline Hill
Poem by Will Dockery
Music by Rob Wright and Jack Snipe.
Again, I love the Cohen, but this poem is operating on a whole other level, one personal to me and my world.
:)
The only similarities that I can see are that (1) both poems are about a woman, and (2) they both include the phrase "take you down".
I'd reject the second bit of evidence out of hand. I've used the phrase "I will take you down" in a poem myself, and in that case (unlike some times when I've used a Cohen phrase) there was no reference to his poem, not even conscious thought - any more than (I suspect) in the case of Chris Brown's "Take You Down".
Or even John Lennon's "Strawberry Fields"...
Agreed it is simple logicalness you see you see....
You figured it out, I see...
George J. Dance
2018-08-01 19:03:18 UTC
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Post by Bean Counter
Post by Will Dockery
Tossing Dance under the bus? Damn, you must've reached your desperation point.
Wrong.
It's painfully obvious that your poem was "inspired," at least in part, from "Suzanne Takes You Down." In fact, I'd venture to guess that the vast majority of your poems are derived from rock or folkie songs (like that "Hotel California" clone)
Which you were also mistaken about.
I'm just not well-versed enough in late 60s/early 70s music to pick up on them all.
Seriously, nothing like that is there, although I do love Leonard Cohen's poetry, this is working in a very different area than "Suzanne"... ask somebody who would actually know, like George Dance.
http://youtu.be/st3dbWFKpB8
Angel of Esquiline Hill
Poem by Will Dockery
Music by Rob Wright and Jack Snipe.
Again, I love the Cohen, but this poem is operating on a whole other level, one personal to me and my world.
:)
The only similarities that I can see are that (1) both poems are about a woman, and (2) they both include the phrase "take you down".
I'd reject the second bit of evidence out of hand. I've used the phrase "I will take you down" in a poem myself, and in that case (unlike some times when I've used a Cohen phrase) there was no reference to his poem, not even conscious thought - any more than (I suspect) in the case of Chris Brown's "Take You Down".
Or even John Lennon's "Strawberry Fields"...
Agreed it is simple lo9gicalness you see you see....
That is an interesting conjecture; Cohen might have got the "takes you down" phrase from Lennon's "take you down".
Will Dockery
2018-08-03 22:17:47 UTC
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Post by George J. Dance
Post by Will Dockery
Tossing Dance under the bus?
Wrong.
It's painfully obvious that your poem was "inspired," at least in part, from "Suzanne Takes You Down." In fact, I'd venture to guess that the vast majority of your poems are derived from rock or folkie songs (like that "Hotel California" clone)
Which you were also mistaken about.
I'm just not well-versed enough in late 60s/early 70s music to pick up on them all.
Seriously, nothing like that is there, although I do love Leonard Cohen's poetry, this is working in a very different area than "Suzanne"... ask somebody who would actually know, like George Dance.
http://youtu.be/st3dbWFKpB8
Angel of Esquiline Hill
Poem by Will Dockery
Music by Rob Wright and Jack Snipe.
Again, I love the Cohen, but this poem is operating on a whole other level, one personal to me and my world.
:)
The only similarities that I can see are that (1) both poems are about a woman, and (2) they both include the phrase "take you down".
I'd reject the second bit of evidence out of hand. I've used the phrase "I will take you down" in a poem myself, and in that case (unlike some times when I've used a Cohen phrase) there was no reference to his poem, not even conscious thought - any more than (I suspect) in the case of Chris Brown's "Take You Down".
Or even John Lennon's "Strawberry Fields"...
Agreed it is simple logicalness you see you see....
That is an interesting conjecture; Cohen might have got the "takes you down" phrase from Lennon's "take you down".
Yes, they were current at exactly the same time period.
Will Dockery
2018-08-14 13:59:16 UTC
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Post by George J. Dance
Post by Bean Counter
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Will Dockery
Seriously, nothing like that is there, although I do love Leonard Cohen's poetry, this is working in a very different area than "Suzanne"... ask somebody who would actually know, like George Dance.
http://youtu.be/st3dbWFKpB8
Angel of Esquiline Hill
Poem by Will Dockery
Music by Rob Wright and Jack Snipe.
Again, I love the Cohen, but this poem is operating on a whole other level, one personal to me and my world.
:)
The only similarities that I can see are that (1) both poems are about a woman, and (2) they both include the phrase "take you down".
I'd reject the second bit of evidence out of hand. I've used the phrase "I will take you down" in a poem myself, and in that case (unlike some times when I've used a Cohen phrase) there was no reference to his poem, not even conscious thought - any more than (I suspect) in the case of Chris Brown's "Take You Down".
Or even John Lennon's "Strawberry Fields"...
Agreed it is simple lo9gicalness you see you see....
That is an interesting conjecture; Cohen might have got the "takes you down" phrase from Lennon's "take you down".
Something never discussed anywhere else, as far as I've seen, either.
Will Dockery
2018-08-20 16:27:50 UTC
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Pendragon, in another thread you claimed that I had quoted Leonard Cohen
"several" times in this poem, which is incorrect... the closest you say I
have come to quoting Cohen is not even correct, since "Let me take you down"
doesn't even appear in Cohen's poetry.

Just to set the record straight.

;)
Michael Pendragon
2018-08-20 16:29:34 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Pendragon, in another thread you claimed that I had quoted Leonard Cohen
"several" times in this poem, which is incorrect... the closest you say I
have come to quoting Cohen is not even correct, since "Let me take you down"
doesn't even appear in Cohen's poetry.
Just to set the record straight.
As for setting the record straight, what I actually said was "several themes and motifs." I realize now that you don't understand what the latter is. Start googling.
Will Dockery
2018-08-20 16:47:21 UTC
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Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Pendragon, in another thread you claimed that I had quoted Leonard Cohen
"several" times in this poem, which is incorrect... the closest you say I
have come to quoting Cohen is not even correct, since "Let me take you down"
doesn't even appear in Cohen's poetry.
Just to set the record straight.
As for setting the record straight, what I actually said was "several themes and motifs."
Either way, it simply isn't true, the poem is not inspired or based on any Leonard Cohen poetry, that's just a simple fact.

HTH & HAND.

:)
Michael Pendragon
2018-08-20 17:06:00 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Pendragon, in another thread you claimed that I had quoted Leonard Cohen
"several" times in this poem, which is incorrect... the closest you say I
have come to quoting Cohen is not even correct, since "Let me take you down"
doesn't even appear in Cohen's poetry.
Just to set the record straight.
As for setting the record straight, what I actually said was "several themes and motifs."
Either way, it simply isn't true, the poem is not inspired or based on any Leonard Cohen poetry, that's just a simple fact.
Do you prefer "plagiarized?"
Will Dockery
2018-08-20 17:18:09 UTC
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That would be a lie, Pendragon.

My poem is completely original, that's why we're arguing, remember?

:)
Michael Pendragon
2018-08-20 18:39:19 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
That would be a lie, Pendragon.
My poem is completely original, that's why we're arguing, remember?
Will's writing second-hand prose,
Second-hand prose,
Prose copped from Cohen
And God only knows
Who else Will chose
To steal his second-hand prose,
Will second-hands from
His head to his toes.

*With apologies to Grant Clarke
Will Dockery
2018-08-20 22:55:39 UTC
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Post by Michael Pendragon
Prose copped from Cohen
That is bullshit, Pendragon, as you've been told a half-dozen or more times, already.
Michael Pendragon
2018-08-21 00:22:02 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Prose copped from Cohen
That is bullshit, Pendragon, as you've been told a half-dozen or more times, already.
Second-hand pomes
Will's writing second-hand pomes
Combing the pages
Of old Beatnik tomes --
Ginsberg and Cohen
Will gloms from Ginsberg and Cohen
Dylan, O'Hara, Bukowski, McKuen
Second-hand pomes
Will posts his second-hand pomes
Pomes about hookers in old hotel rooms --
Wel-come
to thee world
of Will Dock-ery ...

Such
Me
2018-08-21 00:27:03 UTC
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Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Prose copped from Cohen
That is bullshit, Pendragon, as you've been told a half-dozen or more times, already.
Second-hand pomes
Will's writing second-hand pomes
Combing the pages
Of old Beatnik tomes --
Ginsberg and Cohen
Will gloms from Ginsberg and Cohen
Dylan, O'Hara, Bukowski, McKuen
Second-hand pomes
Will posts his second-hand pomes
Pomes about hookers in old hotel rooms --
Wel-come
to thee world
of Will Dock-ery ...
Such
Michael, you know I don’t like adding to his post count, but that was righteous!
Will Dockery
2018-08-12 11:02:40 UTC
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Post by m***@gmail.com
Post by Will Dockery
And here, your other accusation was shown to be false, Pendragon.
What accusation are you referring to
Post by Will Dockery
It's painfully obvious that your poem was "inspired," at least in part, from "Suzanne Takes You Down." In fact, I'd venture to guess that the vast majority of your poems are derived from rock or folkie songs (like that "Hotel California" clone)
Which you were also mistaken about.
I'm just not well-versed enough in late 60s/early 70s music to pick up on them all.
Seriously, nothing like that is there, although I do love Leonard Cohen's poetry, this is working in a very different area than "Suzanne"... ask somebody who would actually know, like George Dance.
http://youtu.be/st3dbWFKpB8
Angel of Esquiline Hill
Poem by Will Dockery
Music by Rob Wright and Jack Snipe.
Again, I love the Cohen, but this poem is operating on a whole other level, one personal to me and my world.
:)
The only similarities that I can see are that (1) both poems are about a woman, and (2) they both include the phrase "take you down".
I'd reject the second bit of evidence out of hand. I've used the phrase "I will take you down" in a poem myself, and in that case (unlike some times when I've used a Cohen phrase) there was no reference to his poem, not even conscious thought - any more than (I suspect) in the case of Chris Brown's "Take You Down".
Or even John Lennon's "Strawberry Fields"...
:)
Will Dockery
2018-07-29 12:17:13 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Beach Comber
Post by Will Dockery
It's painfully obvious that your poem was "inspired," at least in part, from "Suzanne Takes You Down." In fact, I'd venture to guess that the vast majority of your poems are derived from rock or folkie songs (like that "Hotel California" clone)
Which you were also mistaken about, and I explained to you nearly endlessly.
I'm just not well-versed enough in late 60s/early 70s music to pick up on them all.
Seriously, nothing like that is there, although I do love Leonard Cohen's poetry, this is working in a very different area than "Suzanne"... ask somebody who would actually know, like George Dance.
http://youtu.be/st3dbWFKpB8
Angel of Esquiline Hill
Poem by Will Dockery
Music by Rob Wright and Jack Snipe.
Again, I love the Leonard Cohen poetry, but this poem is operating on a whole other level, one personal to me and my world, as is "Esquiline Hill" unique to me and the setting for my poetry, Shadowville.
So, Ping; George Dance.
:)
Love some Leonard Cohen and it ndoes sound like him Doc.....
Someone once told me I sounded like a cross between "Lynyrd Skynyrd and Leonard Cohen"...

I don't care what anyone says, that's a morale booster.

:)
George J. Dance
2018-08-04 14:58:58 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Post by Beach Comber
Post by Will Dockery
It's painfully obvious that your poem was "inspired," at least in part, from "Suzanne Takes You Down." In fact, I'd venture to guess that the vast majority of your poems are derived from rock or folkie songs (like that "Hotel California" clone)
Which you were also mistaken about, and I explained to you nearly endlessly.
I'm just not well-versed enough in late 60s/early 70s music to pick up on them all.
Seriously, nothing like that is there, although I do love Leonard Cohen's poetry, this is working in a very different area than "Suzanne"... ask somebody who would actually know, like George Dance.
http://youtu.be/st3dbWFKpB8
Angel of Esquiline Hill
Poem by Will Dockery
Music by Rob Wright and Jack Snipe.
Again, I love the Leonard Cohen poetry, but this poem is operating on a whole other level, one personal to me and my world, as is "Esquiline Hill" unique to me and the setting for my poetry, Shadowville.
So, Ping; George Dance.
:)
Love some Leonard Cohen and it ndoes sound like him Doc.....
Someone once told me I sounded like a cross between "Lynyrd Skynyrd and Leonard Cohen"...
I remember that comment; IIRC, though, he said "between Leonard Cohen and Lynyrd Skynyrd." That ordering is important: Cohen is by far the bigger name, so it's better to lead with him - while Skynyrd (except for the few that get to hear "Freebird" now and then on classic rock) is remembered for a one-hit countryrock novelty tune. So ending with them makes the comparison look stranger: it's a bisociation that gets the reader or hearer out of his comfort zone, inviting first laughter and then thought.
Post by Will Dockery
I don't care what anyone says, that's a morale booster.
It's a great line, that really should be in the introduction.
ME
2018-08-04 15:03:20 UTC
Reply
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Post by George J. Dance
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Beach Comber
Post by Will Dockery
It's painfully obvious that your poem was "inspired," at least in part, from "Suzanne Takes You Down." In fact, I'd venture to guess that the vast majority of your poems are derived from rock or folkie songs (like that "Hotel California" clone)
Which you were also mistaken about, and I explained to you nearly endlessly.
I'm just not well-versed enough in late 60s/early 70s music to pick up on them all.
Seriously, nothing like that is there, although I do love Leonard Cohen's poetry, this is working in a very different area than "Suzanne"... ask somebody who would actually know, like George Dance.
http://youtu.be/st3dbWFKpB8
Angel of Esquiline Hill
Poem by Will Dockery
Music by Rob Wright and Jack Snipe.
Again, I love the Leonard Cohen poetry, but this poem is operating on a whole other level, one personal to me and my world, as is "Esquiline Hill" unique to me and the setting for my poetry, Shadowville.
So, Ping; George Dance.
:)
Love some Leonard Cohen and it ndoes sound like him Doc.....
Someone once told me I sounded like a cross between "Lynyrd Skynyrd and Leonard Cohen"...
I remember that comment; IIRC, though, he said "between Leonard Cohen and Lynyrd Skynyrd." That ordering is important: Cohen is by far the bigger name, so it's better to lead with him - while Skynyrd (except for the few that get to hear "Freebird" now and then on classic rock) is remembered for a one-hit countryrock novelty tune. So ending with them makes the comparison look stranger: it's a bisociation that gets the reader or hearer out of his comfort zone, inviting first laughter and then thought.
George, you say above you remember the comment. But you didn’t say who made the comment.
Who made it?
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Will Dockery
I don't care what anyone says, that's a morale booster.
It's a great line, that really should be in the introduction.
George J. Dance
2018-08-05 13:53:43 UTC
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Permalink
Post by ME
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Beach Comber
Post by Will Dockery
It's painfully obvious that your poem was "inspired," at least in part, from "Suzanne Takes You Down." In fact, I'd venture to guess that the vast majority of your poems are derived from rock or folkie songs (like that "Hotel California" clone)
Which you were also mistaken about, and I explained to you nearly endlessly.
I'm just not well-versed enough in late 60s/early 70s music to pick up on them all.
Seriously, nothing like that is there, although I do love Leonard Cohen's poetry, this is working in a very different area than "Suzanne"... ask somebody who would actually know, like George Dance.
http://youtu.be/st3dbWFKpB8
Angel of Esquiline Hill
Poem by Will Dockery
Music by Rob Wright and Jack Snipe.
Again, I love the Leonard Cohen poetry, but this poem is operating on a whole other level, one personal to me and my world, as is "Esquiline Hill" unique to me and the setting for my poetry, Shadowville.
So, Ping; George Dance.
:)
Love some Leonard Cohen and it ndoes sound like him Doc.....
Someone once told me I sounded like a cross between "Lynyrd Skynyrd and Leonard Cohen"...
I remember that comment; IIRC, though, he said "between Leonard Cohen and Lynyrd Skynyrd." That ordering is important: Cohen is by far the bigger name, so it's better to lead with him - while Skynyrd (except for the few that get to hear "Freebird" now and then on classic rock) is remembered for a one-hit countryrock novelty tune. So ending with them makes the comparison look stranger: it's a bisociation that gets the reader or hearer out of his comfort zone, inviting first laughter and then thought.
George, you say above you remember the comment. But you didn’t say who made the comment.
Who made it?
As I recall the story I read: it was 2 young men walking by a venue that had Will's name up; one asked who "Will Dockery" was, and the second guy told him that.
Post by ME
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Will Dockery
I don't care what anyone says, that's a morale booster.
It's a great line, that really should be in the introduction.
Will Dockery
2018-08-04 15:15:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Beach Comber
Post by Will Dockery
It's painfully obvious that your poem was "inspired," at least in part, from "Suzanne Takes You Down." In fact, I'd venture to guess that the vast majority of your poems are derived from rock or folkie songs (like that "Hotel California" clone)
Which you were also mistaken about, and I explained to you nearly endlessly.
I'm just not well-versed enough in late 60s/early 70s music to pick up on them all.
Seriously, nothing like that is there, although I do love Leonard Cohen's poetry, this is working in a very different area than "Suzanne"... ask somebody who would actually know, like George Dance.
http://youtu.be/st3dbWFKpB8
Angel of Esquiline Hill
Poem by Will Dockery
Music by Rob Wright and Jack Snipe.
Again, I love the Leonard Cohen poetry, but this poem is operating on a whole other level, one personal to me and my world, as is "Esquiline Hill" unique to me and the setting for my poetry, Shadowville.
So, Ping; George Dance.
:)
Love some Leonard Cohen and it ndoes sound like him Doc.....
Someone once told me I sounded like a cross between "Lynyrd Skynyrd and Leonard Cohen"...
I remember that comment; IIRC, though, he said "between Leonard Cohen and Lynyrd Skynyrd." That ordering is important: Cohen is by far the bigger name, so it's better to lead with him - while Skynyrd (except for the few that get to hear "Freebird" now and then on classic rock) is remembered for a one-hit countryrock novelty tune. So ending with them makes the comparison look stranger: it's a bisociation that gets the reader or hearer out of his comfort zone, inviting first laughter and then thought.
Post by Will Dockery
I don't care what anyone says, that's a morale booster.
It's a great line, that really should be in the introduction.
Having lived and grown up in the Deep South it is difficult to remember the context that Lynyrd Skynyrd is so obscure outside of the region.

No word on the introduction yet, perhaps M.H. Benders would be interested?

:)
ME
2018-08-04 15:17:56 UTC
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Post by Will Dockery
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Beach Comber
Post by Will Dockery
It's painfully obvious that your poem was "inspired," at least in part, from "Suzanne Takes You Down." In fact, I'd venture to guess that the vast majority of your poems are derived from rock or folkie songs (like that "Hotel California" clone)
Which you were also mistaken about, and I explained to you nearly endlessly.
I'm just not well-versed enough in late 60s/early 70s music to pick up on them all.
Seriously, nothing like that is there, although I do love Leonard Cohen's poetry, this is working in a very different area than "Suzanne"... ask somebody who would actually know, like George Dance.
http://youtu.be/st3dbWFKpB8
Angel of Esquiline Hill
Poem by Will Dockery
Music by Rob Wright and Jack Snipe.
Again, I love the Leonard Cohen poetry, but this poem is operating on a whole other level, one personal to me and my world, as is "Esquiline Hill" unique to me and the setting for my poetry, Shadowville.
So, Ping; George Dance.
:)
Love some Leonard Cohen and it ndoes sound like him Doc.....
Someone once told me I sounded like a cross between "Lynyrd Skynyrd and Leonard Cohen"...
I remember that comment; IIRC, though, he said "between Leonard Cohen and Lynyrd Skynyrd." That ordering is important: Cohen is by far the bigger name, so it's better to lead with him - while Skynyrd (except for the few that get to hear "Freebird" now and then on classic rock) is remembered for a one-hit countryrock novelty tune. So ending with them makes the comparison look stranger: it's a bisociation that gets the reader or hearer out of his comfort zone, inviting first laughter and then thought.
Post by Will Dockery
I don't care what anyone says, that's a morale booster.
It's a great line, that really should be in the introduction.
Having lived and grown up in the Deep South it is difficult to remember the context that Lynyrd Skynyrd is so obscure outside of the region.
No word on the introduction yet, perhaps M.H. Benders would be interested?
:)
But will, who made the comment? Are you attributing that comment to Benders?
Will Dockery
2018-08-04 15:38:32 UTC
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Post by ME
Post by Will Dockery
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Beach Comber
Post by Will Dockery
Seriously, nothing like that is there, although I do love Leonard Cohen's poetry, this is working in a very different area than "Suzanne"... ask somebody who would actually know, like George Dance.
http://youtu.be/st3dbWFKpB8
Angel of Esquiline Hill
Poem by Will Dockery
Music by Rob Wright and Jack Snipe.
Again, I love the Leonard Cohen poetry, but this poem is operating on a whole other level, one personal to me and my world, as is "Esquiline Hill" unique to me and the setting for my poetry, Shadowville.
So, Ping; George Dance.
:)
Love some Leonard Cohen and it ndoes sound like him Doc.....
Someone once told me I sounded like a cross between "Lynyrd Skynyrd and Leonard Cohen"...
I remember that comment; IIRC, though, he said "between Leonard Cohen and Lynyrd Skynyrd." That ordering is important: Cohen is by far the bigger name, so it's better to lead with him - while Skynyrd (except for the few that get to hear "Freebird" now and then on classic rock) is remembered for a one-hit countryrock novelty tune. So ending with them makes the comparison look stranger: it's a bisociation that gets the reader or hearer out of his comfort zone, inviting first laughter and then thought.
Post by Will Dockery
I don't care what anyone says, that's a morale booster.
It's a great line, that really should be in the introduction.
Having lived and grown up in the Deep South it is difficult to remember the context that Lynyrd Skynyrd is so obscure outside of the region.
No word on the introduction yet, perhaps M.H. Benders would be interested?
:)
But will, who made the comment? Are you attributing that comment to Benders?
Sounds more like it was Stuart Leichter, I'll have to check and verify in the archives.
George J. Dance
2018-08-05 14:04:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Beach Comber
Post by Will Dockery
It's painfully obvious that your poem was "inspired," at least in part, from "Suzanne Takes You Down." In fact, I'd venture to guess that the vast majority of your poems are derived from rock or folkie songs (like that "Hotel California" clone)
Which you were also mistaken about, and I explained to you nearly endlessly.
I'm just not well-versed enough in late 60s/early 70s music to pick up on them all.
Seriously, nothing like that is there, although I do love Leonard Cohen's poetry, this is working in a very different area than "Suzanne"... ask somebody who would actually know, like George Dance.
http://youtu.be/st3dbWFKpB8
Angel of Esquiline Hill
Poem by Will Dockery
Music by Rob Wright and Jack Snipe.
Again, I love the Leonard Cohen poetry, but this poem is operating on a whole other level, one personal to me and my world, as is "Esquiline Hill" unique to me and the setting for my poetry, Shadowville.
So, Ping; George Dance.
:)
Love some Leonard Cohen and it ndoes sound like him Doc.....
Someone once told me I sounded like a cross between "Lynyrd Skynyrd and Leonard Cohen"...
I remember that comment; IIRC, though, he said "between Leonard Cohen and Lynyrd Skynyrd." That ordering is important: Cohen is by far the bigger name, so it's better to lead with him - while Skynyrd (except for the few that get to hear "Freebird" now and then on classic rock) is remembered for a one-hit countryrock novelty tune. So ending with them makes the comparison look stranger: it's a bisociation that gets the reader or hearer out of his comfort zone, inviting first laughter and then thought.
Post by Will Dockery
I don't care what anyone says, that's a morale booster.
It's a great line, that really should be in the introduction.
Having lived and grown up in the Deep South it is difficult to remember the context that Lynyrd Skynyrd is so obscure outside of the region.
No word on the introduction yet, perhaps M.H. Benders would be interested?
:)
You could write and ask, but I'm sceptical. Look at the two sets of MHB comments
on you that get recycled here; they couldn't be more different. The most obvious comparisons are with Psychodragon's comments on my poems, from when he considered himself my ally vs when he considered himself my enemy. So I have to think it's the same with Benders: he dissed you when he had no use for you, and praised you when you were useful to him.

I've only had one online conversation with MHB; once I wrote to tell him I liked his poem, and mentioned another Dutch poet I remembered reading in translation and writing - I don't even remember his name, now, but he was the Dutch poet laureate. MHB's reply was to go on the attack against the laureate, sending me this screed about what a talentless phony he was. That's the only background context I've got for the above judgement; you can see how it fits.
Will Dockery
2018-08-06 21:40:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Will Dockery
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Beach Comber
Post by Will Dockery
Seriously, nothing like that is there, although I do love Leonard Cohen's poetry, this is working in a very different area than "Suzanne"... ask somebody who would actually know, like George Dance.
http://youtu.be/st3dbWFKpB8
Angel of Esquiline Hill
Poem by Will Dockery
Music by Rob Wright and Jack Snipe.
Again, I love the Leonard Cohen poetry, but this poem is operating on a whole other level, one personal to me and my world, as is "Esquiline Hill" unique to me and the setting for my poetry, Shadowville.
So, Ping; George Dance.
:)
Love some Leonard Cohen and it ndoes sound like him Doc.....
Someone once told me I sounded like a cross between "Lynyrd Skynyrd and Leonard Cohen"...
I remember that comment; IIRC, though, he said "between Leonard Cohen and Lynyrd Skynyrd." That ordering is important: Cohen is by far the bigger name, so it's better to lead with him - while Skynyrd (except for the few that get to hear "Freebird" now and then on classic rock) is remembered for a one-hit countryrock novelty tune. So ending with them makes the comparison look stranger: it's a bisociation that gets the reader or hearer out of his comfort zone, inviting first laughter and then thought.
Post by Will Dockery
I don't care what anyone says, that's a morale booster.
It's a great line, that really should be in the introduction.
Having lived and grown up in the Deep South it is difficult to remember the context that Lynyrd Skynyrd is so obscure outside of the region.
No word on the introduction yet, perhaps M.H. Benders would be interested?
:)
You could write and ask, but I'm sceptical. Look at the two sets of MHB comments
on you that get recycled here; they couldn't be more different. The most obvious comparisons are with Psychodragon's comments on my poems, from when he considered himself my ally vs when he considered himself my enemy. So I have to think it's the same with Benders: he dissed you when he had no use for you, and praised you when you were useful to him.
I've only had one online conversation with MHB; once I wrote to tell him I liked his poem, and mentioned another Dutch poet I remembered reading in translation and writing - I don't even remember his name, now, but he was the Dutch poet laureate. MHB's reply was to go on the attack against the laureate, sending me this screed about what a talentless phony he was. That's the only background context I've got for the above judgement; you can see how it fits.
Yes, there definitely is a lot of those sort of political shenanigans, and M.H.B. noticeably shifted his opinions during a particularly long flame war I was having with Dale M. Houstman, which I notice for comments and even parody videos of Houstman, Benders despises him to this day, which was basically the old "he's a better poet than you" riff, in the old enemy of my enemy trope.

But, 15 years later Benders remains a friend, and who knows where Houstman wandered off to.

:)
Will Dockery
2018-08-05 11:51:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Beach Comber
Post by Will Dockery
Seriously, nothing like that is there, although I do love Leonard Cohen's poetry, this is working in a very different area than "Suzanne"... ask somebody who would actually know, like George Dance.
http://youtu.be/st3dbWFKpB8
Angel of Esquiline Hill
Poem by Will Dockery
Music by Rob Wright and Jack Snipe.
Again, I love the Leonard Cohen poetry, but this poem is operating on a whole other level, one personal to me and my world, as is "Esquiline Hill" unique to me and the setting for my poetry, Shadowville.
So, Ping; George Dance.
:)
Love some Leonard Cohen and it ndoes sound like him Doc.....
Someone once told me I sounded like a cross between "Lynyrd Skynyrd and Leonard Cohen"...
I remember that comment; IIRC, though, he said "between Leonard Cohen and Lynyrd Skynyrd." That ordering is important: Cohen is by far the bigger name, so it's better to lead with him - while Skynyrd (except for the few that get to hear "Freebird" now and then on classic rock) is remembered for a one-hit countryrock novelty tune. So ending with them makes the comparison look stranger: it's a bisociation that gets the reader or hearer out of his comfort zone, inviting first laughter and then thought.
Post by Will Dockery
I don't care what anyone says, that's a morale booster.
It's a great line, that really should be in the introduction.
The line is certainly open to several different interpretations.

I will check with the archives today for the quote and who wrote it.
Me
2018-08-05 12:30:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Beach Comber
Post by Will Dockery
Seriously, nothing like that is there, although I do love Leonard Cohen's poetry, this is working in a very different area than "Suzanne"... ask somebody who would actually know, like George Dance.
http://youtu.be/st3dbWFKpB8
Angel of Esquiline Hill
Poem by Will Dockery
Music by Rob Wright and Jack Snipe.
Again, I love the Leonard Cohen poetry, but this poem is operating on a whole other level, one personal to me and my world, as is "Esquiline Hill" unique to me and the setting for my poetry, Shadowville.
So, Ping; George Dance.
:)
Love some Leonard Cohen and it ndoes sound like him Doc.....
Someone once told me I sounded like a cross between "Lynyrd Skynyrd and Leonard Cohen"...
I remember that comment; IIRC, though, he said "between Leonard Cohen and Lynyrd Skynyrd." That ordering is important: Cohen is by far the bigger name, so it's better to lead with him - while Skynyrd (except for the few that get to hear "Freebird" now and then on classic rock) is remembered for a one-hit countryrock novelty tune. So ending with them makes the comparison look stranger: it's a bisociation that gets the reader or hearer out of his comfort zone, inviting first laughter and then thought.
Post by Will Dockery
I don't care what anyone says, that's a morale booster.
It's a great line, that really should be in the introduction.
The line is certainly open to several different interpretations.
I will check with the archives today for the quote and who wrote it.
Will’ you’d think you would remember who gave such a compliment.
You remember and post every one you’ve gotten since grade school.
Will Dockery
2018-08-05 12:33:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
No, "Me", thanks for the vote of confidence, but no, I'm not perfect.

😀
Me
2018-08-05 12:36:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
No, "Me", thanks for the vote of confidence, but no, I'm not perfect.
😀
What does not being perfect have to do with not attributing an actual name to a ‘compliment someone gave you.
Thomas Jones
2018-08-05 12:49:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
No, "Me", thanks for the vote of confidence, but no, I'm not perfect.
😀
but you do pay your taxes, right Jowls...You pay your share, right?
Me
2018-08-20 17:13:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Beach Comber
Post by Will Dockery
It's painfully obvious that your poem was "inspired," at least in part, from "Suzanne Takes You Down." In fact, I'd venture to guess that the vast majority of your poems are derived from rock or folkie songs (like that "Hotel California" clone)
Which you were also mistaken about, and I explained to you nearly endlessly.
I'm just not well-versed enough in late 60s/early 70s music to pick up on them all.
Seriously, nothing like that is there, although I do love Leonard Cohen's poetry, this is working in a very different area than "Suzanne"... ask somebody who would actually know, like George Dance.
http://youtu.be/st3dbWFKpB8
Angel of Esquiline Hill
Poem by Will Dockery
Music by Rob Wright and Jack Snipe.
Again, I love the Leonard Cohen poetry, but this poem is operating on a whole other level, one personal to me and my world, as is "Esquiline Hill" unique to me and the setting for my poetry, Shadowville.
So, Ping; George Dance.
:)
Love some Leonard Cohen and it ndoes sound like him Doc.....
Someone once told me I sounded like a cross between "Lynyrd Skynyrd and Leonard Cohen"...
I don't care what anyone says, that's a morale booster.
Will. Did you and George ever find the guy who gave you that compliment?
George claimed he remembered when you got it.
Post by Will Dockery
:)
Will Dockery
2018-08-20 17:34:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Me
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Beach Comber
Post by Will Dockery
Seriously, nothing like that is there, although I do love Leonard Cohen's poetry, this is working in a very different area than "Suzanne"... ask somebody who would actually know, like George Dance.
http://youtu.be/st3dbWFKpB8
Angel of Esquiline Hill
Poem by Will Dockery
Music by Rob Wright and Jack Snipe.
Again, I love the Leonard Cohen poetry, but this poem is operating on a whole other level, one personal to me and my world, as is "Esquiline Hill" unique to me and the setting for my poetry, Shadowville.
So, Ping; George Dance.
:)
Love some Leonard Cohen and it ndoes sound like him Doc.....
Someone once told me I sounded like a cross between "Lynyrd Skynyrd and Leonard Cohen"...
I don't care what anyone says, that's a morale booster.
Will. Did you and George ever find the guy who gave you that compliment?
George claimed he remembered when you got it.
I haven't had the time to look for the post as of yet, but plan to soon.

Thanks for asking, :Me".
Will Dockery
2018-08-01 19:14:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Yes, they were current at exactly the same time period.
Will Dockery
2018-08-05 03:04:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I will check with the archives later tonight för the quote and who wrote it.
Will Dockery
2018-08-05 12:38:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I wrote that I didn't remember and will have to check back and see.

That's what.

😀
Will Dockery
2018-08-05 12:51:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Obsess much, Thomas?

😀
Thomas Jones
2018-08-05 13:12:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Obsess much, Thomas?
😀
you got teeth?
Will Dockery
2018-08-05 13:15:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Again, your obsession with my appearance is noted.

Slobber on, Thomas.

Heh...
Will Dockery
2018-08-12 01:05:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
And here, your other accusation was shown to be false, Pendragon.
m***@gmail.com
2018-08-12 03:04:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
And here, your other accusation was shown to be false, Pendragon.
What accusation are you referring to, Jowls? Your post is following a rehash of your public embarrassment at the hands of M.H.B.
Will Dockery
2018-08-12 03:11:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
The accusation that I copped a Leonard Cohen poem in writing this one.

But we've already established that you've melted down into a puddle of bullshit tonight, Pendragon.

😀
ME
2018-08-12 03:13:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
The accusation that I copped a Leonard Cohen poem in writing this one.
But we've already established that you've melted down into a puddle of bullshit tonight, Pendragon.
😀
No will, that has not been established here. That’s just your accusation.
Let’s keep it real!
Will Dockery
2018-08-12 03:24:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
It's painfully obvious that your poem was "inspired," at least in part, from "Suzanne Takes You Down." In fact, I'd venture to guess that the vast majority of your poems are derived from rock or folkie songs (like that "Hotel California" clone)
Which you were also mistaken about, and I explained to you nearly endlessly.
I'm just not well-versed enough in late 60s/early 70s music to pick up on them all.
Seriously, nothing like that is there, although I do love Leonard Cohen's poetry, this is working in a very different area than "Suzanne"... ask somebody who would actually know, like George Dance.
http://youtu.be/st3dbWFKpB8
Angel of Esquiline Hill
Poem by Will Dockery
Music by Rob Wright and Jack Snipe.
Again, I love the Leonard Cohen poetry, but this poem is operating on a whole other level, one personal to me and my world, as is "Esquiline Hill" unique to me and the setting for my poetry, Shadowville.
So, Ping; George Dance.
:)
Did you actually read the post, "Me"?
Norman Bean
2018-08-12 04:04:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
It's painfully obvious that your poem was "inspired," at least in part, from "Suzanne Takes You Down." In fact, I'd venture to guess that the vast majority of your poems are derived from rock or folkie songs (like that "Hotel California" clone)
Which you were also mistaken about, and I explained to you nearly endlessly.
I'm just not well-versed enough in late 60s/early 70s music to pick up on them all.
Seriously, nothing like that is there, although I do love Leonard Cohen's poetry, this is working in a very different area than "Suzanne"... ask somebody who would actually know, like George Dance.
http://youtu.be/st3dbWFKpB8
Angel of Esquiline Hill
Poem by Will Dockery
Music by Rob Wright and Jack Snipe.
Again, I love the Leonard Cohen poetry, but this poem is operating on a whole other level, one personal to me and my world, as is "Esquiline Hill" unique to me and the setting for my poetry, Shadowville.
So, Ping; George Dance.
:)
Good rockin tune Doc......
Will Dockery
2018-08-12 23:57:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Norman Bean
Post by Will Dockery
Seriously, nothing like that is there, although I do love Leonard Cohen's poetry, this is working in a very different area than "Suzanne"... ask somebody who would actually know, like George Dance.
http://youtu.be/st3dbWFKpB8
Post by Norman Bean
Post by Will Dockery
Angel of Esquiline Hill
Poem by Will Dockery
Music by Rob Wright and Jack Snipe.
Again, I love the Leonard Cohen poetry, but this poem is operating on a whole other level, one personal to me and my world, as is "Esquiline Hill" unique to me and the setting for my poetry, Shadowville.
So, Ping; George Dance.
:)
Good rockin tune Doc......
Thanks again, Norman.

😀
Will Dockery
2018-08-12 06:09:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Thanks again, Norman.

😀
Will Dockery
2018-08-14 11:37:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
True, George, he sure does go to some absurd lengths to try and discredit me, doesn't he?

😀
Michael Pendragon
2018-08-14 13:03:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
True, George, he sure does go to some absurd lengths to try and discredit me, doesn't he?
No one's trying to "discredit" you, Will.

How could anyone possibly discredit you?

You've been writing poetry for over 40 years and have never been published. You've been singing for over 40 years and the only "gig" you can get is singing one song (written by somebody else) a week on "open mic night" at the local bar.
Your greatest achievement was winning the "Perky" award 30 years ago (and the "Perky" turns out to have been a nod from the local paper, which gave out Perkys for everthing from Best Barber to Best Chinese Restaurant to Best Hopscotch Player).
You live in a shed and mooch off of your disabled brother.
You're the Frankie Williams of poetry, and the laughingstock of aapc.

What "credit" could you possibly think you have?
Will Dockery
2018-08-16 16:17:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Michael Pendragon
You've been writing poetry for over 40 years and have never been published
Except that I've had over 200 poems and columns published over the last
twenty years, with a circulation of 10,000 copies distributed each month.

Kind of makes your statement a blatant misrepresentation if not an outright
lie, you see,
m***@gmail.com
2018-08-16 18:12:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
You've been writing poetry for over 40 years and have never been published
Except that I've had over 200 poems and columns published over the last
twenty years, with a circulation of 10,000 copies distributed each month.
Kind of makes your statement a blatant misrepresentation if not an outright
lie, you see,
You tell 'em, Frankie!


NancyGene
2018-08-16 19:27:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by m***@gmail.com
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
You've been writing poetry for over 40 years and have never been published
Except that I've had over 200 poems and columns published over the last
twenty years, with a circulation of 10,000 copies distributed each month.
Kind of makes your statement a blatant misrepresentation if not an outright
lie, you see,
You tell 'em, Frankie!
http://youtu.be/qo_QrixLSSc
They both sit in an interesting way. Did they go to Nelly's Columbus School of Etiquette?
Will Dockery
2018-08-14 13:19:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Like I said...

😀
Michael Pendragon
2018-08-14 13:21:37 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Like I said...
Wake up and smell the damn coffee, Will.
Will Dockery
2018-08-14 13:25:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
You were wrong about "Angel of Esquiline Hill", Pendragon... but being wrong is nothing new for you, after all.
Michael Pendragon
2018-08-14 13:37:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
You were wrong about "Angel of Esquiline Hill", Pendragon... but being wrong is nothing new for you, after all.
I'm starting to think your entire catalog is one big riff on "Suzanne Takes You Down."
Will Dockery
2018-08-20 03:31:35 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Michael Pendragon
I'm starting to think your entire catalog is one big riff on "Suzanne Takes You Down."
While not even your first comparison is in any way an accurate one. Just look at the two, anyone. Here's mine:

Angel of Esquiline Hill

Did she go too far?
Waiting on the new crowded,
waiting for the woman with a gun.
Little prisms semi-naked on horseback,
dark halo surrounds her beautiful evil.
Sirens ring out tonight.
Sirens over Benning Hills tonight
little speckles of starlight..

Did she go too far
from the North Highland?
Did she go the way of the world and the wood?
Pale blue skin and sky
she's a Goddess now, on high.
Sirens ring out, sirens ring out
on Esquiline Hill.

On her wit we humbly wait.
Arm and Hammer tattooed on her shoulder.
Goddess gold and dusted
and roaring.
Dodge or on a dare,
on a sturm and drang,
watch her run like wild horses.
Sirens ring out, on that hill tonight,
sirens ring out like little speckles tonight.
Did she go to far,
from the North Highland?
Did she go too high
pale blue sky and skin.

Let me take you down she says,
down, down again.
Let me take you down son,
take you down,
into the sirens... on high.

Did she go too far?
Waiting on the new crowded,
waiting for the woman with a gun.
Prism, semi-naked on horseback.
Dark halo, frames her beautiful evil.
Sirens ring out... sirens ringing.
Little flecks of starlight over Benning Hills.
Spiderweb whirls, pale blue skin and sky,
Stars flicker tonight.
Starlight, sirens ringing on Benning Hills,
she's gone too high.
Let me take you down, she says.
Let me take you down... to silence.

-Will Dockery

And now the Leonard Cohen classic, "Suzanne":

https://songmeanings.com/songs/view/62576/

Suzanne takes you down to her place near the river
You can hear the boats go by, you can spend the night forever
And you know that she's half-crazy but that's why you want to be there
And she feeds you tea and oranges that come all the way from China
And just when you mean to tell her that you have no love to give her
Then he gets you on her wavelength
And she lets the river answer that you've always been her lover

And you want to travel with her, and you want to travel blind
And you know that she will trust you
For you've touched her perfect body with your mind

And Jesus was a sailor when he walked upon the water
And he spent a long time watching from his lonely wooden tower
And when he knew for certain only drowning men could see him
He said all men will be sailors then until the sea shall free them
But he himself was broken, long before the sky would open
Forsaken, almost human, he sank beneath your wisdom like a stone

And you want to travel with him, and you want to travel blind
And you think you maybe you'll trust him
For he's touched your perfect body with her mind

Now, Suzanne takes your hand and she leads you to the river
She's wearing rags and feathers from Salvation Army counters
And the sun pours down like honey on our lady of the harbor
And she shows you where to look among the garbage and the flowers
There are heroes in the seaweed, there are children in the morning
They are leaning out for love and they wil lean that way forever
While Suzanne holds her mirror

And you want to travel with her, and you want to travel blind
And you know that you can trust her
For she's touched your perfect body with her mind

-Leonard Cohen

I just don't see any serious connection, so why not spell it out, Pndragon, fo those of us who don't "get that"?
Michael Pendragon
2018-08-20 04:07:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
I'm starting to think your entire catalog is one big riff on "Suzanne Takes You Down."
Angel of Esquiline Hill
Did she go too far?
Waiting on the new crowded,
waiting for the woman with a gun.
Little prisms semi-naked on horseback,
dark halo surrounds her beautiful evil.
Sirens ring out tonight.
Sirens over Benning Hills tonight
little speckles of starlight..
Did she go too far
from the North Highland?
Did she go the way of the world and the wood?
Pale blue skin and sky
she's a Goddess now, on high.
Sirens ring out, sirens ring out
on Esquiline Hill.
On her wit we humbly wait.
Arm and Hammer tattooed on her shoulder.
Goddess gold and dusted
and roaring.
Dodge or on a dare,
on a sturm and drang,
watch her run like wild horses.
Sirens ring out, on that hill tonight,
sirens ring out like little speckles tonight.
Did she go to far,
from the North Highland?
Did she go too high
pale blue sky and skin.
Let me take you down she says,
down, down again.
Let me take you down son,
take you down,
into the sirens... on high.
Did she go too far?
Waiting on the new crowded,
waiting for the woman with a gun.
Prism, semi-naked on horseback.
Dark halo, frames her beautiful evil.
Sirens ring out... sirens ringing.
Little flecks of starlight over Benning Hills.
Spiderweb whirls, pale blue skin and sky,
Stars flicker tonight.
Starlight, sirens ringing on Benning Hills,
she's gone too high.
Let me take you down, she says.
Let me take you down... to silence.
-Will Dockery
https://songmeanings.com/songs/view/62576/
Suzanne takes you down to her place near the river
You can hear the boats go by, you can spend the night forever
And you know that she's half-crazy but that's why you want to be there
And she feeds you tea and oranges that come all the way from China
And just when you mean to tell her that you have no love to give her
Then he gets you on her wavelength
And she lets the river answer that you've always been her lover
And you want to travel with her, and you want to travel blind
And you know that she will trust you
For you've touched her perfect body with your mind
And Jesus was a sailor when he walked upon the water
And he spent a long time watching from his lonely wooden tower
And when he knew for certain only drowning men could see him
He said all men will be sailors then until the sea shall free them
But he himself was broken, long before the sky would open
Forsaken, almost human, he sank beneath your wisdom like a stone
And you want to travel with him, and you want to travel blind
And you think you maybe you'll trust him
For he's touched your perfect body with her mind
Now, Suzanne takes your hand and she leads you to the river
She's wearing rags and feathers from Salvation Army counters
And the sun pours down like honey on our lady of the harbor
And she shows you where to look among the garbage and the flowers
There are heroes in the seaweed, there are children in the morning
They are leaning out for love and they wil lean that way forever
While Suzanne holds her mirror
And you want to travel with her, and you want to travel blind
And you know that you can trust her
For she's touched your perfect body with her mind
-Leonard Cohen
I just don't see any serious connection, so why not spell it out, Pndragon, fo those of us who don't "get that"?
Been there -- done that.

Anyone who doubts the similarity between the two works can randomly swap out lines with minimal effect on either the rhythm, fluidity, or meaning.

Suzanne takes you down to her place near the river
You can hear the boats go by
You can spend the night forever
And you know that she's half-crazy
But that's why you want to be there
On her wit we humbly wait
Arm and Hammer tattooed on her shoulder.
Goddess gold and dusted
And she feeds you tea and oranges
That come all the way from China
Watch her run like wild horses
Sirens ring out on that hill tonight
Sirens ring out like little speckles tonight
And just when you mean to tell her
That you have no love to give her
Then he gets you on her wavelength
And she lets the river answer
That you've always been her lover
From the North Highland
Did she go the way of the world and the wood?
Pale blue skin and sky
Little prisms semi-naked on horseback
Dark halo surrounds her beautiful evil
And you want to travel with her
and you want to travel blind
And you know that she will trust you
For you've touched her perfect body with your mind
Let me take you down she says
Down, down again
Let me take you down son
Take you down
Into the sirens... on high

etc.
Will Dockery
2018-08-20 05:22:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Angel of Esquiline Hill
Did she go too far?
Waiting on the new crowded,
waiting for the woman with a gun.
Little prisms semi-naked on horseback,
dark halo surrounds her beautiful evil.
Sirens ring out tonight.
Sirens over Benning Hills tonight
little speckles of starlight..
Did she go too far
from the North Highland?
Did she go the way of the world and the wood?
Pale blue skin and sky
she's a Goddess now, on high.
Sirens ring out, sirens ring out
on Esquiline Hill.
On her wit we humbly wait.
Arm and Hammer tattooed on her shoulder.
Goddess gold and dusted
and roaring.
Dodge or on a dare,
on a sturm and drang,
watch her run like wild horses.
Sirens ring out, on that hill tonight,
sirens ring out like little speckles tonight.
Did she go to far,
from the North Highland?
Did she go too high
pale blue sky and skin.
Let me take you down she says,
down, down again.
Let me take you down son,
take you down,
into the sirens... on high.
Did she go too far?
Waiting on the new crowded,
waiting for the woman with a gun.
Prism, semi-naked on horseback.
Dark halo, frames her beautiful evil.
Sirens ring out... sirens ringing.
Little flecks of starlight over Benning Hills.
Spiderweb whirls, pale blue skin and sky,
Stars flicker tonight.
Starlight, sirens ringing on Benning Hills,
she's gone too high.
Let me take you down, she says.
Let me take you down... to silence.
-Will Dockery
https://songmeanings.com/songs/view/62576/
Suzanne takes you down to her place near the river
You can hear the boats go by, you can spend the night forever
And you know that she's half-crazy but that's why you want to be there
And she feeds you tea and oranges that come all the way from China
<snip>
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
-Leonard Cohen
I just don't see any serious connection, so why not spell it out, Pndragon, fo those of us who don't "get that"?
Been there -- done that.
Anyone who doubts the similarity between the two works can randomly swap out lines with minimal effect on either the rhythm, fluidity, or meaning.
Knowing the Leonard Cohen song really well, that just doesn't go over, but I'll just say, as Corey would... "Oh, whatever."
Post by Michael Pendragon
Suzanne takes you down to her place near the river
You can hear the boats go by
You can spend the night forever
And you know that she's half-crazy
But that's why you want to be there
On her wit we humbly wait
Arm and Hammer tattooed on her shoulder.
Goddess gold and dusted
And she feeds you tea and oranges
That come all the way from China
Watch her run like wild horses
Sirens ring out on that hill tonight
Sirens ring out like little speckles tonight
And just when you mean to tell her
That you have no love to give her
Then he gets you on her wavelength
And she lets the river answer
That you've always been her lover
From the North Highland
Did she go the way of the world and the wood?
Pale blue skin and sky
Little prisms semi-naked on horseback
Dark halo surrounds her beautiful evil
And you want to travel with her
and you want to travel blind
And you know that she will trust you
For you've touched her perfect body with your mind
Let me take you down she says
Down, down again
Let me take you down son
Take you down
Into the sirens... on high
etc.
Will Dockery
2018-08-20 12:50:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Angel of Esquiline Hill
Did she go too far?
Waiting on the new crowded,
waiting for the woman with a gun.
Little prisms semi-naked on horseback,
dark halo surrounds her beautiful evil.
Sirens ring out tonight.
Sirens over Benning Hills tonight
little speckles of starlight..
Did she go too far
from the North Highland?
Did she go the way of the world and the wood?
Pale blue skin and sky
she's a Goddess now, on high.
Sirens ring out, sirens ring out
on Esquiline Hill.
On her wit we humbly wait.
Arm and Hammer tattooed on her shoulder.
Goddess gold and dusted
and roaring.
Dodge or on a dare,
on a sturm and drang,
watch her run like wild horses.
Sirens ring out, on that hill tonight,
sirens ring out like little speckles tonight.
Did she go to far,
from the North Highland?
Did she go too high
pale blue sky and skin.
Let me take you down she says,
down, down again.
Let me take you down son,
take you down,
into the sirens... on high.
Did she go too far?
Waiting on the new crowded,
waiting for the woman with a gun.
Prism, semi-naked on horseback.
Dark halo, frames her beautiful evil.
Sirens ring out... sirens ringing.
Little flecks of starlight over Benning Hills.
Spiderweb whirls, pale blue skin and sky,
Stars flicker tonight.
Starlight, sirens ringing on Benning Hills,
she's gone too high.
Let me take you down, she says.
Let me take you down... to silence.
-Will Dockery
http://youtu.be/st3dbWFKpB8

Angel of Esquiline Hill
Poem by Will Dockery
Music by Rob Wright and Jack Snipe.
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
https://songmeanings.com/songs/view/62576/
Suzanne takes you down to her place near the river
You can hear the boats go by, you can spend the night forever
And you know that she's half-crazy but that's why you want to be there
And she feeds you tea and oranges that come all the way from China
<snip>
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
-Leonard Cohen
I just don't see any serious connection, so why not spell it out, Pndragon, fo those of us who don't "get that"?
Been there -- done that.
Anyone who doubts the similarity between the two works can randomly swap out lines with minimal effect on either the rhythm, fluidity, or meaning.
Knowing the Leonard Cohen song really well, that just doesn't go over, but I'll just say, as Corey would... "Oh, whatever."
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Suzanne takes you down to her place near the river
You can hear the boats go by
You can spend the night forever
And you know that she's half-crazy
But that's why you want to be there
On her wit we humbly wait
Arm and Hammer tattooed on her shoulder.
Goddess gold and dusted
And she feeds you tea and oranges
That come all the way from China
Watch her run like wild horses
Sirens ring out on that hill tonight
Sirens ring out like little speckles tonight
And just when you mean to tell her
That you have no love to give her
Then he gets you on her wavelength
And she lets the river answer
That you've always been her lover
From the North Highland
Did she go the way of the world and the wood?
Pale blue skin and sky
Little prisms semi-naked on horseback
Dark halo surrounds her beautiful evil
And you want to travel with her
and you want to travel blind
And you know that she will trust you
For you've touched her perfect body with your mind
Let me take you down she says
Down, down again
Let me take you down son
Take you down
Into the sirens... on high
etc.
"The only similarities that I can see are that (1) both poems are about a woman, and (2) they both include the phrase 'take you down'..."
"I'd reject the second bit of evidence out of hand. I've used the phrase "I will take you down" in a poem myself, and in that case (unlike some times when I've used a Cohen phrase) there was no reference to his poem, not even conscious thought - any more than (I suspect) in the case of Chris Brown's 'Take You Down'..." -George J. Dance
Will Dockery
2018-08-14 13:43:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
You know you can think whatever you want, Pendragon, even if you're wrong.

Like you are now.

;)
Norman Bean
2018-08-16 05:43:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
It's painfully obvious that your poem was "inspired," at least in part, from "Suzanne Takes You Down." In fact, I'd venture to guess that the vast majority of your poems are derived from rock or folkie songs (like that "Hotel California" clone)
Which you were also mistaken about, and I explained to you nearly endlessly.
I'm just not well-versed enough in late 60s/early 70s music to pick up on them all.
Seriously, nothing like that is there, although I do love Leonard Cohen's poetry, this is working in a very different area than "Suzanne"... ask somebody who would actually know, like George Dance.
http://youtu.be/st3dbWFKpB8
Angel of Esquiline Hill
Poem by Will Dockery
Music by Rob Wright and Jack Snipe.
Again, I love the Leonard Cohen poetry, but this poem is operating on a whole other level, one personal to me and my world, as is "Esquiline Hill" unique to me and the setting for my poetry, Shadowville.
So, Ping; George Dance.
:)
It seem original to my trained ears....
Will Dockery
2018-08-16 20:45:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
How do you sit, NG?

:)
ME
2018-08-16 20:48:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
How do you sit, NG?
:)
Damn will, talk about a personal question!
NancyGene
2018-08-16 20:49:20 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
How do you sit, NG?
We sit like proper ladies--knees together and legs crossed at the ankles. Please relate that advice to all your lady friends.
Will Dockery
2018-08-16 20:50:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
So claims NG...

An anonymous troll.

:)
ME
2018-08-16 20:54:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
So claims NG...
An anonymous troll.
:)
Then why ask an anonymous troll a personal question will?
BPJ
2018-08-16 21:03:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by ME
Post by Will Dockery
So claims NG...
An anonymous troll.
:)
Then why ask an anonymous troll a personal question will?
I do know that Pick sit's on FF's face...
ME
2018-08-16 21:06:33 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by BPJ
Post by ME
Post by Will Dockery
So claims NG...
An anonymous troll.
:)
Then why ask an anonymous troll a personal question will?
I do know that Pick sit's on FF's face...
Jim, please don’t give ME anymore of those mental images.
BPJ
2018-08-16 21:10:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by ME
Post by BPJ
Post by ME
Post by Will Dockery
So claims NG...
An anonymous troll.
:)
Then why ask an anonymous troll a personal question will?
I do know that Pick sit's on FF's face...
Jim, please don’t give ME anymore of those mental images.
It will disappear soon....
Will Dockery
2018-08-16 22:13:07 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by BPJ
Post by ME
Jim, please don’t give ME anymore of those mental images.
It will disappear soon....
Not with you... the image has been lodged in your head for what, a year now?

Heh...
NancyGene
2018-08-16 21:13:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by ME
Post by Will Dockery
So claims NG...
An anonymous troll.
:)
Then why ask an anonymous troll a personal question will?
I do know that Pick sits on FF's face...
Knees together with legs crossed at the ankles?
Will Dockery
2018-08-16 21:01:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Why not?

:)
Will Dockery
2018-08-16 21:31:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
No, that's just your slobbery fantasy, Jimmy.

:)
Norman Bean
2018-08-19 07:34:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
It's painfully obvious that your poem was "inspired," at least in part, from "Suzanne Takes You Down." In fact, I'd venture to guess that the vast majority of your poems are derived from rock or folkie songs (like that "Hotel California" clone)
Which you were also mistaken about, and I explained to you nearly endlessly.
I'm just not well-versed enough in late 60s/early 70s music to pick up on them all.
Seriously, nothing like that is there, although I do love Leonard Cohen's poetry, this is working in a very different area than "Suzanne"... ask somebody who would actually know, like George Dance.
http://youtu.be/st3dbWFKpB8
Angel of Esquiline Hill
Poem by Will Dockery
Music by Rob Wright and Jack Snipe.
Again, I love the Leonard Cohen poetry, but this poem is operating on a whole other level, one personal to me and my world, as is "Esquiline Hill" unique to me and the setting for my poetry, Shadowville.
So, Ping; George Dance.
:)
An angel who flew too close to the ground...
Rachel
2018-08-20 05:26:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Norman Bean
Post by Will Dockery
It's painfully obvious that your poem was "inspired," at least in part, from "Suzanne Takes You Down." In fact, I'd venture to guess that the vast majority of your poems are derived from rock or folkie songs (like that "Hotel California" clone)
Which you were also mistaken about, and I explained to you nearly endlessly.
I'm just not well-versed enough in late 60s/early 70s music to pick up on them all.
Seriously, nothing like that is there, although I do love Leonard Cohen's poetry, this is working in a very different area than "Suzanne"... ask somebody who would actually know, like George Dance.
http://youtu.be/st3dbWFKpB8
Angel of Esquiline Hill
Poem by Will Dockery
Music by Rob Wright and Jack Snipe.
Again, I love the Leonard Cohen poetry, but this poem is operating on a whole other level, one personal to me and my world, as is "Esquiline Hill" unique to me and the setting for my poetry, Shadowville.
So, Ping; George Dance.
:)
An angel who flew too close to the ground...
oh i was scrolling through this quickly, i thought it said your name was norma rae.
Will Dockery
2018-08-20 14:22:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I take it you finally understand how you were wrong about this poem, Pendragon?

😀
Michael Pendragon
2018-08-20 14:30:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
I take it you finally understand how you were wrong about this poem, Pendragon?
Why would you even think such a thing?

The poem was clearly inspired by Cohen's work.

How many times must I randomly chop and mix the two before you understand?
ME
2018-08-20 14:39:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
I take it you finally understand how you were wrong about this poem, Pendragon?
Why would you even think such a thing?
The poem was clearly inspired by Cohen's work.
How many times must I randomly chop and mix the two before you understand?
His threads aren’t getting ALL the posts today, so expect him to drag back up some old drama on a bunch of them.
Will Dockery
2018-08-20 15:55:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
No, Pendragon, as I've corrected you over and over, the poem was not
inspired at all by Leonard Cohen.

Google, say, "Esquiline" + "Moses" and you'll very likely see some of the
local legends, myths and history that inspired "Angel of Esquiline Hill".

I'm out here with the mobile gizmo right now, so for now, that rip as to the
inspiration for the poem will have to suffice, Pendragon.
--
http://youtu.be/st3dbWFKpB8

Angel of Esquiline Hill
Poem by Will Dockery
Music by Rob Wright and Jack Snipe

...
Michael Pendragon
2018-08-20 16:07:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
No, Pendragon, as I've corrected you over and over, the poem was not
inspired at all by Leonard Cohen.
Google, say, "Esquiline" + "Moses" and you'll very likely see some of the
local legends, myths and history that inspired "Angel of Esquiline Hill".
I'm out here with the mobile gizmo right now, so for now, that rip as to the
inspiration for the poem will have to suffice, Pendragon.
Answered in another thread.

You need to learn to post your replies once ... in one thread ... not in twenty different ones.
Will Dockery
2018-08-21 00:53:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Totally untrue, Pendragon, but that's never stopped you before.

😀
Michael Pendragon
2018-08-21 00:59:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Totally untrue, Pendragon, but that's never stopped you before.
You know I've never lied about you, Will.
Will Dockery
2018-08-21 01:00:51 UTC
Reply
Permalink
You're wrong about this poem, though, Pendragon.

It has nothing in common with the Leonard Cohen poem.
Michael Pendragon
2018-08-21 01:12:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
You're wrong about this poem, though, Pendragon.
It has nothing in common with the Leonard Cohen poem.
It's pretty hard to exchange lines from unrelated poems by two different poets and have them still make sense and flow naturally and rhythmically from one line to the next.

If someone unfamiliar with Cohen's song were to hear you sing my last swap out, he'd have no idea that it had been pieced together from two poems:

Suzanne takes you down to her place near the river
You can hear the boats go by
You can spend the night forever
And you know that she's half-crazy
But that's why you want to be there
On her wit we humbly wait
Arm and Hammer tattooed on her shoulder.
Goddess gold and dusted
And she feeds you tea and oranges
That come all the way from China
Watch her run like wild horses
Sirens ring out on that hill tonight
Sirens ring out like little speckles tonight
And just when you mean to tell her
That you have no love to give her
Then he gets you on her wavelength
And she lets the river answer
That you've always been her lover
From the North Highland
Did she go the way of the world and the wood?
Pale blue skin and sky
Little prisms semi-naked on horseback
Dark halo surrounds her beautiful evil
And you want to travel with her
and you want to travel blind
And you know that she will trust you
For you've touched her perfect body with your mind
Let me take you down she says
Down, down again
Let me take you down son
Take you down
Into the sirens... on high

etc.
Will Dockery
2018-08-21 02:11:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
You're wrong about this poem, though, Pendragon.
It has nothing in common with the Leonard Cohen poem.
It's pretty hard to exchange lines from unrelated poems by two different poets and have them still make sense and flow naturally and rhythmically from one line to the next.
But many people are ore familiar with Leonard Cohen than you, they would know the difference immediately.

:)
Michael Pendragon
2018-08-21 03:14:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
You're wrong about this poem, though, Pendragon.
It has nothing in common with the Leonard Cohen poem.
It's pretty hard to exchange lines from unrelated poems by two different poets and have them still make sense and flow naturally and rhythmically from one line to the next.
But many people are ore familiar with Leonard Cohen than you, they would know the difference immediately.
Wow! Really, Will?

Leonard Cohen fans who know his song by heart would immediately know that I'd stuck lumps of your poem into his lyric?

Ya think???
Will Dockery
2018-08-21 04:41:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Exactly, Pendragon.

In other words, my poem and Leonard Cohen's poem are not at all interchangeable, as you've been claiming.

😀
Michael Pendragon
2018-08-21 12:29:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Exactly, Pendragon.
In other words, my poem and Leonard Cohen's poem are not at all interchangeable, as you've been claiming.
You really are as dumb as a mother fucker.

Your poem and Cohen's are extremely interchangeable -- as I have shown by two examples.

The fact that a Cohen fan would recognize the words to a Cohen song has no bearing whatsoever on the issue. Fans memorize songs and poems. I can sing along with literally 1,000s of songs and would immediately know if a line had been altered.

The two hybrid poems I've created by swapping out lines from "Esquiline" and "Suzanne" read smoothly and make as much sense as either of their originals. There's just no escaping that, Will.
Will Dockery
2018-08-21 19:39:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Exactly, Pendragon.
In other words, my poem and Leonard Cohen's poem are not at all interchangeable, as you've been claiming.
You really are as dumb as a mother fucker.
There's no reason for bullshit like that, Pendragon.

When in fact I think you look like an even dumber mother fucker for underestimating me like you do.

That said...
Post by Michael Pendragon
Your poem and Cohen's are extremely interchangeable -- as I have shown by two examples.
The fact that a Cohen fan would recognize the words to a Cohen song has no bearing whatsoever on the issue. Fans memorize songs and poems. I can sing along with literally 1,000s of songs and would immediately know if a line had been altered.
The two hybrid poems I've created by swapping out lines from "Esquiline" and "Suzanne" read smoothly and make as much sense as either of their originals. There's just no escaping that, Will.
Again, this is becoming quite interesting to me, and I'll have a closer look when time permits.

:)
Michael Pendragon
2018-08-21 19:48:53 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
Exactly, Pendragon.
In other words, my poem and Leonard Cohen's poem are not at all interchangeable, as you've been claiming.
You really are as dumb as a mother fucker.
There's no reason for bullshit like that, Pendragon.
When I have to explain a simple point to you seventeen different times, you're one dumbass mother fucker.
Post by Will Dockery
When in fact I think you look like an even dumber mother fucker for underestimating me like you do.
Believe me when I say this, Will -- I could never underestimate you.
Post by Will Dockery
That said...
Post by Michael Pendragon
Your poem and Cohen's are extremely interchangeable -- as I have shown by two examples.
The fact that a Cohen fan would recognize the words to a Cohen song has no bearing whatsoever on the issue. Fans memorize songs and poems. I can sing along with literally 1,000s of songs and would immediately know if a line had been altered.
The two hybrid poems I've created by swapping out lines from "Esquiline" and "Suzanne" read smoothly and make as much sense as either of their originals. There's just no escaping that, Will.
Again, this is becoming quite interesting to me, and I'll have a closer look when time permits.
Good. And when you're done try swapping out a few lines on your own, by way of experiment.
h***@gmail.com
2018-08-21 20:43:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Okay, so which would you consider the more grammatically correct,
'dumbass mother fucker', or 'dumbassed motherfucker'? I've seen
you use it both ways in reference to Doc and Pickles respectively.
Michael Pendragon
2018-08-21 20:54:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by h***@gmail.com
Okay, so which would you consider the more grammatically correct,
'dumbass mother fucker', or 'dumbassed motherfucker'? I've seen
you use it both ways in reference to Doc and Pickles respectively.
The terms have slightly different meanings: the first denotes a very stupid person; the latter, a very stupid person saddled with a very stupid backside as well.
h***@gmail.com
2018-08-21 20:59:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
That's what I thought, thanks.
Will Dockery
2018-08-22 22:04:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
The use of the term actually labels the user as the real fool.

:)
Michael Pendragon
2018-08-23 00:59:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
The use of the term actually labels the user as the real fool.
It's legal terminology from jolly old England, fool.

http://englishchamber.blogspot.com/2005/09/idiots-morons-imbeciles-cretins.html
Will Dockery
2018-08-23 02:21:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Your PJR wannabe status is now confirmed, Pendragon.

:)
Me
2018-08-23 02:41:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by Will Dockery
The use of the term actually labels the user as the real fool.
It's legal terminology from jolly old England, fool.
http://englishchamber.blogspot.com/2005/09/idiots-morons-imbeciles-cretins.html
Michael, “Twist and Shout”
Just to verify, you meant will is a dumb assed mother fucker.
Correct?

Norman Bean
2018-08-21 05:58:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Will Dockery
It's painfully obvious that your poem was "inspired," at least in part, from "Suzanne Takes You Down." In fact, I'd venture to guess that the vast majority of your poems are derived from rock or folkie songs (like that "Hotel California" clone)
Which you were also mistaken about, and I explained to you nearly endlessly.
I'm just not well-versed enough in late 60s/early 70s music to pick up on them all.
Seriously, nothing like that is there, although I do love Leonard Cohen's poetry, this is working in a very different area than "Suzanne"... ask somebody who would actually know, like George Dance.
http://youtu.be/st3dbWFKpB8
Angel of Esquiline Hill
Poem by Will Dockery
Music by Rob Wright and Jack Snipe.
Again, I love the Leonard Cohen poetry, but this poem is operating on a whole other level, one personal to me and my world, as is "Esquiline Hill" unique to me and the setting for my poetry, Shadowville.
So, Ping; George Dance.
:)
Cohen did rock out.....
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