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PPB: To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time / Robert Herrick
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George J. Dance
2020-05-24 18:40:38 UTC
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Today's poem on Penny's Poetry Blog:
To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time, by Robert Herrick

Gather ye rose-buds while ye may,
Old Time is still a-flying;
And this same flower that smiles today
Tomorrow will be dying.
[...]

https://gdancesbetty.blogspot.com/2020/05/to-virgins-to-make-much-of-time-robert.html
Rocky
2020-05-26 00:23:04 UTC
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Post by George J. Dance
To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time, by Robert Herrick
Gather ye rose-buds while ye may,
Old Time is still a-flying;
And this same flower that smiles today
Tomorrow will be dying.
[...]
https://gdancesbetty.blogspot.com/2020/05/to-virgins-to-make-much-of-time-robert.html
Very good....
George J. Dance
2020-05-26 17:46:25 UTC
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Post by Rocky
Post by George J. Dance
To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time, by Robert Herrick
Gather ye rose-buds while ye may,
Old Time is still a-flying;
And this same flower that smiles today
Tomorrow will be dying.
[...]
https://gdancesbetty.blogspot.com/2020/05/to-virgins-to-make-much-of-time-robert.html
Very good....
It's one of the canonical "great poems." When I started PPB, I deliberately tried to keep those off, because they're so easily found elsewhere; now that I have a full decade of poetry on the blog, though, I think they're a good way to attract new readers.
k***@gmail.com
2020-05-26 19:02:28 UTC
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Post by George J. Dance
Post by Rocky
Post by George J. Dance
To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time, by Robert Herrick
Gather ye rose-buds while ye may,
Old Time is still a-flying;
And this same flower that smiles today
Tomorrow will be dying.
[...]
https://gdancesbetty.blogspot.com/2020/05/to-virgins-to-make-much-of-time-robert.html
Very good....
It's one of the canonical "great poems." When I started PPB, I deliberately tried to keep those off, because they're so easily found elsewhere; now that I have a full decade of poetry on the blog, though, I think they're a good way to attract new readers.
I don't like that poem; it implies that women should make the most of their youthful beauty while they have it and marry, as if that is all they have that's worth anything.

Carpe diem is good advice, but I prefer "make hay while the sun shines" to "gather ye rosebuds while ye may."
Michael Pendragon
2020-05-27 01:50:23 UTC
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Post by k***@gmail.com
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Rocky
Post by George J. Dance
To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time, by Robert Herrick
Gather ye rose-buds while ye may,
Old Time is still a-flying;
And this same flower that smiles today
Tomorrow will be dying.
[...]
https://gdancesbetty.blogspot.com/2020/05/to-virgins-to-make-much-of-time-robert.html
Very good....
It's one of the canonical "great poems." When I started PPB, I deliberately tried to keep those off, because they're so easily found elsewhere; now that I have a full decade of poetry on the blog, though, I think they're a good way to attract new readers.
I don't like that poem; it implies that women should make the most of their youthful beauty while they have it and marry, as if that is all they have that's worth anything.
Men do tend to be a trifle superficial in that regard.
Post by k***@gmail.com
Carpe diem is good advice, but I prefer "make hay while the sun shines" to "gather ye rosebuds while ye may."
Rocky
2020-06-01 23:51:58 UTC
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Post by k***@gmail.com
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Rocky
Post by George J. Dance
To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time, by Robert Herrick
Gather ye rose-buds while ye may,
Old Time is still a-flying;
And this same flower that smiles today
Tomorrow will be dying.
[...]
https://gdancesbetty.blogspot.com/2020/05/to-virgins-to-make-much-of-time-robert.html
Very good....
It's one of the canonical "great poems." When I started PPB, I deliberately tried to keep those off, because they're so easily found elsewhere; now that I have a full decade of poetry on the blog, though, I think they're a good way to attract new readers.
I don't like that poem; it implies that women should make the most of their youthful beauty while they have it and marry, as if that is all they have that's worth anything.
Carpe diem is good advice, but I prefer "make hay while the sun shines" to "gather ye rosebuds while ye may."
Good points....
George J. Dance
2020-06-25 16:26:59 UTC
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Post by k***@gmail.com
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Rocky
Post by George J. Dance
To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time, by Robert Herrick
Gather ye rose-buds while ye may,
Old Time is still a-flying;
And this same flower that smiles today
Tomorrow will be dying.
[...]
https://gdancesbetty.blogspot.com/2020/05/to-virgins-to-make-much-of-time-robert.html
Very good....
It's one of the canonical "great poems." When I started PPB, I deliberately tried to keep those off, because they're so easily found elsewhere; now that I have a full decade of poetry on the blog, though, I think they're a good way to attract new readers.
I don't like that poem; it implies that women should make the most of their youthful beauty while they have it and marry, as if that is all they have that's worth anything.
I've been busy, of course, but besides that it took me a while to reply, because I think you're correct in your analysis. But left at that, I don't like the poem much - so let me give you an alternative interpretation. I'm sure it isn't the writer's, of course, but it may give the poem a new lease on life.

That is to imagine the poem said or thought by a 'speaker' and imagine it from that angle. I imagine a big spender at a bar or club, probably a bestselling poet, songster, or even rapper, reciting it to the gold-diggers gathered round him. The theme: he's a horny guy, he wants That Thing, and he's sweet-talking a lady to get it.

As such, it's a commentary on my sex, and what pigs we can be, always thinking of That Thing. But it's true enough, if exaggerated for effect, that we do keep thinking about it. I'd call it "horny guy" poetry and encourage you to see in in that genre.

Once you do recognize the genre, you'll spot it everywhere, through the centuries and in at least 6 of the 7 ages of man - from Philip Sidney's frustrated teen in "Philomela" -

https://gdancesbetty.blogspot.com/2019/04/philomela-philip-sidney.html

- to Yeats' old Senator with the roving eye and mind in "Politics" -

https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/57588/politics-56d23b40c4ed6

All 3 excellent poems, all of which I'd hate to see consigned to the dustbin of history by changing attitudes. Which is why I'd encourage looking at them from the "horny guy" perspective.
Post by k***@gmail.com
Carpe diem is good advice, but I prefer "make hay while the sun shines" to "gather ye rosebuds while ye may."
NancyGene
2020-06-25 16:38:02 UTC
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Post by George J. Dance
Post by k***@gmail.com
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Rocky
Post by George J. Dance
To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time, by Robert Herrick
Gather ye rose-buds while ye may,
Old Time is still a-flying;
And this same flower that smiles today
Tomorrow will be dying.
[...]
https://gdancesbetty.blogspot.com/2020/05/to-virgins-to-make-much-of-time-robert.html
Very good....
It's one of the canonical "great poems." When I started PPB, I deliberately tried to keep those off, because they're so easily found elsewhere; now that I have a full decade of poetry on the blog, though, I think they're a good way to attract new readers.
I don't like that poem; it implies that women should make the most of their youthful beauty while they have it and marry, as if that is all they have that's worth anything.
I've been busy, of course, but besides that it took me a while to reply, because I think you're correct in your analysis. But left at that, I don't like the poem much - so let me give you an alternative interpretation. I'm sure it isn't the writer's, of course, but it may give the poem a new lease on life.
That is to imagine the poem said or thought by a 'speaker' and imagine it from that angle. I imagine a big spender at a bar or club, probably a bestselling poet, songster, or even rapper, reciting it to the gold-diggers gathered round him. The theme: he's a horny guy, he wants That Thing, and he's sweet-talking a lady to get it.
As such, it's a commentary on my sex, and what pigs we can be, always thinking of That Thing. But it's true enough, if exaggerated for effect, that we do keep thinking about it. I'd call it "horny guy" poetry and encourage you to see in in that genre.
Once you do recognize the genre, you'll spot it everywhere, through the centuries and in at least 6 of the 7 ages of man - from Philip Sidney's frustrated teen in "Philomela" -
https://gdancesbetty.blogspot.com/2019/04/philomela-philip-sidney.html
- to Yeats' old Senator with the roving eye and mind in "Politics" -
https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/57588/politics-56d23b40c4ed6
All 3 excellent poems, all of which I'd hate to see consigned to the dustbin of history by changing attitudes. Which is why I'd encourage looking at them from the "horny guy" perspective.
Post by k***@gmail.com
Carpe diem is good advice, but I prefer "make hay while the sun shines" to "gather ye rosebuds while ye may."
“Don't waste the pretty” ― Greg Behrendt
Michael Pendragon
2020-06-25 18:05:21 UTC
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Post by George J. Dance
Post by k***@gmail.com
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Rocky
Post by George J. Dance
To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time, by Robert Herrick
Gather ye rose-buds while ye may,
Old Time is still a-flying;
And this same flower that smiles today
Tomorrow will be dying.
[...]
https://gdancesbetty.blogspot.com/2020/05/to-virgins-to-make-much-of-time-robert.html
Very good....
It's one of the canonical "great poems." When I started PPB, I deliberately tried to keep those off, because they're so easily found elsewhere; now that I have a full decade of poetry on the blog, though, I think they're a good way to attract new readers.
I don't like that poem; it implies that women should make the most of their youthful beauty while they have it and marry, as if that is all they have that's worth anything.
I've been busy, of course, but besides that it took me a while to reply, because I think you're correct in your analysis. But left at that, I don't like the poem much - so let me give you an alternative interpretation. I'm sure it isn't the writer's, of course, but it may give the poem a new lease on life.
That is to imagine the poem said or thought by a 'speaker' and imagine it from that angle. I imagine a big spender at a bar or club, probably a bestselling poet, songster, or even rapper, reciting it to the gold-diggers gathered round him. The theme: he's a horny guy, he wants That Thing, and he's sweet-talking a lady to get it.
As such, it's a commentary on my sex, and what pigs we can be, always thinking of That Thing. But it's true enough, if exaggerated for effect, that we do keep thinking about it. I'd call it "horny guy" poetry and encourage you to see in in that genre.
Once you do recognize the genre, you'll spot it everywhere, through the centuries and in at least 6 of the 7 ages of man - from Philip Sidney's frustrated teen in "Philomela" -
https://gdancesbetty.blogspot.com/2019/04/philomela-philip-sidney.html
- to Yeats' old Senator with the roving eye and mind in "Politics" -
https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/57588/politics-56d23b40c4ed6
All 3 excellent poems, all of which I'd hate to see consigned to the dustbin of history by changing attitudes. Which is why I'd encourage looking at them from the "horny guy" perspective.
Post by k***@gmail.com
Carpe diem is good advice, but I prefer "make hay while the sun shines" to "gather ye rosebuds while ye may."
I'm sorry, George, but your "horny guy poem" explanation is just weird.

Robert Herrick isn't attempting to hit on anyone. You're confusing him with Andrew Marvell and his similarly themed "To His Coy Mistress."

Herrick's simply making an observation about the fleeting and transitory nature of youth -- and, ultimately, of life.

In Herrick's verse, I get the impression of an elderly man instructing young lovers of both sexes to marry while they're young, healthy and attractive.

There is also a hint that the speaker has spent his life in bachelorhood (as did Herrick), and that he is asking them to learn from his mistakes.
k***@gmail.com
2020-06-25 19:16:05 UTC
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Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by George J. Dance
Post by k***@gmail.com
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Rocky
Post by George J. Dance
To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time, by Robert Herrick
Gather ye rose-buds while ye may,
Old Time is still a-flying;
And this same flower that smiles today
Tomorrow will be dying.
[...]
https://gdancesbetty.blogspot.com/2020/05/to-virgins-to-make-much-of-time-robert.html
Very good....
It's one of the canonical "great poems." When I started PPB, I deliberately tried to keep those off, because they're so easily found elsewhere; now that I have a full decade of poetry on the blog, though, I think they're a good way to attract new readers.
I don't like that poem; it implies that women should make the most of their youthful beauty while they have it and marry, as if that is all they have that's worth anything.
I've been busy, of course, but besides that it took me a while to reply, because I think you're correct in your analysis. But left at that, I don't like the poem much - so let me give you an alternative interpretation. I'm sure it isn't the writer's, of course, but it may give the poem a new lease on life.
That is to imagine the poem said or thought by a 'speaker' and imagine it from that angle. I imagine a big spender at a bar or club, probably a bestselling poet, songster, or even rapper, reciting it to the gold-diggers gathered round him. The theme: he's a horny guy, he wants That Thing, and he's sweet-talking a lady to get it.
As such, it's a commentary on my sex, and what pigs we can be, always thinking of That Thing. But it's true enough, if exaggerated for effect, that we do keep thinking about it. I'd call it "horny guy" poetry and encourage you to see in in that genre.
Once you do recognize the genre, you'll spot it everywhere, through the centuries and in at least 6 of the 7 ages of man - from Philip Sidney's frustrated teen in "Philomela" -
https://gdancesbetty.blogspot.com/2019/04/philomela-philip-sidney.html
- to Yeats' old Senator with the roving eye and mind in "Politics" -
https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/57588/politics-56d23b40c4ed6
All 3 excellent poems, all of which I'd hate to see consigned to the dustbin of history by changing attitudes. Which is why I'd encourage looking at them from the "horny guy" perspective.
Post by k***@gmail.com
Carpe diem is good advice, but I prefer "make hay while the sun shines" to "gather ye rosebuds while ye may."
I'm sorry, George, but your "horny guy poem" explanation is just weird.
Robert Herrick isn't attempting to hit on anyone. You're confusing him with Andrew Marvell and his similarly themed "To His Coy Mistress."
Herrick's simply making an observation about the fleeting and transitory nature of youth -- and, ultimately, of life.
In Herrick's verse, I get the impression of an elderly man instructing young lovers of both sexes to marry while they're young, healthy and attractive.
There is also a hint that the speaker has spent his life in bachelorhood (as did Herrick), and that he is asking them to learn from his mistakes.
I'd agree with you except that "Virgins" and "rose-buds" usually refer to women. If this was addressed "To the Young," you'd have a stronger argument.
Will Dockery
2020-06-25 20:17:20 UTC
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Post by Michael Pendragon
Post by George J. Dance
Post by k***@gmail.com
Post by George J. Dance
Post by Rocky
Post by George J. Dance
To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time, by Robert Herrick
Gather ye rose-buds while ye may,
Old Time is still a-flying;
And this same flower that smiles today
Tomorrow will be dying.
[...]
https://gdancesbetty.blogspot.com/2020/05/to-virgins-to-make-much-of-time-robert.html
Very good....
It's one of the canonical "great poems." When I started PPB, I deliberately tried to keep those off, because they're so easily found elsewhere; now that I have a full decade of poetry on the blog, though, I think they're a good way to attract new readers.
I don't like that poem; it implies that women should make the most of their youthful beauty while they have it and marry, as if that is all they have that's worth anything.
I've been busy, of course, but besides that it took me a while to reply, because I think you're correct in your analysis. But left at that, I don't like the poem much - so let me give you an alternative interpretation. I'm sure it isn't the writer's, of course, but it may give the poem a new lease on life.
That is to imagine the poem said or thought by a 'speaker' and imagine it from that angle. I imagine a big spender at a bar or club, probably a bestselling poet, songster, or even rapper, reciting it to the gold-diggers gathered round him. The theme: he's a horny guy, he wants That Thing, and he's sweet-talking a lady to get it.
As such, it's a commentary on my sex, and what pigs we can be, always thinking of That Thing. But it's true enough, if exaggerated for effect, that we do keep thinking about it. I'd call it "horny guy" poetry and encourage you to see in in that genre.
Once you do recognize the genre, you'll spot it everywhere, through the centuries and in at least 6 of the 7 ages of man - from Philip Sidney's frustrated teen in "Philomela" -
https://gdancesbetty.blogspot.com/2019/04/philomela-philip-sidney.html
- to Yeats' old Senator with the roving eye and mind in "Politics" -
https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/57588/politics-56d23b40c4ed6
All 3 excellent poems, all of which I'd hate to see consigned to the dustbin of history by changing attitudes. Which is why I'd encourage looking at them from the "horny guy" perspective.
Post by k***@gmail.com
Carpe diem is good advice, but I prefer "make hay while the sun shines" to "gather ye rosebuds while ye may."
I'm sorry, George, but your "horny guy poem" explanation is just weird.
Robert Herrick isn't attempting to hit on anyone. You're confusing him with Andrew Marvell and his similarly themed "To His Coy Mistress."
Herrick's simply making an observation about the fleeting and transitory nature of youth -- and, ultimately, of life.
In Herrick's verse, I get the impression of an elderly man instructing young lovers of both sexes to marry while they're young, healthy and attractive.
There is also a hint that the speaker has spent his life in bachelorhood (as did Herrick), and that he is asking them to learn from his mistakes.
I'd agree with you except that "Virgins" and "rose-buds" usually refer to women. If this was addressed "To the Young," you'd have a stronger argument.
As a lifelong Orson Welles fan, I got a chuckle from this.

;)
Zod
2020-07-01 00:18:59 UTC
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Post by George J. Dance
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Post by George J. Dance
To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time, by Robert Herrick
Gather ye rose-buds while ye may,
Old Time is still a-flying;
And this same flower that smiles today
Tomorrow will be dying.
[...]
https://gdancesbetty.blogspot.com/2020/05/to-virgins-to-make-much-of-time-robert.html
Very good....
It's one of the canonical "great poems." When I started PPB, I deliberately tried to keep those off, because they're so easily found elsewhere; now that I have a full decade of poetry on the blog, though, I think they're a good way to attract new readers.
I don't like that poem; it implies that women should make the most of their youthful beauty while they have it and marry, as if that is all they have that's worth anything.
I've been busy, of course, but besides that it took me a while to reply, because I think you're correct in your analysis. But left at that, I don't like the poem much - so let me give you an alternative interpretation. I'm sure it isn't the writer's, of course, but it may give the poem a new lease on life.
That is to imagine the poem said or thought by a 'speaker' and imagine it from that angle. I imagine a big spender at a bar or club, probably a bestselling poet, songster, or even rapper, reciting it to the gold-diggers gathered round him. The theme: he's a horny guy, he wants That Thing, and he's sweet-talking a lady to get it.
As such, it's a commentary on my sex, and what pigs we can be, always thinking of That Thing. But it's true enough, if exaggerated for effect, that we do keep thinking about it. I'd call it "horny guy" poetry and encourage you to see in in that genre.
Once you do recognize the genre, you'll spot it everywhere, through the centuries and in at least 6 of the 7 ages of man - from Philip Sidney's frustrated teen in "Philomela" -
https://gdancesbetty.blogspot.com/2019/04/philomela-philip-sidney.html
- to Yeats' old Senator with the roving eye and mind in "Politics" -
https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/57588/politics-56d23b40c4ed6
All 3 excellent poems, all of which I'd hate to see consigned to the dustbin of history by changing attitudes. Which is why I'd encourage looking at them from the "horny guy" perspective.
Post by k***@gmail.com
Carpe diem is good advice, but I prefer "make hay while the sun shines" to "gather ye rosebuds while ye may."
I'm sorry, George, but your "horny guy poem" explanation is just weird.
Robert Herrick isn't attempting to hit on anyone. You're confusing him with Andrew Marvell and his similarly themed "To His Coy Mistress."
Herrick's simply making an observation about the fleeting and transitory nature of youth -- and, ultimately, of life.
In Herrick's verse, I get the impression of an elderly man instructing young lovers of both sexes to marry while they're young, healthy and attractive.
There is also a hint that the speaker has spent his life in bachelorhood (as did Herrick), and that he is asking them to learn from his mistakes.
I'd agree with you except that "Virgins" and "rose-buds" usually refer to women. If this was addressed "To the Young," you'd have a stronger argument.
As a lifelong Orson Welles fan, I got a chuckle from this.
;)
Exactly, sometimes A SLED IS NOT REALLY A SLED....
Will Dockery
2020-07-02 13:08:32 UTC
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Post by George J. Dance
Post by k***@gmail.com
Post by George J. Dance
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Post by George J. Dance
To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time, by Robert Herrick
Gather ye rose-buds while ye may,
Old Time is still a-flying;
And this same flower that smiles today
Tomorrow will be dying.
[...]
https://gdancesbetty.blogspot.com/2020/05/to-virgins-to-make-much-of-time-robert.html
Very good....
It's one of the canonical "great poems." When I started PPB, I deliberately tried to keep those off, because they're so easily found elsewhere; now that I have a full decade of poetry on the blog, though, I think they're a good way to attract new readers.
I don't like that poem; it implies that women should make the most of their youthful beauty while they have it and marry, as if that is all they have that's worth anything.
I've been busy, of course, but besides that it took me a while to reply, because I think you're correct in your analysis. But left at that, I don't like the poem much - so let me give you an alternative interpretation. I'm sure it isn't the writer's, of course, but it may give the poem a new lease on life.
That is to imagine the poem said or thought by a 'speaker' and imagine it from that angle. I imagine a big spender at a bar or club, probably a bestselling poet, songster, or even rapper, reciting it to the gold-diggers gathered round him. The theme: he's a horny guy, he wants That Thing, and he's sweet-talking a lady to get it.
As such, it's a commentary on my sex, and what pigs we can be, always thinking of That Thing. But it's true enough, if exaggerated for effect, that we do keep thinking about it. I'd call it "horny guy" poetry and encourage you to see in in that genre.
Once you do recognize the genre, you'll spot it everywhere, through the centuries and in at least 6 of the 7 ages of man - from Philip Sidney's frustrated teen in "Philomela" -
https://gdancesbetty.blogspot.com/2019/04/philomela-philip-sidney.html
- to Yeats' old Senator with the roving eye and mind in "Politics" -
https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/57588/politics-56d23b40c4ed6
All 3 excellent poems, all of which I'd hate to see consigned to the dustbin of history by changing attitudes. Which is why I'd encourage looking at them from the "horny guy" perspective.
Post by k***@gmail.com
Carpe diem is good advice, but I prefer "make hay while the sun shines" to "gather ye rosebuds while ye may."
"Lost time is not found again." -Bob Dylan

Zod
2020-05-26 20:35:00 UTC
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Post by George J. Dance
To the Virgins, to Make Much of Time, by Robert Herrick
Gather ye rose-buds while ye may,
Old Time is still a-flying;
And this same flower that smiles today
Tomorrow will be dying.
[...]
https://gdancesbetty.blogspot.com/2020/05/to-virgins-to-make-much-of-time-robert.html
Very good....
It's one of the canonical "great poems." When I started PPB, I deliberately tried to keep those off, because they're so easily found elsewhere; now that I have a full decade of poetry on the blog, though, I think they're a good way to attract new readers.
Yes your blog is a great mix or new and old obscure and famous....
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